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Interview with Chelsea Fay

Interview  /  Artists
Published: 16.05.2014
Interview with Chelsea Fay.
Author:
Klimt02
Edited by:
Klimt02
Edited at:
Barcelona

Intro
People have been making decorative adornments, tools, and objects for hundreds of years. I believe the physical objects I create bring about a universal appreciation for the tangible and the functional. I bring these universal themes locally to my community by creating personal relationships with those that I do business with and drawing upon the people around me to teach and inspire me.
Do you think that jewelry is being standardized? What is there of local and universal in your artistic work?
The way I see it, there are several types of jewelry (fashion jewelry, fine jewelry, art jewelry, etc). Certain jewelry, found in your average jewelry stop can be very standardized. These pieces adhere to a strict set of standards including ascetics, materials, and functionality. However, there is a whole world of jewelry beyond these industry standards. Much diversity can be found in contemporary jewelry both in purpose and materials. Some work stretches the boundary of the functional into conceptual. Others apply new materials or new technologies in attempt to push boundaries

People have been making decorative adornments, tools, and objects for hundreds of years. I believe the physical objects I create bring about a universal appreciation for the tangible and the functional.
I bring these universal themes locally to my community by creating personal relationships with those that I do business with and drawing upon the people around me to teach and inspire me.

What do you expect when exposing your work to the public (for example with an exhibition)?
When I expose my work to the public, I am always hopeful of appreciation, but expect always criticism. It is the nature of art & craft that the work must be judged and must be held to a high standard. Though critiques can be hard, it is a strong motivator, pushing me to be better.

Are other areas besides the jewelry, present in your work?
Yes. Besides jewelry, I am an avid maker “objects” (utensils, tableware, lighting, and sometimes sculpture). These objects allow me to work on a larger scale and allow me to make functional products that can be touched, used, and cherished.

The last work, book, film, city that has moved me was...
The last film that moved me was The Grand Budapest Hotel by Wes Anderson. As in most of his films, the scenery was impeccable- each scene was a perfect combination of colors, movements, and dialogue. Though his medium is different that my own, I can identify with his ascetic and admire his sense of space and design.

A place, space, country whose creativity surprises me..
I am inspired a great deal by a place we cannot see with our own eyes; a world that can only viewed through a microscope. I look often at microscopic photographs or drawings – of organisms, of molecules, of our world dissected and amplified. I like to look at the structures- at their patterns, their delicate forms. In these macro images there is a sense of chaos coupled by an incredible symmetry that has never failed to evoke a sense of awe within me.

Is there any designer, jeweller, artist, you appreciate a lot?
For a few years now, my most admired artist has been David Huycke, Belgium based artist and metalsmith who wrote his doctoral dissertation on the granulation of sterling silver. His work balances repetition, simplicity, and impeccable craftsmanship into stunning works of art. His pieces are a huge inspiration to me and provide a quality of work in which I strive to achieve every day.

What piece or work has given you the most satisfaction?
The piece that has granted me the most satisfaction is a necklace entitled “Entropy” and was the main piece in my BFA Exhibition. The piece featured over 100 unique, hand fabricated and granulated links that drape seamlessly over the front and back of the torso. The piece was the biggest challenge I have yet to take on in my career, taking seven months and much of my sanity. Having completed it successfully, the necklace serves to remind me that of the countless hours of dedication and the extreme devotion that it took to create.

Do you read Jewellery Magazines? What is your source to get information?
Yes. I read Metalsmith Magazine and American Craft Magazine. I also visit websites and blogs such as SNAG, Crafthaus, Ganokskin, and now Klimt02! Besides these, I gain much of my information from technical books on historical metalsmithing.

Do you discuss your work with other jewelry artists or any other person?
Yes. I share and discuss my work with several of my former classmates. I also have the benefit of having friends and family involved in other fields (glass, wood, textiles, graphic design) that are able to give me a fresh perspective on my work.

What is your first thought when you hear the word Future?, What do you expect for?
My first thought is to panic. My second is to be excited. My third is to be confused. I am at a very early stage in my career and there is something both terrifying and exciting about not knowing what is to come next for me. I am confident, despite this that I will continue to create, learn, and be inspired by the world around me.
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