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Interview with Nicolas Estrada

Interview
Published: 28.08.2014
Interview with Nicolas Estrada.
Edited by:
Klimt02
Edited at:
Barcelona
Nicolas Estrada. Necklace: Tapunami's Secret, 2003. Vegetable ivory, silver, electric components. Nicolas Estrada
Necklace: Tapunami's Secret, 2003
Vegetable ivory, silver, electric components
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.

Intro
I think that jewellery schools and particular mentors have a much deeper influence than countries or regions when it comes to artistic jewellery. In my case there is a lot of Massana and Idar-Oberstein in my work (local) but this language has to appeal to the customers I have in different countries (universal).
Do you think that jewellery is being standardized? What is there of local and universal in your artistic work?
I think that jewellery in general has acquired a global language, you can find the same brands everywhere and fashion magazines promote a standard beauty that is accepted globally and sells massively. However, this is different with artistic jewellery: brands are not the same as individual work. Brands have to be accepted and commercial but individual work carries a particular imprint that is not necessarily appealing, yet interesting. There is a constant experimentation with materials and languages in artistic jewellery, emotions that cannot be standardized since they are not common everywhere, each artist carries her/his own heritage.
I think that jewellery schools and particular mentors have a much deeper influence than countries or regions when it comes to artistic jewellery. In my case there is a lot of Massana and Idar-Oberstein in my work (local) but this language has to appeal to the customers I have in different countries (universal).


What do you expect when exposing your work to the public (for example with an exhibition)?
My main goal is to sell my work. During an exhibition I like to meet potential customers and greet old friends but there is nothing that satisfies me more than selling my work, getting well-paid for it and seeing clients moved with my jewellery.

Are other areas besides the jewellery, present in your work?
My jewellery is full emotions; there is storytelling, poetry, violence, frustration, among many other feelings.

The last work, book, film, city that has moved me was...
Works: the surprising pieces from Eunmi Chun and Dongchun Lee.
Books: Letters to a Young Artist by Peter Nesbett, Shelly Bancroft and Sarah Andress. Iconologies by Michel Maffesoli.
Films: The Grand Budapest Hotel by Wes Anderson and the series True Detective by Nic Pizzolatto.
Cities: Barcelona will always be the city that moves me the most but recently Rügen, a quiet and beautiful German island in the Baltic Sea, showed me a kind of peace and beauty unknown to me before.
Music groups: The Black Keys and (always) Depeche Mode.


A place, space, country whose creativity surprises me...
Tears came to my eyes when I saw the book Castle in the Air, I could not believe how beautiful the jewellery from Estonia was. Recently I am very surprised by the jewellery from China, Korea, Taiwan and all Scandinavia. Best surprise during Schmuck 2014 was the exhibition Ni Hao!: ten fabulous artists from Taiwan with an amazing work and neat setup.

Is there any designer, jeweller, artist, you appreciate a lot?
Oh, there are many, artistic jewellery is full of creative and amazing people. I love the work from masters like Georg Dobler, Iris Boedemer and Philip Sajet. From young artists like Tanel Veenre, Julia Maria Künnap, Hanna Hedman, Denise J. Reytan, Stephanie Hensle, Tabea Reulecke and Tara Locklear, and emerging artists like Alexander Friedrich, Eva Burton, Sharareh Aghaei, and Levan Jishkariani, among many others. Artistic jewellers and artistic jewellery captivate me; this is a field of work full with amazing surprises. There are also artists like Stephan Balkenhol, Kadder Attia, Tacita Dean and Tino Sehgal, and designers like Ingo Maurer and Catalina Estrada, who inspire me a lot too.

What piece or work has given you the most satisfaction?
Long time ago, in 2003, Tapunami’s Secret opened my way into the jewellery world. That pendant will always be my most important jewel. Most recently, all my masters work after two amazing years in Germany, all these pieces made me fall in love again with artistic jewellery.

Do you read Jewellery Magazines? What is your source to get information?
I prefer to see jewellery than to read about it. However I have been reading fantastic articles at Current Obsession, and nice and fresh interviews and articles at Klimt02 and Art Jewelry Forum. However Schmuck, Sieraad, the Marzee Magazine and visits to jewellery galleries are my best source of information. Jewellery needs to be seen and touched, not read.

Do you discuss your work with other jewellery artists or any other person?
Our craft is an extremely lonely one. I can spend days, weeks and even months working in my atelier with not much contact with the outside world. And that level of introspection is necessary to a certain level. But there needs to be a discussion at some point, with other colleagues, with friends or ultimately with gallerists or customers, at the end others decide if they accept or not our work. I make jewellery to appeal others, not only me.

What is your first thought when you hear the word Future? What do you expect for?
I associate future with complete uncertainty. The only thing that I expect from the future is to be able to earn and have a decent living from this craft that I love and am passionate about.
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