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About curating. Bryna Pomp interviewed by klimt02

Interview  /  CuratingDebates
Published: 25.07.2016
Bryna Pomp, Photo by Annie Watt Bryna PompPhoto by Annie Watt
Author:
Klimt02
Edited by:
Klimt02
Edited at:
Barcelona
Edited on:
2016
Photo by Annie Watt.
Photo by Annie Watt

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.

Intro
My favorite part of the work is the research. When I look at an artist's portfolio for the first time I possess the same excitement and optimistic expectation I felt when I first began doing this many years ago. The thrill of discovery has never diminished.

Interview part of the Serie under the title Selecting: Communicating Knowledge.
What is the main function of a curator?
My goal for the past seven years as the curator of LOOT is to have the Museum of Arts and Design exhibit and sell the most interesting, inventive studio and art jewelry being created worldwide. I look at thousands of artists before making the final choice of the fifty who will be invited. My decision on each year's artist selection represents a carefully strategized plan to have represented the greatest breadth of materials I view in my daily research, all executed in the most highly aesthetic designs, along with the most superb craftsmanship. The accomplishment of the synthesis of these three elements - the materials, the design, and the workmanship - is present in the work of each artist I select.    

 
  • My decision on each year's artist selection represents a carefully strategized plan to have represented the greatest breadth of materials I view in my daily research, all executed in the most highly aesthetic designs, along with the most superb craftsmanship


What is the favourite / dislike part of your work?
My favorite part of the work is the research. When I look at an artist's portfolio for the first time I possess the same excitement and optimistic expectation I felt when I first began doing this many years ago. The thrill of discovery has never diminished.

Regarding to curatorial process, how does an idea usually start for an exhibition? And how do you develop it?
I am often asked if there is an underlying theme to LOOT; I always respond by saying that the theme is the breadth of materials and individual design directions that exist in the global creation of the jewelry I select, which I feel sort of represents the intersection of art, design and fashion.  

An exhibition, event, meeting... that has impressed you specially?
Every meeting I have one-on-one with an artist is a memorable experience because I love to hear about their inspiration and creative process. I treasure the very intense week I spend each year with all fifty of the LOOT artists all of whom are required to be present at MAD for the event.

How do you feel curating contemporary jewellery?
I've spent my whole career of more than thirty years in the field of jewelry. I look at jewelry portfolios 365 days a year and I spend all my my time reading everything I see everywhere about all forms of jewelry. Jewelry is my life and I cannot imagine ever doing anything else professionally.  

 
  • Jewelry is my life and I cannot imagine ever doing anything else professionally.  


What do you think is the most interesting thing that you helped to make happen?
We are continually presented with a wealth of opportunities at museums, galleries, and in public places to see and become engaged with contemporary art. It's quite a different situation when it comes to art jewelry, as there are scant occasions to see what is being created in this sector. 
MAD is certainly in the forefront in America in presenting each and every year collections of jewelry that represent the best of what is being made worldwide, so I am extremely proud of my role in furthering the exposure of studio and art jewelry to the public in New York and beyond. In the seven years I've been curating LOOT we have presented the work of more than 350 jewelry artists; I believe that LOOT has had a profound effect on these artists' careers. And, we have introduced thousands of women and men to a kind of jewelry they never knew existed and made them see far beyond the commercial, prosaic kind of jewelry they are normally exposed to.

 

About the Interviewed

After studying art history and French in college I was quite interested in the business of fashion and retailing. I went through the executive training program at Federated Department Stores, the best program in America, and the first week of the program I became the assistant buyer in fashion jewelry. After learning the skills of running a jewelry business from the retailer's point of view I then worked for a number of very large fashion jewelry companies, focusing on product development, strategic business planning, brand positioning, merchandising and marketing. I always worked very closely with the companies' designers and because of this I have a solid understanding of the creative process and how jewelry is actually made. During all these years I was always extremely interested in the less mainstream sectors of studio and art jewelry, which are now my primary focus.

In 2011 I became the curator of LOOT, the annual exhibition and sale of studio and art jewelry at the Museum of Arts and Design. LOOT has existed since the 1990's. I have successfully curated six editions of LOOT and am now working on LOOT 2017, which will take place at the Museum 3-8 April 2017.
Appreciate APPRECIATE