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Interview to Carole Guinard

Interview  /  Behind the ScenesDebates
Published: 22.05.2015
Interview to Carole Guinard.
Author:
Paulo Ribeiro
Edited at:
klimt02
Edited on:
2015
Susanne Klemm. Neckpiece: Frozen, 2007. Polyolefin. 38 x 38 x 7 cm. Photo by: Marie Humair. Part of: MUDAC's collection. Located at the MUDAC Museum. Susanne Klemm
Neckpiece: Frozen, 2007
Polyolefin
38 x 38 x 7 cm
Photo by: Marie Humair
Part of: MUDAC's collection
Located at the MUDAC Museum
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.

Intro
The Museum of Design in Barcelona, DHUB, will host (1-18 October 20015) the contemporary jewelry collections of MUDAC and the Swiss Confederation through an exhibition called “Bijoux en jeu”. With the occasion of this exhibition Paulo Ribeiro, director of JOYA Barcelona, interviews Carol Guinard, Head of the contemporary jewelry collections at MUDAC, musée de design et d’arts appliqués contemporains in Lausanne.

 
 
The MUDAC jewellery collection is one of the most important worldwide, when did you decide to create specifically Bijoux en Jeu as an exhibition?
First of all it is an important collection of Swiss contemporary jewelry: more than 280 pieces by 37 contemporary jewelry designers, mostly Swiss. Bijoux en jeu was first conceived as a catalogue of our jewelry collections. The first works were bought during the ‘80s. The oldest pieces were created in 1962, the newest in 2013. They are presented thematically in the catalogue, following chapters such as Telling, Adorning, Using, Shaping, Making. In fact, this system of deciphering jewelry seemed the best way to bring together certain creators and present their works more subtly than along chronological or alphabetical lines. The idea of making an exhibition came logically afterwards.

 
Bijoux en Jeu is the combination of two important Swiss collections: The Swiss Confederation and the MUDAC jewellery collection, what was the criteria for choosing the pieces that are part of this exhibition?
The field for jewelry pieces is vast, so that the criteria for their acquisition must lend them a certain coherence. Those added to our collection have been evaluated on the basis of their creativity, on how well they reflect current trends, the research aspects of innovation and continuity, and the nationality of their creator. The Swiss Confederation’s Collection is built up especially with an eye to the winners or experts designated by the Swiss Federal Design Competition, a competition which has been encouraging young Swiss creators since 1918. The MUDAC`S Collection encompasses, among others, pieces created in small series, highlighting a creative process which is similar to design. Acquisitions spanning several years now ensure that the two collections are complementary. Likewise, in some cases the policy has been to acquire several pieces by one and the same creator, in order to illustrate the evolution of his or her work. The works inspired by the minimalist movements of the 70s are represented, as well as the more expressive “author’s jewelry”. Photography, videos, installations or performances are also included. In addition, pieces by today’s emerging creators have been welcomed into the collection.
 
 
What the assistants will see at the exhibition is the reflection of Swiss art jewellery history or is an international exhibition? Or a combination of both?
Most of the creators represented in our collections are Swiss. Their work is highly representative of a movement whose genesis is to be found in the Europe of some fifty years ago. These creators have never worked in isolation and links have been established between European and Swiss galleries and between Swiss and European jewelers. The large shows of contemporary jewelry in London, Munich or other places have fostered meetings and exchanges. It is interesting to note that Swiss creators can be found everywhere. Many are to be found teaching in Germany, England, France and Sweden or having been invited to lead workshops in Australian or Japanese schools.

 
This is the first time the collection is coming to DHUB in Barcelona, how do you think it would relate to JOYA Barcelona Art Jewellery Fair? What do you think would be the reaction of the Spanish audience?
There certainly will be links between the works shown on both places. I do hope that people visiting JOYA Barcelona Art Jewelry Fair will enjoy going from one place to the other to discover the variety of works shown in Bijoux en jeu.

 
After exhibiting in DHUB Barcelona, are you planning to promote Bijoux en Jeu in other countries?
Showing Bijoux en jeu in Barcelona is a wonderful opportunity. For the future, nothing is planned, but one can always dream.



About the exhibition:
 

JOYA Barcelona Art Jewellery Fair and the Museum of Design (DHUB) in an effort to boost the jewelry art in the city have the honor to host the exhibition Bijoux Jeu based on the permanent collection of the Musée de design et d’arts appliqués contemporains (MUDAC) and the Swiss Confederation will be sponsored by Pro Helvetia, Swiss Arts Council.
 
The collection started in the 80s. The acquisition of the pieces is based on criteria such as creativity, representation of current trends, innovation, research and originality.
 
MUDAC collection includes, among other things, pieces made in small series, highlighting the work of designer creations, meanwhile the collection of the Swiss Confederation brings the beauty and wisdom of established artists. Both collections are complementary.
 
Bijoux Jeu exhibition will present about 280 pieces and will review the creation of the Swiss contemporary jewelry in the last thirty years.
 
The exhibition will take just 1 to October 18 at the premises of DHUB, Museum of Design in Barcelona, ​​in collaboration with the A-FAD as part of the calendar of activities JOYA 2015  prepared for this edition.


 
Natalie Luder. Necklace: 125 lapins, 2005-2006. Rabbit teeth, silk thread. 30 x 35 cm. Photo by: Artaud Conne AN. Part of: Swiss Confederation’s collection. Located at the MUDAC Museum. Natalie Luder
Necklace: 125 lapins, 2005-2006
Rabbit teeth, silk thread
30 x 35 cm
Photo by: Artaud Conne AN
Part of: Swiss Confederation’s collection
Located at the MUDAC Museum
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Sophie Hanagarth. Neckpiece: Putto, 2013. Pure iron, gilded brass, rope. 65 x 35 x 2.5 cm. Photo by: Corinne Janier. Part of: Swiss Confederation’s collection. Located at the MUDAC Museum. Sophie Hanagarth
Neckpiece: Putto, 2013
Pure iron, gilded brass, rope
65 x 35 x 2.5 cm
Photo by: Corinne Janier
Part of: Swiss Confederation’s collection
Located at the MUDAC Museum
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
David Bielander. Neckpiece: Snake, 2007. Oxydised silver. 85 cm. Photo by: Simon Bielander. Part of: Swiss Confederation’s collection. Located at the MUDAC Museum. David Bielander
Neckpiece: Snake, 2007
Oxydised silver
85 cm
Photo by: Simon Bielander
Part of: Swiss Confederation’s collection
Located at the MUDAC Museum
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Andi Gut. Brooch: Mimesen, 2003. Gold, nylon. 15 x 9.5 x 3 cm. Photo by: Arya Dil cepv. Part of: MUDAC's collection. Located at the MUDAC Museum. Andi Gut
Brooch: Mimesen, 2003
Gold, nylon
15 x 9.5 x 3 cm
Photo by: Arya Dil cepv
Part of: MUDAC's collection
Located at the MUDAC Museum
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Sonia Morel. Bracelet: Untitled, 1999. Oxydised silver. Ø 7 x 4.5 cm. Photo by: Sylviane Pittet AN. Part of: MUDAC's collection. Located at the MUDAC Museum. Sonia Morel
Bracelet: Untitled, 1999
Oxydised silver
Ø 7 x 4.5 cm
Photo by: Sylviane Pittet AN
Part of: MUDAC's collection
Located at the MUDAC Museum
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
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