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Interview with Julia Walter

Interview
Published: 25.10.2012
Interview with Julia Walter.
Author:
Klimt02
Edited by:
Klimt02
Edited at:
Barcelona

Intro
Jewellery maker is the indian craftsman as well as the Louis Vuitton accessory designer, the gipsy gold melter as well as the academic jewellery artist. There are as many different intentions to make, wear or collect jewellery, as there are different concepts of life, culture, tradition.
Do you think that jewellery is being standardized?
People who wear jewellery have no common standard and wear it with different intentions, they embellish themselves, follow the fashion, wear an amulet for protection, wear symbols of love or friendship or family, show off their status in society or just have fun with something nice and beautiful. The makers have no common standard aswell, they call themselves artist or goldsmith or craftsman or designer. Jewellery maker is the indian craftsman as well as the Louis Vuitton accessory designer, the gipsy gold melter as well as the academic jewellery artist. There are as many different intentions to make, wear or collect jewellery, as there are different concepts of life, culture, tradition. 

What is there of local and universal in your artistic work?
Growing up in Central Europe certainly shapes the way how you perceive the world, I lived in a save place all my live, had a good education, was never starving and never had to be scared to loose my own life or my loved ones in war. Definitely that’s a reason why I am naturally optimistic and believe in the good, and why I can simply say that I´m mostly influenced by my direct surroundings, the city, my family, nature. Some aspects of jewellery might be universally understood but looking at the world right now, I sometimes think it would have been more reasonable to become a doctor, a farmer or a carpenter...

What do you expect when exposing your work to the public (for example with an exhibition)?
I guess if you create something, the next natural feeling is that you want your creation to be seen by someone else. Never the less I find it sometimes disturbing, how things are presented or received by the public, especially on fairs. I have this dream of my work just being handed over to the ideal wearer, the one who loves and appreciates it the most. The most comfortable exhibition I had, was in my studio about a year ago, it was a great atmosphere, friends coming by, trying on pieces while we had a little party. We even started trading things! I traded a pendant with rock crystals for a great helmet piece by Benedikt Fischer. 

Are other areas besides the jewellery, present in your work?
I am interested in sculpture, room installation, building, space, society. 

The last work, book, film, that has moved me was...
Some weeks ago I watched a documentary that felt like absurd theatre: Grey Gardens (1975) by Albert and David Maysels. It shows the isolated everyday life of Edith Ewing Bouvier Beale (aunt of Jaqueline Kennedy Onassis) and her daughter Edith Bouvier Beale. Mother and daughter, once socialites of high society, live at Grey Gardens, a decrepit mansion in East Hampton, NY. They lost their wealth decades ago and are somehow unable to really care for themselves or organize their lives.

A place, space, country whose creativity surprises me...
Traditional makers, craftsmanship that is passed on for generations, no matter from which country, and the freedom of children when they start expressing themselves. 

is there any designer, jeweller, artist, you appreciate a lot?
When I started studying, the first jewellery maker I was a big fan of, is Bernhard Schobinger. I found it so wild to drill holes in diamonds and use meteorites. His stories, his humour and his punk made me fall in love with jewellery making.
I admire the smartness, the chastity and irony, the respect towards the material of Volker Atrops, I like the Dada of Hans Stofer, I am a fan of the craziness of Karl Fritsch and Lisa Walker, I admire Warwick Freeman and Daniel Kruger for many reasons, especially for their great crafmanship, I really like how Barbara Schrobenhauser is able to transform one material into another dimension, i love the tricks Peter Bauhuis played in Munich 2011 with Der Galliumhort von Obertraun in the archeological museum, ...I could go on quite a while about jewellery makers I find interesting…
- generally, I like it if people take risks and put some magic in the materiality but do not loose touch to ground control.

What piece or work has given you the most satisfaction?
I don’t know what is more satisfying, the work process or the final piece -depends on my mood I guess. I don’t have a most satisfying work, most excited I am about my latest work.
Julia Walter. Necklace: Untitled, 2011. Silver, string. 65 cm. Julia Walter
Necklace: Untitled, 2011
Silver, string
65 cm
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Julia Walter. Piece: Untitled, 2012. Plywood, paint, rock crystal, cotton string. 17 x 11 x 5 cm. Amulet. Julia Walter
Piece: Untitled, 2012
Plywood, paint, rock crystal, cotton string
17 x 11 x 5 cm
Amulet
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Julia Walter. Brooch: Untitled, 2012. Wood, blackened brass, steel. 10 x 13 x 9 cm. Julia Walter
Brooch: Untitled, 2012
Wood, blackened brass, steel
10 x 13 x 9 cm
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
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