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CrossPass by Demitra Thomloudis and Motoko Furuhashi

Exhibition  /  08 Sep 2016  -  09 Oct 2016
Published: 05.09.2016
Demi Thomloudis. Motoko Furuhashi. Brooch: Site 4, 2016. Steel, sand, dry grass, acrylic, paint, land segment, silver. Demi Thomloudis
Motoko Furuhashi
Brooch: Site 4, 2016
Steel, sand, dry grass, acrylic, paint, land segment, silver
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.

Intro
CrossPASS is a project featuring collaborative and solo works by artists Demitra Thomloudis and Motoko Furuhashi that examines place through expanded media and the intimate lens of jewelry and small objects.

Artist list

Motoko Furuhashi, Demi Thomloudis
The project targets a distinctive stretch of the Interstate 10 corridor connecting the unique borderplex region of El Paso, Texas to Las Cruces, New Mexico.  The objective of CrossPass is to allow site-specific locations and the artists’ shared personal inquiries along this route to initiate the collection of images, video and sound which directly influences the creation of jewelry and objects. The viewer is asked to join them in their investigation of this land awash with dramatic terrain, vernacular structures and a multitude of boundaries; and, to uniquely discover these sites through the body.



Motoko Furuhashi was born in 1982 in Tokyo, Japan. While growing up in Tokyo, she received her introduction to art from her grandfather. Her recent works has been inspired by her experiences traveling around the world, and the road that takes her from one place to another. Motoko received her Masters of Fine Art degree from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Currently, she is an Assistant Professor at New Mexico State University. Her work has been exhibited nationally and internationally including at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, the Houston Center for Contemporary Craft, the Oakland Museum of California, and Nobana Art Works in Ginza in Tokyo. Publications include 500 Plastic Jewelry design by Lark Books, New Rings: 500+ Designs from Around the World by Nicolas Estrada, and Humor in Craft by Brigitte Martin.

Furuhashi Statement:
I am deeply fascinated with imperfection and the complexity of the natural cycle of growth, decay, and death as the processes that govern life. The overall intent with my work has been to slow the viewer down and make what goes unnoticed important. By highlighting what is viewed as imperfect my work can bring relevance to the object. My belief is that objects only gain importance when the artist draws attention to them. My work is a shift in the meaning of perfection, transforming our perception of reality to new perspectives.


Demitra Thomloudis is a studio jeweler, visual artist and an Assistant Professor in the Jewelry and Metalwork at the Lamar Dodd School of Art at the University of Georgia. Originally from the Philadelphia area, she received her MFA from San Diego State University and her BFA from the Cleveland Institute of Art. Her work is recognized nationally and internationally and she has exhibited, lectured, and taught at institutions, fairs, and events such as SOFA Chicago, Athens (Greece) Jewellery Week, and the Penland School of Crafts, to name a fewArtist residencies include a yearlong appointment at the Houston Center for Contemporary Craft and Smitten Forum. Demitra is included in publications such as 500 Plastic and Resin Jewelry, 500 Enameled Objects, and The Art of Jewelry: Plastic & Resin: Techniques, Projects and Inspiration. Demitra’s work is represented by Charon Kransen Arts-USA, Alliages Organization-France, and Penland Gallery at the Penland School of Crafts-USA.

Thomloudis Statement:
My jewelry is influenced by the ve­­rnacular architecture and landscapes of site-specific locations. This interest has led me to identify particular aesthetic characteristics and construction techniques that I employ to create works to be worn on the body. As an artist using jewelry and objects as an artistic format for self-expression, my work intends to challenge the construct of the medium as a means to examine value, material sign systems, and extensions of personal and place identity. By relating to the aesthetics of architecture, landscape, and place in this way, I see jewelry having the potential to connect us closer to the world we are surrounded by.

Opening

Artists’ Reception on Friday, September 9 from 6-8 pm.
 
Demi Thomloudis. Motoko Furuhashi. Necklace: Site 7, 2016. Brass, powder coat, sand, found materials. Demi Thomloudis
Motoko Furuhashi
Necklace: Site 7, 2016
Brass, powder coat, sand, found materials
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Demi Thomloudis. Motoko Furuhashi. Ring: Site 1, 2016. Steel, enamel, silver. Demi Thomloudis
Motoko Furuhashi
Ring: Site 1, 2016
Steel, enamel, silver
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Motoko Furuhashi. Demi Thomloudis. Brooch: Site 9, 2016. Nickel silver, fabric, steel. Motoko Furuhashi
Demi Thomloudis
Brooch: Site 9, 2016
Nickel silver, fabric, steel
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Demi Thomloudis. Motoko Furuhashi. Necklace: Site 5, 2016. Steel, sand, dry grass, acrylic, paint, land segment, silver. Demi Thomloudis
Motoko Furuhashi
Necklace: Site 5, 2016
Steel, sand, dry grass, acrylic, paint, land segment, silver
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
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