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I let these objects live their own life. Malgorzata Kalinska won the Overseas Division Prize at The Japan Jewellery Competition 2020

Interview  /  AnnaSado   Artists   Awards
Published: 19.06.2020
Małgorzata Kalińska Małgorzata Kalińska
Author:
Anna Sado
Edited by:
Klimt02
Edited at:
Barcelona
Edited on:
2020
Małgorzata Kalińska. Brooch: Brooch V, 2020. Silver, resin.. 7 x 9 x 5.5 cm. From series: Intentionality and Unintentionality. Małgorzata Kalińska
Brooch: Brooch V, 2020
Silver, resin.
7 x 9 x 5.5 cm
From series: Intentionality and Unintentionality
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.

Intro
In our modern world, we begin to feel a glut of perfections - perfect products and high-street personalities, repeatable in an infinite number of identical copies, becoming instantly available, common and cheap. Our eternal longing for individuality and uniqueness stimulate us to search in areas where imperfection, error or defect are annexed as a full-fledged medium of expression.
Congratulations on your latest award at The Japan Jewellery Competition 2020!
Thank you! I received an award in the Overseas Division for international artists. Participating in the most important, Japanese Jewellery Competition was a challenge and also a personal confrontation with my ideals. Therefore, this recognition is exceptionally valuable to me. I have always admired the specific purity of Japanese Design and I tried to reflect it in my creations. The greater joy when I found out that the winning jewellery objects will be presented at Tokyo Metropolitan Art Museum in June this year.


Can you tell us more about the Jewellery that won the competition, are those objects from your current collection?
Yes, they are. My latest collection is called Intentionality and Unintentionality and it is a small part of my PhD -dissertation that I am currently working on. For many years I’ve been active in two areas of art, in abstract painting and in jewellery design - two completely opposite forms of expression and craftsmanship. Naturally, I came to the point where I wanted to combine both. The jewellery is a domain of rigour and discipline but painting is a world of emotions and intuition. I began searching for means of expressing an intuitive spontaneity in a solid matter. And I asked myself how do I translate the painting gesture, an error and a chance into the spatial form of a jewellery object? Tricky question. Finding that adequate matter, to begin with, was a real challenge. I was experimenting with various materials to finally decide on polyurethane resins. I found many common features between them and acrylic paints. Resins allow you to build spatial forms with soft, round, biomorphic shapes, maintaining a specific lightness but they are quite difficult to control and then the process of colouring and dyeing to obtain translucent effects are almost painterly challenges.


Brooch: Brooch I, 2020, Silver, resin, steel., 8 x 7 x 5 cm, From series: Intentionality and Unintentionality


Although the resins in jewelry are nothing new, your forms are. Did it take you a long time to develop the sculpting method?
It took me countless evenings of summer, autumn, winter and spring in a time-frame of the last two years to find that effect I have been looking for. Although now, I have a good understanding and can manage their matter quite well, I let these objects live their own life, I allow the error or accident factor during the making process. I refer to the painting techniques in which only as a result of releasing the mind from existing schemes, habits or routines, the element of the subconscious can emerge and come to play. I applied the same principle in the case of resin forms - it is creativity in pure form, like painting or sculpting, when you "talk” with the matter. I find it a kind of unique phenomenon.


Usually, we try to avoid errors, accidents, chance, a painting gesture - how do you understand and work with them?
For me, errors and accidents are coherent, interpenetrating concepts. When painting a picture - I don't think about the finished product, I stop describing what I see, I begin to depict what is hidden inside - I let free what lies deep in the subconscious. It is a moment when both layers of what’s known and unknown creatively meet each other. And it’s all transferred on the canvas via what we call a painting gesture, a creative and emotional expression. During the release of this expression, often the unpredictable happens and the randomness manifests itself. In our natural life is certain only, from birth to death, and what happens in the meantime is a constant threat of failing - we are exposed to risks and only our survival instincts and awareness allow us to avoid a total failure. Thanks to the art we have all tools to most fully express emotions of our fears and joy. That’s how I see the ideal, the wholeness contains all aspects, perfection and defect.


Is that what makes your Jewellery unique?
In our modern world, we begin to feel a glut of perfections - perfect products and high-street personalities, repeatable in an infinite number of identical copies, becoming instantly available, common and cheap. Our eternal longing for individuality and uniqueness stimulate us to search in areas where imperfection, error or defect are annexed as a full-fledged medium of expression.


If so then where is the defect in your jewellery? These forms give the impression of being deliberately created, almost perfect.
As for the jewellery that I submitted to the competition in Japan, of course, that it has glitches, only cleverly hidden or turned into an asset. This is what I mean, I give myself the right to make a mistake and consciously take advantage of it. A disclosure of random events in the course of work always opens up new possibilities of creative ways and brings desired value. I have never been resistant to change, rather eager to search for new solutions, but what I feel now can be compared to the volcano explosion, in which everything accumulated for a very long time. It feels to me that this Japanese award is just a prelude to what will happen next.

About the Interviewee

Małgorzata Kalińska, born in 1963 in Warsaw, Poland, is a multidisciplinary artist specialising in painting and jewellery design. She has graduated at the Jewellery Design department of the Academy of Fine Arts in Lodz where she received a scholarship of the Polish Minister of Culture and National Heritage. Her work was exhibited in many collective and individual exhibitions of painting and contemporary jewellery. She is currently working on a PhD dissertation.

About the author


Anna Sado is a journalist living and working in Warsaw, Poland. She began her career in a jewellery industry working as an editor-in-chief for the trade magazine Watches & Jewellery. She has been collaborating as a spokesperson with the leading jewellery fairs in Poland. Anna is currently running an online magazine Amber Portal amber.com.pl - dedicated to the baltic amber and promoting talented jewelry designers. Her articles have been published in the German "Goldschmiede Zeitung" (GZ), Lithuanian "Baltic Jewelery News" and in lifestyle and fashion magazines in Poland. 

Contact: ania.sado77@gmail.com


 
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