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Emily Watson

Jeweller
Published: 09.01.2014
Emily Watson. Brooch: Peace, 2012. Faux bone, wood, reconstituted stone, silver. 2.75” x 2.25” x .35”. Emily Watson
Brooch: Peace, 2012
Faux bone, wood, reconstituted stone, silver
2.75” x 2.25” x .35”
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Emily Watson. Brooch: Littlest Birds, 2011. Wood, amethyst, argentium silver, sterling silver. 2.3” x 3.5” x .6”. Emily Watson
Brooch: Littlest Birds, 2011
Wood, amethyst, argentium silver, sterling silver
2.3” x 3.5” x .6”
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Emily Watson. Brooch: Coral Simulachrum, 2012. Acrylic, reconstituted stone, sponge coral, silver. 2.25” x 5.25” x .6”. Emily Watson
Brooch: Coral Simulachrum, 2012
Acrylic, reconstituted stone, sponge coral, silver
2.25” x 5.25” x .6”
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Emily Watson. Brooch: Carbonated Ivory, 2012. Faux bone, simulated ivory, metal composite, silver. 3” x 1.25” x .5”. Emily Watson
Brooch: Carbonated Ivory, 2012
Faux bone, simulated ivory, metal composite, silver
3” x 1.25” x .5”
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Emily Watson. Brooch: Turquoise Bubbles, 2012. Faux bone, reconstituted stone, silver. 3.15” x 1.25” x .5”. Emily Watson
Brooch: Turquoise Bubbles, 2012
Faux bone, reconstituted stone, silver
3.15” x 1.25” x .5”
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Emily Watson. Necklace: Green Buds, 2012. Resin clay, paint, lacquer, silver. 23” x 1.5” x .75”. Emily Watson
Necklace: Green Buds, 2012
Resin clay, paint, lacquer, silver
23” x 1.5” x .75”
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Emily Watson. Ring: Untitled, 2011. Acrylics, vintage bakelite. 2” x .75” x .25” largest one. Emily Watson
Ring: Untitled, 2011
Acrylics, vintage bakelite
2” x .75” x .25” largest one
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Emily Watson. Earrings: Bubble Resonance, 2011. Corian, bowling ball plastic, silver. 2.25” x .5” x .5”. Emily Watson
Earrings: Bubble Resonance, 2011
Corian, bowling ball plastic, silver
2.25” x .5” x .5”
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Emily Watson. Necklace: Algae Bloom, 2012. Enamel, copper, silver, chrysocolla with malachite, agate, paint. 12.5” x 2.5” x .5”. Emily Watson
Necklace: Algae Bloom, 2012
Enamel, copper, silver, chrysocolla with malachite, agate, paint
12.5” x 2.5” x .5”
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Emily Watson. Necklace: Rendered no. 7, 2010. Enamel, copper, silver. 2.5” x 2.5” x .15” pendant. Emily Watson
Necklace: Rendered no. 7, 2010
Enamel, copper, silver
2.5” x 2.5” x .15” pendant
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Emily Watson. Brooch: Rendered no. 1, 2007. Enamel, copper, silver. 3.5” x 2.25” x .15”. Emily Watson
Brooch: Rendered no. 1, 2007
Enamel, copper, silver
3.5” x 2.25” x .15”
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Emily Watson. Brooch: Rendered no. 4, 2007. Enamel, copper, silver. 5” x 2.25” x .15”. Emily Watson
Brooch: Rendered no. 4, 2007
Enamel, copper, silver
5” x 2.25” x .15”
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Emily Watson. Brooch: Rendered no. 10, 2007. Enamel, copper, silver. 6” x 3.25” x .15”. Emily Watson
Brooch: Rendered no. 10, 2007
Enamel, copper, silver
6” x 3.25” x .15”
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Emily Watson. Brooch: Rendered no. 15, 2008. Enamel, copper, silver, glass beads. 3.8” x 2” x .15”. Emily Watson
Brooch: Rendered no. 15, 2008
Enamel, copper, silver, glass beads
3.8” x 2” x .15”
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Emily Watson. Brooch: Rendered no. 16, 2008. Enamel, copper, silver. 2.35” x 2.35” x .15”. Emily Watson
Brooch: Rendered no. 16, 2008
Enamel, copper, silver
2.35” x 2.35” x .15”
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.

Statement

My vision when creating jewelry is based on what I would want to wear. The pieces tend to be larger in scale, with a solid weight that allows them to withstand daily wear. I seek to create work that is bold, attention-getting, and expressive while still retaining an elegant simplicity. While I may repeat certain design elements or create variations on them, the process of hand-soldering, hand-carving, and hand-finishing every piece ensures that each one is unique.

Inspired by geography, anatomy, and natural mimicry, my work in vitreous enamel combines subtle fields of color with hand-drawn elements. Each piece is meticulously finished to create a rich stone-like surface quite different from conventional enamel work, and is then combined with sterling silver constructions and handmade findings.

This interest in texture, surface, and touch-ability carries over to my carved pieces, which blend unconventional materials with traditional ones, old with new, precious with non-precious. I am an enthusiastic traveler, and collect bits and pieces of exotic materials whenever possible. I also believe in saving materials that might otherwise be discarded, and transforming them into something new. I have worked with cut-offs of counter top materials from kitchen installations, wood scraps from furniture building, pieces of vulcanite and meerschaum discarded by retiring pipe makers, and chunks of bakelite sourced from defunct costume jewelry manufacturers. Other materials I consistently use include: faux bone plastic, acrylic, bowling ball plastic, bone, horn, fossilized mammoth bone, synthetic opal, semi-precious stone, reconstituted stone, vintage amber, jet, and resin. By combining materials I create tableaux of texture and color in which disperse media mimic and complement one another

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