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Interview with Kristin Beeler

Interview  /  Artists
Published: 12.09.2013
Interview with Kristin Beeler.
Author:
Klimt02
Edited by:
Klimt02
Edited at:
Barcelona

Intro
I think there’s an interesting evolution and that there are current modes which may not make sense in ten or twenty years. But I love that there is a kind of permission granted now that didn’t exist before.
Do you think that jewelry is being standardized? What is there of local and universal in your artistic work?
I think there’s an interesting evolution and that there are current modes which may not make sense in ten or twenty years. But I love that there is a kind of permission granted now that didn’t exist before. In my work the local pivots on my own tiny personal memories and sensations. Those impressions are wrapped in an effort to find a common beauty, something that might break everyone’s heart equally.

What do you expect when exposing your work to the public (for example with an exhibition)?
My expectations sharing my work are rather low. My goal though is to first create an impression of wonder. I like wonder. And beneath that, I would hope to create some kind of itch. The kind where something gets stuck in your head and you can’t forget it. Something that stays with you whether you can see my piece or not because it has touched off a similar memory of yours. My image has now attached itself to yours, become yours. I like to keep my work pretty quiet, a little sneaky that way.

Are other areas besides the jewelry, present in your work?
Memory plays a large part. Physical memory. The sensations of an event, however small, that get recorded not just in the brain, but in the muscles, skin, hair. The little shiver that you might get when seeing ice form on an airplane window or feel spite from a lover. Or the way it feels when a spider web passes over your chest and arms.

The last work, book, film, that has moved me was...
The last film that I really needed to see was Pina from Wim Wenders. At one point I watched it everyday for a month trying to figure out what I was supposed to learn from it. I’m still not quite sure. The last book I bought from sheer covet was a book about the architecture of birds nests.

A place, space, country whose creativity surprises me...
Rather than a physical location I’m very inspired by two classes of objects: spoons and chairs. These are, for me, the most democratic objects based on the very simplest of human needs, food and rest. And yet the variety that can be found in these two simple forms gives me hope every day.

Is there any designer, jeweller, artist, you appreciate a lot?
I am a little bit in love with the work of Sigmar Polke, the thought process of Alain de Botton and the voice of Mariza. There are too many jewellers that have inspired, coddled and prodded me into motivation to name. But I might put Lalique close to the top.

What piece or work has given you the most satisfaction?
Usually it’s the last piece I made, until it’s the next one I make. But there was one piece a few years ago that was deeply satisfying in that I never felt I was making it. It sort of made itself and I was just there to hold the tools. The imagery, the material, the form, everything came together exactly right with no thought. At first, I didn’t value the piece very much because it all seemed too easy. Later, I realized it might have been the best piece I ever made for exactly that reason.
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