Back
Open Call Preziosa Young 2017 skyscraper.

Interview with Selina Woulfe

Interview  /  Artists
Published: 15.03.2013
Interview with Selina Woulfe.
Author:
Klimt02
Edited by:
Klimt02
Edited at:
Barcelona

Intro
There is a performative aspect to my work which is not always conveyed through the jewellery object on it’s own, so I tend to use photography and video to document the interaction between the body and adornment. The photograph in a way becomes a second skin bearing the evidence of a jewellery ritual, while a video allows the viewer to see the physical process.
Do you think that jewellery is being standardized?
To a degree, yes, but this happens across all creative fields. Each new generation of artists are often influenced by the same events, issues and technologies that are specific to their time and place in the world. It comes down to each artist’s individual interpretation of these influences that define their originality and ingenuity.

What is there of local and universal in your artistic work?
My own work is concerned with the body and its politics, a typically universal theme, however it’s localized because I reference my personal cultural heritage and draw inspiration from ritualistic Pacific traditions.

What do you expect when exposing your work to the public?
I don’t necessarily expect anything, but I hope that my work provokes some kind of reaction from viewers, whether it is positive or negative. It’s great when someone desires a piece to wear, or own a photograph, but ultimately I want my work to encourage discussion, self-reflection and curiosity.

Are other areas besides the jewellery, present in your work?
There is a performative aspect to my work which is not always conveyed through the jewellery object on it’s own, so I tend to use photography and video to document the interaction between the body and adornment. The photograph in a way becomes a second skin bearing the evidence of a jewellery ritual, while a video allows the viewer to see the physical process. The filming of jewellery in action is something I will be delving further in to, later this year.

The last work, book, or film that has moved you?
Most recently I have been intrigued by the visceral poetry of Delmira Augustini (1886-1914 Uruguay). Filled with dark, sensual imagery, her poems were written in a very different era from our own but her words transcend time, place and culture to create a dialogue which is still relevant today.

A place, space or country whose creativity surprises you?
I can’t pinpoint somewhere in particular, but from what I’ve come across so far, I am most surprised and impressed by the creativity of those who have little resources to work with. Whether it is creating a temporary shelter or a piece of body adornment; a lack of materials often pushes one’s imagination.

Is there a designer, jeweller, artist that you appreciate a lot?
Orlan, Thomas Andrew, Lisa Reihana, Kiki Smith, Gustav Klimt, Tamara de Lempicka, Louise Bourgeois, Greg Semu, Renee Bevan, Nagi Noda, and so many more! However I particularly appreciate Peter Deckers for invigorating the New Zealand contemporary jewellery community with his many works and projects including ‘Handshake’. Gerd Rothmann is also one of my absolute favourite jewellers for making the controversial but beautifully mesmerizing, cast nipple-disk necklaces.

What piece or work has given you the most satisfaction?
‘Experiential Jewellery’ is the work that has given me the most satisfaction. It was such a huge task researching the logistics of body piercing, and organizing the photographing and filming of the work. I also had to trust a professional piercer with not just my own body, but also my friend and fellow jeweller, Gillian Deery’s body. Originally I was not going to do something so invasive, but then came to the conclusion that the concept of the work would be undermined if the jewellery could only make reference to a kind of experience. It’s not my favourite work aesthetically and I find it quite unnerving to look at now, but ‘Experiential Jewellery’ is the project that represents the moment I chose to take a risk physically, mentally and artistically.
Selina Woulfe. Piece: Experiential Jewellery I, 2008. Sterling silver, surgical steel. Selina Woulfe
Piece: Experiential Jewellery I, 2008
Sterling silver, surgical steel
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Selina Woulfe. Piece: Experiential Jewellery IV, 2008. Sterling silver, surgical steel suspension hook. Selina Woulfe
Piece: Experiential Jewellery IV, 2008
Sterling silver, surgical steel suspension hook
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Appreciate APPRECIATE