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Interview with Tiffany Parbs

Interview  /  Artists
Published: 01.05.2014
Interview with Tiffany Parbs.
Author:
Klimt02
Edited by:
Klimt02
Edited at:
Barcelona

Intro
The nature of how I work means each project presents it’s own unique challenges and set of problems to solve. The works that give me the most satisfaction are usually the last pieces I have resolved and completed.
Do you think that jewellery is being standardized? What is there of local and universal in your artistic work?
I don’t think that contemporary jewellery is necessarily becoming standardized as there seems a huge diversity of approaches present within the sector, but I do get disheartened when I see jewellers continually producing formulaic works that limit the possible potential for their practice. In terms of the universal in my work, one of the reasons I normally do not show my entire face in my work is the idea of presenting a fragmented, universal body which others can more readily identify with.

What do you expect when exposing your work to the public (for example with an exhibition)
The main intention behind my work is to invite the viewer to think further about the objects they allow into their intimate space.  I rely on a shared visual language between myself and the viewer, an existing common ground I can realign and reposition to create alternate expectations of shared knowledge and experience. However, I'm realistic enough to realise there are so many different factors that come into play when people view artwork that I can never really exert a controlling influence how my pieces will be interpreted once they are placed in the public arena. 

Are other areas besides the jewellery, present in your work?
The pieces I make are conceived from a place of personal narrative; they reflect the specific moment in time they are created, topics I am drawn to researching, and responses to changes in the social or political landscape.

The last work, book, film, that has moved me was...
While not a film, book or artwork, the most recent experience which really moved me was seeing the Japanese-born London-based four-piece psyche punk band Bo Ningen live, I felt my chest expand out past my rib cage and completely drowned in the music.

A place, space, country whose creativity surprises me...
Iceland – it’s such an amazing hub of creativity and inspiration with artists making really thought provoking work.

Is there any designer, jeweller, artist, you appreciate a lot?
There’s a host of people whose work I admire and respect but perhaps the jewellers and artists who have influenced me the most over the years include Susan Cohn, Catherine Truman & Sue Lorraine from Gray St Workshop, Emmy van Leersum and Gijs Bakker, Otto Künzli, Leigh Bowery, Rebecca Horn, Mona Hatoum and Lygia Clark.

What piece or work has given you the most satisfaction?
The nature of how I work means each project presents it’s own unique challenges and set of problems to solve. The works that give me the most satisfaction are usually the last pieces I have resolved and completed.
Appreciate APPRECIATE