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Interview with Lauren Tickle

Interview  /  ArtistsBehind the Scenes
Published: 04.06.2015
Interview with Lauren Tickle.
Author:
Klimt02
Edited at:
Barcelona
Edited on:
2015

Intro
I wrestle with the question of whether to respect the craft of jewelry and luxury goods more broadly or whether to dislike the ostentatious show of wealth they represent.

 
Do you think that jewellery is being standardized? What is there of local and universal in your artistic work?
I believe that certain rules of jewelry making will always be a standardized. How does it look on the body? What is its function? How can I question the ideals/ideas of what jewelry is? It is impossible to get away from the root of jewelry's technical side. Even if you are working against those constructs you are still assessing the public’s standards of craftsmanship, materials, universal and personal aesthetics.  For me, jewelry gets interesting when it is worn.  People's reactions, interactions, and interpretation will vary from both the wearer and observer. These are personal experiences that cannot be standardized. Universally, money makes the world go round.  Charles Goodhart's "Cartalist" theory of money points out that the establishment of currency was a necessary approach of governments to enable their citizens to trade and exchange goods easily, store value, and establish a way to measure value precisely, which enabled taxation.  Modern society is built on currency acting as a commodity, and after reflecting on what I had done to this point in my work, I realized that I needed to challenge that fundamental notion of currency as a commodity.
 
What do you expect when exposing your work to the public (for example with an exhibition)?
I am always asked, “is it legal”? Today, I'm pleading the fifth on this question.
 
Are other areas besides the jewellery, present in your work?
Of course.  Maybe not in this particular series but I have made large-scale drawings and objects before.  I never want to limit myself to just making jewelry, I want my subject matter to dictate the format for the artwork I am making. 
 
The last work, book, film, city that has moved me was…
Book – Beneath the Surface By John Hargrove or Empire of the Summer Moon: Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History By S. C. Gwynne
 City—anywhere in Iceland
 
A place, space, country whose creativity surprises me...
A kindergarten classroom. These youngsters are so intelligent I don't think we value their fresh outlook, creativity, imagination, and drive to understand everything in our world.  This kind of critical thinking and explorative nature is lost with the pressure of standard tests and the need to always be “right”.
 
Is there any designer, jeweller, artist, you appreciate a lot?
Kim Buck has said “My education as a goldsmith is the basis for everything that I do. I am in a very traditional trade that l both respect and dislike – my recent work reflects these contrasting feelings and mechanisms.” His sly titles and his well crafted pieces have a playful nature while still being very poignant.  I also wrestle with the question of whether to respect the craft of jewelry and luxury goods more broadly or whether to dislike the ostentatious show of wealth they represent.
 
What piece or work has given you the most satisfaction?
That is a really hard question to answer.  Each piece gives me satisfaction in the moment but I am like every artist - as I evolve so does my work and my most recent work often becomes my favorite until the next. I love how my new pieces are completely rooted in gothic architecture. This kind of visual imagery is very striking and rooted in history just like the dollar bill. Gothic architecture has captivating beauty (like frosting on a cake), which makes you almost forget its structural function. While there are numerals and text, as well as Washington’s face on one side of the dollar bill, I have cut them out and only use the line elements, so from that side of the bill, it becomes unrecognizable in my pieces that they are made of currency. The reverse side, with the green filigree, symbols and words associated with the dollar bill are more recognizable.
 
Do you read Jewellery Magazines? What is your source to get information?
I love lectures.  I find they are the best way to grasp what the artist is really trying to express within their work. You can see their journey; successes, failures, and most importantly, see how they problem solve. I also believe subject matter rather than just form should be studied.  Limiting this could be problematic to artists.  
 
Do you discuss your work with other jewellery artists or any other person?
Living in Brooklyn, I have a great jewelry/artist network. I am lucky that I live close to artists that I can always bounce ideas off of in and outside of my field. There may be too much art to look at! In June 2014, I had the opportunity to participate in an artist residency in Iceland.  During this time I worked closely with other artists, as well as two in our field Märta Mattsson and Amy Tavern, in a completely different environment. It was the best thing I have ever done, both personally and professionally.  It revitalized my work’s direction/aesthetic and myself.
 
What is your first thought when you hear the word Future? What do you expect for?
The future is full of potential. Not knowing is when you make the best observations and discoveries. There’s no moment better than the present so let’s get to work.
 
Lauren Tickle. Necklace: $192.00 Dollars, Currency Converted, 2015. US Dollars, silver, and monofilament. 28 x 30 x 3 cm. From series: Increasing Value. Lauren Tickle
Necklace: $192.00 Dollars, Currency Converted, 2015
US Dollars, silver, and monofilament
28 x 30 x 3 cm
From series: Increasing Value
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Lauren Tickle. Brooch: $30.00 USD and unknown amount of US dollar scraps, Currency Converted, 2015. US Dollars, Silver, Monofilament, and Surgical Steel. 12.7 x 12.7 x 2 cm. From series: Increasing Value. Lauren Tickle
Brooch: $30.00 USD and unknown amount of US dollar scraps, Currency Converted, 2015
US Dollars, Silver, Monofilament, and Surgical Steel
12.7 x 12.7 x 2 cm
From series: Increasing Value
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
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