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Talente 2021 Exhibition. A Must See Show on Applied Arts and Technology. 101 Works by 101 Artists. Only at Klimt02

Exhibition  /  MunichJewelleryWeek2021   OnlineOnly  /  10 Mar 2021  -  10 Mar 2022
Published: 15.02.2021
Talente 2021 Exhibition. A Must See Show on Applied Arts and Technology. 101 Works by 101 Artists. Only at Klimt02.
Internationale Handwerkmesse Munich
Management:
Wolfgang Lösche, Michaela Braesel
.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.

Intro
Here you can see the exhibition of Talente 2021: 101 works of the 101 selected participants. Online Only at Klimt02. Now available to be requested to purchase.

One of the most important selections of the year in the field of arts and crafts. Here in this online item you can observe and enjoy the discovery of new materials, innovation in treatments, and an artistic vision that makes these works the vanguard of what is to come and we still do not know.

Talente, a special show organized into the Handwerk & Design exhibition is an annual competition for new talent in the areas of design and technology. Young artists working in the applied arts and technology will have the opportunity to show their work in the international competition TALENTE every year in Munich.

The Talente exhibition planned from 10 to 14 March 2021, has been canceled due to the continued restrictions in place to contain the coronavirus pandemic.


 

Artist list

Enis Akiev, Ryota Akiyama, Rose Armstrong, Emma Baker, Merlin Bally, May Bar Levav, Marleen Clara Bauer, Diana Bilichenko, Mikuláš Brukner, Mikuláš Brukner, Leonie Burkhardt, Fridolin Bär, David Bühler, Fanny Casano, Aphra Cheesman, Minyeol Cho, Daniela Chodilova, Giorgi Danibegashvili, Dennis Demand, Tamar Dgani, Lea Dievenow, Sabina Dragusanu, Jakob Eichner, Vendula Fabianova, Emanuele Ferraro, Jakob Frank, Justine Gaignault, Brice Garrett, Amit Giladi, Ruth Gilmour, Shalvah Gottlieb, Amelie Graf, Louis Grant, Meytar Hacham, Luisa-Maria Heindl, Sophie Herz, Sara Howard, Maximilian Jüttner, Steven KP, Jing Ting Kao, Alischa Kilburg, Dowon Kim, Hanna Kim, Jiye Kim, Melis Kiran, Pavlína Končická, Triin Kukk, Josephine Larsen, Anette Leegaard Fuhlendorff, Aron Li, Felicia Li, Tianyi Liang, Valerie Likhacheva, Keng-Hung Lin, Xin Liu, Karolina Muncheskul, Ramona Myrseth, Johannes Müller, Jonsson Nellie, Oliver Neu, Henrieke Neumeyer, Heidi Nicholson, Jonas Niedermann, Vele Ondřej, Annie Parnell, Annora Poppe, Nonna Postolenko, Luisa Pratsch, Paula Repp Alvarez, Yaiza Rodríguez Sánchez, Johanna Stella Rogalla, Davide Ronco, Mus Ruijg, Szilvia Zita Rémiás, Louis Rösner, Nadja Kim Schlenker, Thalea Schmalenberg, Diego Schmid, Anna Schmideder, Dominyka Sidabraite, Jiwon Song, Zhifeng Song, Sveti Spivak, Vaia Tatopoulou, Nata Togliatti, Kazuhiro Toyama, Molly Turner, Tim Udvardi-Lakos, Paloma Vega, Theresa Viogt, Karina Vodovoz, Elena Vogel, I-An Wang, Robin Wolf, Hikari Yamaguchi, Yui Yamaguchi, Jiwon Yang, Heesong Yoo, Sungkyung Yoon, Elisa Zorraquin, Maartje van Dijck, Tim van der Loo

This year more than 500 applications from over 50 countries were received in spite of the difficult situation and it was a very difficult task to come to a decision and a selection.
In 2021, “Talente” presents works by 101 young craftsmen, artists, and designers from 31 countries in 13 different material groups. This year there are also works by participants from Argentina, China, Estonia, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Latvia, Lithuania, Romania, Taiwan, and Ukraine. “Talente” shows innovative, imaginative, extraordinary, and very different works, especially in the areas of glass, ceramics, jewelry, and textiles. The many applications in the field of textiles reflect the huge interest in textiles and fashion, which in recent years has also shown itself in exhibitions, discussions, and studies, particularly concerning the aspect of sustainability and alternative materials.

Accordingly, “Talente” presents a large number of works that deal with material investigations and research. This involves reusing existing and processed materials such as leather, textiles, industrial and plastic waste. At the same time, it is about the development of new packaging materials that are biodegradable in order to reduce the amount of plastic waste.
 
A major theme of the fashion exhibits are knitted garments with elaborate, complicated, shaping patterns. The technology is consciously exploited for the contrast of dense areas and loose, transparent areas.
All in all, an interesting and diverse selection has emerged that shows how young artists, craftsmen, and designers are dealing with contemporary, topical issues. The aim is to reflect on various contents, to design functional, aesthetically convincing objects, to update traditions, and to strive for more sustainability and the considered use of materials.

The focus of the competition is on work that shines through its formal and technical originality and technical perfection and is ahead of its time. The competition is being organised by the Munich and Upper Bavarian Chamber of Skilled Trades and jointly sponsored by the Federal Ministry of Economics and Energy and the Bavarian State Ministry for Economics and Media, Energy and Technology. „Talente“ takes place every year as a special exhibition during the Munich International Skilled Trades Fair in March.


Organisation:
Organisation: Michaela Braesel, Handwerkskammer für München und Oberbayern.
Management: Wolfgang Lösche, Handwerkskammer für München und Oberbayern.
 
Karina Vodovoz. Textile: Fire, 2019. Mohair. 170 x 60 x 2 cm. Photo by: Ariel Medina. 
. Karina Vodovoz’s works are inspired by the elements to which they refer in their respective colours. They are hand-knitted from mohair and decorated with various relief patterns - a wide variety of braided and ribbed patterns. In these textures, Karina Vodovoz refers to ruins, vegetation, and organic structures that form a story of decay and regrowth. For her, the clothes act as a kind of futuristic archaeological find, a reflection of the future and the past. At the same time, her work also serves as a critique of a society shaped by capitalism and consumption and its value systems and priorities, which allow famine, epidemics, and wars.
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.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Karina Vodovoz
Textile: Fire, 2019
Mohair
170 x 60 x 2 cm
Photo by: Ariel Medina

Karina Vodovoz’s works are inspired by the elements to which they refer in their respective colours. They are hand-knitted from mohair and decorated with various relief patterns - a wide variety of braided and ribbed patterns. In these textures, Karina Vodovoz refers to ruins, vegetation, and organic structures that form a story of decay and regrowth. For her, the clothes act as a kind of futuristic archaeological find, a reflection of the future and the past. At the same time, her work also serves as a critique of a society shaped by capitalism and consumption and its value systems and priorities, which allow famine, epidemics, and wars.

 
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Enis Akiev. Object: Plastic Stone Tiles, 2018. PP, LDPE.. 9 x 9 cm. Photo by: KISD Fotostudio. 
. The tiles in the “Plastic Stone Tiles – the nature of waste”-project are made from post-consumer plastic waste. The starting point of the project was the question of the nature of waste and the subjective definition of this term, especially in relation to another term – that of resources. For Enis Akiev, waste is initially unused material. Most of the waste ends up in the sea, where under natural influences plastiglomerate is formed – a combination of plastic and natural geological components, ultimately a new type of rock. Based on this, Enis Akiev investigated rock-forming processes and developed methods to give light packaging waste a natural-looking, rock-like structure. Her aim is to change the perception of waste and show its special aesthetics by focusing on post-consumer plastic waste. This increases the value of the single-use packaging waste and transforms it into an aesthetically pleasing, durable material. With her work, she would at the same time like to encourage people to reflect more about the possible uses of waste, especially in view of the decline in natural resources. The result of her project is attractive tiles of great diversity in terms of colour and pattern structure, which allow different types of rock to be associated.
. 
.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Enis Akiev
Object: Plastic Stone Tiles, 2018
PP, LDPE.
9 x 9 cm
Photo by: KISD Fotostudio

The tiles in the “Plastic Stone Tiles – the nature of waste”-project are made from post-consumer plastic waste. The starting point of the project was the question of the nature of waste and the subjective definition of this term, especially in relation to another term – that of resources. For Enis Akiev, waste is initially unused material. Most of the waste ends up in the sea, where under natural influences plastiglomerate is formed – a combination of plastic and natural geological components, ultimately a new type of rock. Based on this, Enis Akiev investigated rock-forming processes and developed methods to give light packaging waste a natural-looking, rock-like structure. Her aim is to change the perception of waste and show its special aesthetics by focusing on post-consumer plastic waste. This increases the value of the single-use packaging waste and transforms it into an aesthetically pleasing, durable material. With her work, she would at the same time like to encourage people to reflect more about the possible uses of waste, especially in view of the decline in natural resources. The result of her project is attractive tiles of great diversity in terms of colour and pattern structure, which allow different types of rock to be associated.

 
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Sabina Dragusanu. Necklace: Untitled, 2020. Upcycled plastics.. 46 x 20 x 2.8 cm. 
. Sabina Dragusanu understands the works from the series “Neighbourhood Links” as material-based experiments in which she varies and continues her topic of plastic upcycling. Just as the lockdown was decided, she ran out of plastic bags. With the help of her local community website, she started asking the neighbours about plastic bags and was favourably surprised at the many responses. Almost at the same time, she began to be interested in the technique of crocheting and decided to process plastic bags in yarn. From this yarn, she crochets oval links and strands. For her, the motif of connecting different members refers to the idea that people help each other in difficult times, as she experienced in her community in south-west London. The necklace made of large oval links surprises with the irregular surface and distribution of colours - a result of the crocheting technique. The result is lively and subtle chromaticity.
. 
.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Sabina Dragusanu
Necklace: Untitled, 2020
Upcycled plastics.
46 x 20 x 2.8 cm

Sabina Dragusanu understands the works from the series “Neighbourhood Links” as material-based experiments in which she varies and continues her topic of plastic upcycling. Just as the lockdown was decided, she ran out of plastic bags. With the help of her local community website, she started asking the neighbours about plastic bags and was favourably surprised at the many responses. Almost at the same time, she began to be interested in the technique of crocheting and decided to process plastic bags in yarn. From this yarn, she crochets oval links and strands. For her, the motif of connecting different members refers to the idea that people help each other in difficult times, as she experienced in her community in south-west London. The necklace made of large oval links surprises with the irregular surface and distribution of colours - a result of the crocheting technique. The result is lively and subtle chromaticity.

 
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Louis Rösner. Furniture: Tendo, 2020. Plywood board. 47.5 x 54 x 47 cm. Photo by: Eva Jünger. 
. The “Tendo”-stool (lat.: tightening) is a piece of furniture that can be assembled quickly, easily, and neatly. The stool consists of only three elements and no further aids are required for assembling. The stool gains its stability from an integrated tension belt. The belt connects a centrally placed spar with the stool legs and its seat. Only when the belt is tensioned does the piece of furniture bend from a two-dimensional into a three-dimensional shape. This conversion is enabled by carefully thought-out cuts in the wood, which at the same time ensure that the seat surface flexibly adapts to the person sitting. This promotes dynamic sitting, relieves the back when sitting and prevents consequential damage caused by monotonous stress on the spine. The shape presented is the result of an extensive series of tests in which various designs were produced as models with the “Speedy100R” laser cutter from “trotec” and then compared with regard to stability, flexibility, and appearance. The lashing strap is highlighted by the choice of bright colours that are repeated on the two edges of the stool. The aim was to keep the work as straightforward as possible. That is why all wood components should be manufactured with just one machine. Multiplex or plywood was chosen as material. This is stable, has good dimensional stability, and can be easily processed with the laser. The technical drawings were created with Vectorworks and converted into processing files so that the panels could be cut with the MTL laser system from "rofin". In order to minimize waste, the components of a stool were produced from just one sheet.
. 
.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Louis Rösner
Furniture: Tendo, 2020
Plywood board
47.5 x 54 x 47 cm
Photo by: Eva Jünger

The “Tendo”-stool (lat.: tightening) is a piece of furniture that can be assembled quickly, easily, and neatly. The stool consists of only three elements and no further aids are required for assembling. The stool gains its stability from an integrated tension belt. The belt connects a centrally placed spar with the stool legs and its seat. Only when the belt is tensioned does the piece of furniture bend from a two-dimensional into a three-dimensional shape. This conversion is enabled by carefully thought-out cuts in the wood, which at the same time ensure that the seat surface flexibly adapts to the person sitting. This promotes dynamic sitting, relieves the back when sitting and prevents consequential damage caused by monotonous stress on the spine. The shape presented is the result of an extensive series of tests in which various designs were produced as models with the “Speedy100R” laser cutter from “trotec” and then compared with regard to stability, flexibility, and appearance. The lashing strap is highlighted by the choice of bright colours that are repeated on the two edges of the stool. The aim was to keep the work as straightforward as possible. That is why all wood components should be manufactured with just one machine. Multiplex or plywood was chosen as material. This is stable, has good dimensional stability, and can be easily processed with the laser. The technical drawings were created with Vectorworks and converted into processing files so that the panels could be cut with the MTL laser system from "rofin". In order to minimize waste, the components of a stool were produced from just one sheet.

 
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Rose Armstrong. Installation: A Requiem for Insects, 2018. Bamboo plywood, watercolour paint.. 180 x 240 x 10 cm. Photo by: Jack Durr, Sophie Fitch. 
. "A Requiem for Insects" reflects the decline in insect populations in Australia and the associated fears about the impending extinction of these species. Insects are important for human health and the closed nature of the ecosystem. All of the species shown in the installation are now on the list of threatened beings. Original-sized insects are created by laser cutting and engraving of wood. The forms are also painted in watercolors to look more natural. Rose Armstrong creates a series of works that documents the dissolving process of each insect in different stages. The individual components of the work are characterized by fragility and detail, which at the same time adequately and emphatically implement the delicacy of these living beings, as well as the threat to their existence. The use of wood also refers to the cutting down of the old forests and the removal of the natural habitat of the insects. The arrangement of the works is reminiscent of scientific collection concepts. In doing so, they not only indicate a museum context, but also the consideration of whether such insects can still find their way into such collections in a few years' time, or whether they are not already extinct by then.
. 
.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Rose Armstrong
Installation: A Requiem for Insects, 2018
Bamboo plywood, watercolour paint.
180 x 240 x 10 cm
Photo by: Jack Durr, Sophie Fitch

"A Requiem for Insects" reflects the decline in insect populations in Australia and the associated fears about the impending extinction of these species. Insects are important for human health and the closed nature of the ecosystem. All of the species shown in the installation are now on the list of threatened beings. Original-sized insects are created by laser cutting and engraving of wood. The forms are also painted in watercolors to look more natural. Rose Armstrong creates a series of works that documents the dissolving process of each insect in different stages. The individual components of the work are characterized by fragility and detail, which at the same time adequately and emphatically implement the delicacy of these living beings, as well as the threat to their existence. The use of wood also refers to the cutting down of the old forests and the removal of the natural habitat of the insects. The arrangement of the works is reminiscent of scientific collection concepts. In doing so, they not only indicate a museum context, but also the consideration of whether such insects can still find their way into such collections in a few years' time, or whether they are not already extinct by then.

 
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Emma Baker. Object: Carragh VI, 2020. Glass.. 16 x 23 x 5 cm. Photo by: Emma Baker. 
. Emma Baker's glass objects consist of thin, finely nuanced glass plates arranged one on top of the other. They become larger towards the middle of the object, only to diminish their size towards the top. The various shades of blue, white, and grey and the finely swaying edges of the platelets give the work a liveliness and a momentary impression. For Emma Baker, the fascination of the material and the examination of her own memories are the main stimuli for her work. These memories are captured in the medium of glass and combined with the mastery of the material result in very personal works.
. 
.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Emma Baker
Object: Carragh VI, 2020
Glass.
16 x 23 x 5 cm
Photo by: Emma Baker

Emma Baker's glass objects consist of thin, finely nuanced glass plates arranged one on top of the other. They become larger towards the middle of the object, only to diminish their size towards the top. The various shades of blue, white, and grey and the finely swaying edges of the platelets give the work a liveliness and a momentary impression. For Emma Baker, the fascination of the material and the examination of her own memories are the main stimuli for her work. These memories are captured in the medium of glass and combined with the mastery of the material result in very personal works.

 
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Paloma Vega. Necklace: Alien Avocado, 2020. Fabric, seed beads, crystals, tiger eye, aventurine, bugles, onyx, freshwater pearls, thread.. 43 x 19 x 0.5 cm. Photo by: Gino Battiston. 
. Paloma Vega sees her jewellery as journeys through landscapes with fantastic topography that condense colour, shape and volume. Different threads and beads create different structures. Each area is therefore not only determined by a certain colour and individual shape, but also by texture. Her work is based entirely on the inspiration she receives from the materials, so the result is never certain in advance. The chaos clears up in jewellery and individual forms crystallize out of a wealth of possibilities. Paloma Vega considers bead embroidery to be a perfect technique since all possibilities remain open, and different paths can be taken. The individual parts in her works are closely related. In this, she sees a parallel to human life and the relationships between people. She esteems the work also as the result of playful experiments with Latin American influences.
. 
.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Paloma Vega
Necklace: Alien Avocado, 2020
Fabric, seed beads, crystals, tiger eye, aventurine, bugles, onyx, freshwater pearls, thread.
43 x 19 x 0.5 cm
Photo by: Gino Battiston

Paloma Vega sees her jewellery as journeys through landscapes with fantastic topography that condense colour, shape and volume. Different threads and beads create different structures. Each area is therefore not only determined by a certain colour and individual shape, but also by texture. Her work is based entirely on the inspiration she receives from the materials, so the result is never certain in advance. The chaos clears up in jewellery and individual forms crystallize out of a wealth of possibilities. Paloma Vega considers bead embroidery to be a perfect technique since all possibilities remain open, and different paths can be taken. The individual parts in her works are closely related. In this, she sees a parallel to human life and the relationships between people. She esteems the work also as the result of playful experiments with Latin American influences.

 
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
May Bar Levav. Body piece: Air We Wear | Oil Spill Mexico Mask, 2019. Tencel, Aloe Vera, Pla, wool filters.. 28 x 18 x 16 cm. Photo by: Michael Shvadron. 
. May Bar Levav's work was created in response to the increasing air pollution and the corona pandemic, as well as the single-use products produced in this context. She complains that these products are not sustainable and that they are made from environmentally harmful plastic materials. For a long time, the mask was reserved for certain professional groups or was worn for religious reasons, but it has now become a general obligation. May Bar Levav hopes that even after the pandemic, the masks will continue to be worn as a preventive measure. It was her concern to use in her masks natural materials that are sustainably produced, as such materials are healthier for the body and facial skin, which are also protected by the mask. She combines three-dimensional structures for mouth and nose protection with textiles, in which filters can be inserted and renewed. The choice of filters is made according to different protection levels. The filters come from the New Zealand company "LANACO", which produces filters from natural sheep's wool. The textile frames of the masks were machine-knitted with knitting structures that were developed in such a way that no residues remained during production. The filter holders, in turn, were printed with 3D-printers. May Bar Levav is of the opinion that by wearing a mask and the associated large-scale covering of the face, new forms of communication must be found. The unusual, colourful masks represent an extremely individual position, which alone provides an incentive for communication.
. 
.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . May Bar Levav
Body piece: Air We Wear | Oil Spill Mexico Mask, 2019
Tencel, Aloe Vera, Pla, wool filters.
28 x 18 x 16 cm
Photo by: Michael Shvadron

May Bar Levav's work was created in response to the increasing air pollution and the corona pandemic, as well as the single-use products produced in this context. She complains that these products are not sustainable and that they are made from environmentally harmful plastic materials. For a long time, the mask was reserved for certain professional groups or was worn for religious reasons, but it has now become a general obligation. May Bar Levav hopes that even after the pandemic, the masks will continue to be worn as a preventive measure. It was her concern to use in her masks natural materials that are sustainably produced, as such materials are healthier for the body and facial skin, which are also protected by the mask. She combines three-dimensional structures for mouth and nose protection with textiles, in which filters can be inserted and renewed. The choice of filters is made according to different protection levels. The filters come from the New Zealand company "LANACO", which produces filters from natural sheep's wool. The textile frames of the masks were machine-knitted with knitting structures that were developed in such a way that no residues remained during production. The filter holders, in turn, were printed with 3D-printers. May Bar Levav is of the opinion that by wearing a mask and the associated large-scale covering of the face, new forms of communication must be found. The unusual, colourful masks represent an extremely individual position, which alone provides an incentive for communication.

 
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Jonas Niedermann. Object: Modular Shapes - Bleu, rose et opaline, 2020. Glass, brass.. 34 x 22 x 10 cm. Photo by: Cæciliie Philipa Vibe Pedersen. 
. Jonas Niedermann is interested in the relationship between tradition and future in the handicrafts concerning glass. In his own work, he is on the one hand obliged to the great role models of the craft side, on the other hand, he is looking for new design possibilities. The objects in his series “Modular Shapes” are extremely elegant and pure with their organic, curved forms and their delicate, subtle colours. If the spectator changes the point of view, they too change their appearance - especially with regard to the colour gradient, the depth effect and the transparency. A particular concern of Jonas Niedermann is the three-dimensional colour grading. The shape of the works and the colour gradient increase the impression of the soft and delicate. The interior of the objects also seems to be in a subtle movement. Jonas Niedermann comments on his concern: "Uniting craft, art and design, I approach a contemporary, translucent and minimalistic sculpture."
. 
.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Jonas Niedermann
Object: Modular Shapes - Bleu, rose et opaline, 2020
Glass, brass.
34 x 22 x 10 cm
Photo by: Cæciliie Philipa Vibe Pedersen

Jonas Niedermann is interested in the relationship between tradition and future in the handicrafts concerning glass. In his own work, he is on the one hand obliged to the great role models of the craft side, on the other hand, he is looking for new design possibilities. The objects in his series “Modular Shapes” are extremely elegant and pure with their organic, curved forms and their delicate, subtle colours. If the spectator changes the point of view, they too change their appearance - especially with regard to the colour gradient, the depth effect and the transparency. A particular concern of Jonas Niedermann is the three-dimensional colour grading. The shape of the works and the colour gradient increase the impression of the soft and delicate. The interior of the objects also seems to be in a subtle movement. Jonas Niedermann comments on his concern: "Uniting craft, art and design, I approach a contemporary, translucent and minimalistic sculpture."

 
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Mikuláš Brukner. Dress: Precarious situation, 2020. Viscose. 70 x 40 x 1 cm. Photo by: Marek Micánek. 
. The knitted dresses by Mikuláš Brukner from the series “Precarious Situation” are close-fitting and made of elastic rib knit. They feature exposed curved sections as a common characteristic. Dense areas of knitting alternate with areas in which the thread is loosely continued, creating transparency. The title of the series refers to the social group of the precariat with a very low or irregular income and financial insecurity. Mikuláš Brukner refers to studies by Guy Sanding Flossen, according to which the precariat is determined by negative as well as positive emotions that they experience in everyday life. For him, clothing is also a mediator and trigger of emotions. Holes were created in the knitting structure of the surface of individual items of clothing, through which the tension of precarious life is translated. The lack of rope symbolizes the lack of security. The colours for the collection range from those tones that represent calm to those that are associated with fear and aggression. The clothes thus incorporate the living conditions and emotions of this social group on several levels as inspiration for the designs and translate them into textile structures.
. 
.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Mikuláš Brukner
Dress: Precarious situation, 2020
Viscose
70 x 40 x 1 cm
Photo by: Marek Micánek

The knitted dresses by Mikuláš Brukner from the series “Precarious Situation” are close-fitting and made of elastic rib knit. They feature exposed curved sections as a common characteristic. Dense areas of knitting alternate with areas in which the thread is loosely continued, creating transparency. The title of the series refers to the social group of the precariat with a very low or irregular income and financial insecurity. Mikuláš Brukner refers to studies by Guy Sanding Flossen, according to which the precariat is determined by negative as well as positive emotions that they experience in everyday life. For him, clothing is also a mediator and trigger of emotions. Holes were created in the knitting structure of the surface of individual items of clothing, through which the tension of precarious life is translated. The lack of rope symbolizes the lack of security. The colours for the collection range from those tones that represent calm to those that are associated with fear and aggression. The clothes thus incorporate the living conditions and emotions of this social group on several levels as inspiration for the designs and translate them into textile structures.

 
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Ruth Elvira Gilmour. Textile: Frayed Bodies: Loose Gatherings - Arm, 2020. Digital print on silk.. 62 x 43 x 0.01 cm. Photo by: Ruth Elvira Gilmour. 
. Ruth Gilmour deals in her work with her own vulnerability, which she addresses through craftsmanship. These are special issues in the current situation with regard to working from home under health considerations. Ruth Gilmour’s textile works question the unified and self-contained self and show the diversity of physical nature and the various concepts of being. Own experiences and memories are implemented in both traditionally crafted and modern digital processes. The starting point for the work is worried about the state of the world and one's own health, which should find a solution in the combination of body and material. Ruth Gilmour, therefore, uses materials such as silk with its transparency, delicacy, and strength to depict skin and bones, to symbolize sensitivity and contrasts. She sees the choice of silk as problematic, as silk on the one hand forms a pleasant, comforting material, but on the other hand, it is obtained by destroying the protective cocoons of other living beings. Her work is based on digital photographs of her own body, which are digitally printed on silk and then processed with a needle, whereby the image is deconstructed and alienated, the material being dissolved to form fringes, which in turn are reminiscent of old communication systems. By dividing, fraying, folding, and knotting, the body is multiplied by innumerable threads coloured by information. Similar to the body itself, the work is constantly changing.
. 
.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Ruth Elvira Gilmour
Textile: Frayed Bodies: Loose Gatherings - Arm, 2020
Digital print on silk.
62 x 43 x 0.01 cm
Photo by: Ruth Elvira Gilmour

Ruth Gilmour deals in her work with her own vulnerability, which she addresses through craftsmanship. These are special issues in the current situation with regard to working from home under health considerations. Ruth Gilmour’s textile works question the unified and self-contained self and show the diversity of physical nature and the various concepts of being. Own experiences and memories are implemented in both traditionally crafted and modern digital processes. The starting point for the work is worried about the state of the world and one's own health, which should find a solution in the combination of body and material. Ruth Gilmour, therefore, uses materials such as silk with its transparency, delicacy, and strength to depict skin and bones, to symbolize sensitivity and contrasts. She sees the choice of silk as problematic, as silk on the one hand forms a pleasant, comforting material, but on the other hand, it is obtained by destroying the protective cocoons of other living beings. Her work is based on digital photographs of her own body, which are digitally printed on silk and then processed with a needle, whereby the image is deconstructed and alienated, the material being dissolved to form fringes, which in turn are reminiscent of old communication systems. By dividing, fraying, folding, and knotting, the body is multiplied by innumerable threads coloured by information. Similar to the body itself, the work is constantly changing.

 
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Maximilian Jüttner. Furniture: Untitled, 2020. Walnut wood. Solid frame-filling construction.. 11 x 760 x 120 cm. Photo by: Wolfgang Pulfer. 
. Maximilian Jüttner's writing desk was created with the aim of presenting the craftsmanship via classic handicraft constructions, realizing a production in solid wood and at the same time conveying a modern character. The desk can be used both while sitting and standing and looks tidy without much effort. You can work standing at the desk when it is folded up. The combination of a narrow visible edge and a two-dimensional effect formed the main idea in the planning. The prism-shaped body made of American walnut rises on a conical frame made of the same wood in tunnel construction. The body of the desk consists of a frame-filling construction. The corner connections are classically planned with a mortise and tenon connection. The writing surface is covered with leather. The unostentatious piece of furniture changes its appearance by folding away two symmetrically constructed case doors. From a restrained standing desk, a writing desk at seat height can be created in two steps. There is also enough storage space due to drawers. A milled lighting (Multi White LED strip) above the work surface allows problem-free work even in the evening hours.
. 
.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Maximilian Jüttner
Furniture: Untitled, 2020
Walnut wood
Solid frame-filling construction.
11 x 760 x 120 cm
Photo by: Wolfgang Pulfer

Maximilian Jüttner's writing desk was created with the aim of presenting the craftsmanship via classic handicraft constructions, realizing a production in solid wood and at the same time conveying a modern character. The desk can be used both while sitting and standing and looks tidy without much effort. You can work standing at the desk when it is folded up. The combination of a narrow visible edge and a two-dimensional effect formed the main idea in the planning. The prism-shaped body made of American walnut rises on a conical frame made of the same wood in tunnel construction. The body of the desk consists of a frame-filling construction. The corner connections are classically planned with a mortise and tenon connection. The writing surface is covered with leather. The unostentatious piece of furniture changes its appearance by folding away two symmetrically constructed case doors. From a restrained standing desk, a writing desk at seat height can be created in two steps. There is also enough storage space due to drawers. A milled lighting (Multi White LED strip) above the work surface allows problem-free work even in the evening hours.

 
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Paula Repp Álvarez. Bowl: Untitled, 2020. Silver 925, slate.. 5 x 25 x 8 cm. Photo by: Luzia Huber. Paula Repp-Alvarez’s silver objects have a restrained, simple shape and combine functionality and a certain sculptural monumentality. Paula Repp-Alvarez reduces the objects to basic forms and creates unusual but harmonious objects through the carefully considered use of surface structure, displacement, and combination of materials. She works with sheet silver, which she folds, bends, mills, solders, and deforms with a hammer. The striving for monumentality, for just a little too much, is intended. In the case of the bowl, her interest in ovals and the concern for multiple uses becomes obvious. This is implemented in the mixture of tray and bowl elements on the side, whereby the traditional shape of a bowl is lost. The pepper mill was designed with the desire for a sculptural shape and a deviation from the expected. In preparation of the work, paper models or paper cuts are created. In her work, Paula Repp Alvarez deals with her own impatience by conceiving objects that demand a lot of patience from her.
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.  . Paula Repp Álvarez
Bowl: Untitled, 2020
Silver 925, slate.
5 x 25 x 8 cm
Photo by: Luzia Huber
Paula Repp-Alvarez’s silver objects have a restrained, simple shape and combine functionality and a certain sculptural monumentality. Paula Repp-Alvarez reduces the objects to basic forms and creates unusual but harmonious objects through the carefully considered use of surface structure, displacement, and combination of materials. She works with sheet silver, which she folds, bends, mills, solders, and deforms with a hammer. The striving for monumentality, for just a little too much, is intended. In the case of the bowl, her interest in ovals and the concern for multiple uses becomes obvious. This is implemented in the mixture of tray and bowl elements on the side, whereby the traditional shape of a bowl is lost. The pepper mill was designed with the desire for a sculptural shape and a deviation from the expected. In preparation of the work, paper models or paper cuts are created. In her work, Paula Repp Alvarez deals with her own impatience by conceiving objects that demand a lot of patience from her.

 
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Thalea Schmalenberg. Vase: Resonance of Raw, 2020. Glass. 20 x 20 x 10 cm. 
. In her project "The Resonance of Raw", Thalea Schmalenberg deals with the combination of traditional craftsmanship and regional materials on the appearance of products. The visibility of traces on the material due to the manual production method should lead to an awareness of traditional material qualities and manufacturing processes. These should encourage a more conscious consumption of everyday objects. The project is dedicated to the combination of basket weaving and glass. Basket weaving, through which storage and transport vessels were created, offered itself for the investigations as one of the oldest crafts. Handed down early is the combination of clay or glass vessels and wickerwork, with the latter forming a protective cover around the fragile vessel. Theresa Schmalenberg took up this idea and modified it to the extent that the once protective wickerwork cover becomes a form-giving element. Her aim was to try out the shape and process design of serial objects together with the glassmaker Peter Kuchinke. The wickerwork functioned as a molding tool in the manual glass production process. Their experiments testify to the influence of the different types of basketry with regard to structural properties, durability, and aesthetic effect. The glass is blown into the plaited shape and adopts its silhouette and surface texture.
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.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Thalea Schmalenberg
Vase: Resonance of Raw, 2020
Glass
20 x 20 x 10 cm

In her project "The Resonance of Raw", Thalea Schmalenberg deals with the combination of traditional craftsmanship and regional materials on the appearance of products. The visibility of traces on the material due to the manual production method should lead to an awareness of traditional material qualities and manufacturing processes. These should encourage a more conscious consumption of everyday objects. The project is dedicated to the combination of basket weaving and glass. Basket weaving, through which storage and transport vessels were created, offered itself for the investigations as one of the oldest crafts. Handed down early is the combination of clay or glass vessels and wickerwork, with the latter forming a protective cover around the fragile vessel. Theresa Schmalenberg took up this idea and modified it to the extent that the once protective wickerwork cover becomes a form-giving element. Her aim was to try out the shape and process design of serial objects together with the glassmaker Peter Kuchinke. The wickerwork functioned as a molding tool in the manual glass production process. Their experiments testify to the influence of the different types of basketry with regard to structural properties, durability, and aesthetic effect. The glass is blown into the plaited shape and adopts its silhouette and surface texture.

 
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Aron Li. Object: Høst, 2019. Copper, acrylic paint.. 35 x 60 x 45 cm. Photo by: Aron Li. 
. Aron Irving Li’s sculptural metal objects are based on the one hand on his examination of the effects of humans on nature and the environment, on the other hand on the pursuit of creating something physical, combined with an interest in the techniques and traditions of his craft. Inspired by the complex structures of nature as they are revealed in animals and plants, he focuses on haptic and visual moments to convey the beauty and fragility of nature. Inspired by his interest in growth processes, by withering and decay in the cycle of nature, he deals with the related aesthetic aspects. He follows the changes in natural forms over time and tries to translate these processes into metal objects. For this he works with finely cut surfaces and fragile-looking net structures, combining different techniques such as hand sewing, soldering, forging, and assembly processes. Each work consists of many smaller parts that are put together to form three-dimensional structures. The net structure of the curved, seemingly organic shapes are emphasized by the colours and underlines the liveliness of the shapes. The transparency and delicacy of the metal bars result in a variety of patterns that change depending on the point of view.
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.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Aron Li
Object: Høst, 2019
Copper, acrylic paint.
35 x 60 x 45 cm
Photo by: Aron Li

Aron Irving Li’s sculptural metal objects are based on the one hand on his examination of the effects of humans on nature and the environment, on the other hand on the pursuit of creating something physical, combined with an interest in the techniques and traditions of his craft. Inspired by the complex structures of nature as they are revealed in animals and plants, he focuses on haptic and visual moments to convey the beauty and fragility of nature. Inspired by his interest in growth processes, by withering and decay in the cycle of nature, he deals with the related aesthetic aspects. He follows the changes in natural forms over time and tries to translate these processes into metal objects. For this he works with finely cut surfaces and fragile-looking net structures, combining different techniques such as hand sewing, soldering, forging, and assembly processes. Each work consists of many smaller parts that are put together to form three-dimensional structures. The net structure of the curved, seemingly organic shapes are emphasized by the colours and underlines the liveliness of the shapes. The transparency and delicacy of the metal bars result in a variety of patterns that change depending on the point of view.

 
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Keng-Hung Lin. Object: Fold ferning, 2019. Copper, patina.. Left: 16.5 x 53 x 25 cm; Right: 10.5 x 55 x 30 cm. Photo by: Wen-Hsing Hsu. 
. Keng-Hung Lin is fascinated by the growth of nature. For his work, he was inspired by the beauty and biodiversity of the ferns in Taiwan, especially their changeability and power. He recreates these properties in his metal objects. For him, metal is a living material that he processes in different techniques and he follows thoughtfully the development of forms. He strives to recreate the properties of the ferns in the metal. Keng-Hung Lin stretches and folds the metal to create smooth, three-dimensional, semi-open shapes whose elegant curves match those of the plants. He creates the shape of sporangia through repoussé and chasing. Finally, the work is patinated. The poetic objects of Keng-Hung Lin reveal their role model, but a careful stylization and the renunciation of naturalistic colours underline his curiosity and research interest in ferns. The condition between imitation and translation directly from nature is surprisingly balanced.
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.  . Keng-Hung Lin
Object: Fold ferning, 2019
Copper, patina.
Left: 16.5 x 53 x 25 cm; Right: 10.5 x 55 x 30 cm
Photo by: Wen-Hsing Hsu

Keng-Hung Lin is fascinated by the growth of nature. For his work, he was inspired by the beauty and biodiversity of the ferns in Taiwan, especially their changeability and power. He recreates these properties in his metal objects. For him, metal is a living material that he processes in different techniques and he follows thoughtfully the development of forms. He strives to recreate the properties of the ferns in the metal. Keng-Hung Lin stretches and folds the metal to create smooth, three-dimensional, semi-open shapes whose elegant curves match those of the plants. He creates the shape of sporangia through repoussé and chasing. Finally, the work is patinated. The poetic objects of Keng-Hung Lin reveal their role model, but a careful stylization and the renunciation of naturalistic colours underline his curiosity and research interest in ferns. The condition between imitation and translation directly from nature is surprisingly balanced.

 
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Xin Liu. Object: 3D-Hand, 2019. Silver.. 25.5 x 16.8 x 14.8 cm. Photo by: Xin Liu. 
. Xin Liu's work is based on considerations about the importance of digital manufacturing in the present. The digital production of objects is widespread in all fields and has changed the way people work and think, as well as the understanding of traditional craft techniques. The new technologies show previously unknown possibilities, which in turn provide suggestions for the production of three-dimensional shapes. Xin Liu's work is the result of a new manual design method that combines the principle of the additive manufacturing process of a 3D-printer with traditional craftsmanship and in this context honours the craft. Based on the additive process of 3D-printing, Xin Liu devised complicated three-dimensional structures which were handcrafted in order to develop a new design language between manual and digital production. The fascinating thing about manual production lies in the direct contact between material and hand. For Xin Liu, the important thing is always the process in which knowledge and emotions - in contrast to computer production - are transferred to the object itself. The objects are created by continuously applying new layers of solder to a plaster body. The design of the shape is constantly evolving during production - in contrast to 3D-printer production, where spontaneous changes and further developments of a given design are not possible. By carefully combining small individual elements, the shapes grow organically in layers that create overlapping volumes and smaller shapes within larger complexes. After removing the plaster, the transparency of the forms and the fascinating pointillist detail become manifest.
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.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Xin Liu
Object: 3D-Hand, 2019
Silver.
25.5 x 16.8 x 14.8 cm
Photo by: Xin Liu

Xin Liu's work is based on considerations about the importance of digital manufacturing in the present. The digital production of objects is widespread in all fields and has changed the way people work and think, as well as the understanding of traditional craft techniques. The new technologies show previously unknown possibilities, which in turn provide suggestions for the production of three-dimensional shapes. Xin Liu's work is the result of a new manual design method that combines the principle of the additive manufacturing process of a 3D-printer with traditional craftsmanship and in this context honours the craft. Based on the additive process of 3D-printing, Xin Liu devised complicated three-dimensional structures which were handcrafted in order to develop a new design language between manual and digital production. The fascinating thing about manual production lies in the direct contact between material and hand. For Xin Liu, the important thing is always the process in which knowledge and emotions - in contrast to computer production - are transferred to the object itself. The objects are created by continuously applying new layers of solder to a plaster body. The design of the shape is constantly evolving during production - in contrast to 3D-printer production, where spontaneous changes and further developments of a given design are not possible. By carefully combining small individual elements, the shapes grow organically in layers that create overlapping volumes and smaller shapes within larger complexes. After removing the plaster, the transparency of the forms and the fascinating pointillist detail become manifest.

 
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Paula Repp Alvarez. Object: Untitled, 2019. Silver 925, steel.. 29 x 10 x 10 cm. Photo by: Luzia Huber. 
. Paula Repp-Alvarez’s silver objects have a restrained, simple shape and combine functionality and a certain sculptural monumentality. Paula Repp-Alvarez reduces the objects to basic forms and creates unusual but harmonious objects through the carefully considered use of surface structure, displacement, and combination of materials. She works with sheet silver, which she folds, bends, mills, solders, and deforms with a hammer. The striving for monumentality, for just a little too much, is intended. In the case of the bowl, her interest in ovals and the concern for multiple uses becomes obvious. This is implemented in the mixture of tray and bowl elements on the side, whereby the traditional shape of a bowl is lost. The pepper mill was designed with the desire for a sculptural shape and a deviation from the expected. In preparation of the work, paper models or paper cuts are created. In her work, Paula Repp Alvarez deals with her own impatience by conceiving objects that demand a lot of patience from her.
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.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Paula Repp Alvarez
Object: Untitled, 2019
Silver 925, steel.
29 x 10 x 10 cm
Photo by: Luzia Huber

Paula Repp-Alvarez’s silver objects have a restrained, simple shape and combine functionality and a certain sculptural monumentality. Paula Repp-Alvarez reduces the objects to basic forms and creates unusual but harmonious objects through the carefully considered use of surface structure, displacement, and combination of materials. She works with sheet silver, which she folds, bends, mills, solders, and deforms with a hammer. The striving for monumentality, for just a little too much, is intended. In the case of the bowl, her interest in ovals and the concern for multiple uses becomes obvious. This is implemented in the mixture of tray and bowl elements on the side, whereby the traditional shape of a bowl is lost. The pepper mill was designed with the desire for a sculptural shape and a deviation from the expected. In preparation of the work, paper models or paper cuts are created. In her work, Paula Repp Alvarez deals with her own impatience by conceiving objects that demand a lot of patience from her.

 
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Kazuhiro Toyama. Object: Blaze, 2019. Stainless steel, mild steel, aluminum, copper, brass.. 51 x 75 x 54 cm. Photo by: Shinichi Ichikawa. From series: Biophilia. 
. Despite the enthusiasm for technology, contemporary society regards a green city as an ideal, based on an instinctive pursuit for nature in man. In his series "Biophilia", Kazuhiro Toyama tries to combine and implement these opposites of nature and city. He chooses metal as his material, which defines contemporary architecture, but uses it to express the beauty and strength of nature. At the same time, he wants to remind of the danger of environmental degradation towards which humans are heading and advocates living in harmony with nature. In his work, Kazuhiro Toyama sets the different melting points and melting methods of metal alloys and uses them for thermal spray techniques - intrinsically an industrial technology for coatings. He varies these experimentally for his own purposes by working with an acetylene torch and a plasma cutting machine on stainless steel wire. In his work, Kazuhiro Toyama not only deals with the topic of transformation and life but also with the importance of handicraft in the present. For him, craft means material research, dealing with traditional and modern techniques and their relevance for one's own work. Kazuhiro Toyama argues that especially in the current situation in which computer work has increased, handicraft objects convey warmth, inspiration, and authenticity.
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.  . Kazuhiro Toyama
Object: Blaze, 2019
Stainless steel, mild steel, aluminum, copper, brass.
51 x 75 x 54 cm
Photo by: Shinichi Ichikawa
From series: Biophilia

Despite the enthusiasm for technology, contemporary society regards a green city as an ideal, based on an instinctive pursuit for nature in man. In his series "Biophilia", Kazuhiro Toyama tries to combine and implement these opposites of nature and city. He chooses metal as his material, which defines contemporary architecture, but uses it to express the beauty and strength of nature. At the same time, he wants to remind of the danger of environmental degradation towards which humans are heading and advocates living in harmony with nature. In his work, Kazuhiro Toyama sets the different melting points and melting methods of metal alloys and uses them for thermal spray techniques - intrinsically an industrial technology for coatings. He varies these experimentally for his own purposes by working with an acetylene torch and a plasma cutting machine on stainless steel wire. In his work, Kazuhiro Toyama not only deals with the topic of transformation and life but also with the importance of handicraft in the present. For him, craft means material research, dealing with traditional and modern techniques and their relevance for one's own work. Kazuhiro Toyama argues that especially in the current situation in which computer work has increased, handicraft objects convey warmth, inspiration, and authenticity.

 
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I-An Wang. Object: Tiny Curves Hang Above Me? III, 2017. Copper, enamel.. 34 x 14 x 24 cm. Photo by: I-An Wang. 
. Wang I-An chases her forms out of the metal, combining gentle curves and bulges with sharp ridges or ornamental relief areas. She works with direct fire to burn the enamel several times on the surface. The changes in the surface, co-determined by chance, result in interesting and surprising structures that invite various associations and make one think of body parts, skin, organs. Wan I-An emphasizes this effect by post-processing the enamel by applying different layers or by sanding. The metal objects have a very lively character due to their strongly curved shape, the different structures, and the irregular surface colour and quality, and are reminiscent of microorganisms. The high ridges in particular convey liveliness and dynamism.
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.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . I-An Wang
Object: Tiny Curves Hang Above Me? III, 2017
Copper, enamel.
34 x 14 x 24 cm
Photo by: I-An Wang

Wang I-An chases her forms out of the metal, combining gentle curves and bulges with sharp ridges or ornamental relief areas. She works with direct fire to burn the enamel several times on the surface. The changes in the surface, co-determined by chance, result in interesting and surprising structures that invite various associations and make one think of body parts, skin, organs. Wan I-An emphasizes this effect by post-processing the enamel by applying different layers or by sanding. The metal objects have a very lively character due to their strongly curved shape, the different structures, and the irregular surface colour and quality, and are reminiscent of microorganisms. The high ridges in particular convey liveliness and dynamism.

 
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Hikari Yamaguchi. Vase: Untitled, 2018. Copper foil, enamel.. 15.5 x 26 x 4 cm. Photo by: Shinichi Ichikawa. From series: Family. 
. Hikari Yamaguchi's unusual vase objects consist of curved bodies that are accompanied by body-high, wing-like side parts. The surface decoration continuously covers the body and side parts, reducing the three-dimensional effect of the vase. The objects thus alternate between three-dimensionality and flatness in a most interesting way. Hikari Yamaguchi's focus is on the random colour reaction between metals, between copper plates and enamel. She uses 0.3 mm thin copper plates as canvas and paints them in enamel with compositions of lines and dots, following her intuition. The vases are fired several times. With her colourful works, Hikari Yamaguchi wants to emphasize the importance of the senses and intuition, which are increasingly being neglected compared to the assessment of technology. She would like to remind of the immediacy of sensory impressions, of the meaning of feelings and experiences.
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.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Hikari Yamaguchi
Vase: Untitled, 2018
Copper foil, enamel.
15.5 x 26 x 4 cm
Photo by: Shinichi Ichikawa
From series: Family

Hikari Yamaguchi's unusual vase objects consist of curved bodies that are accompanied by body-high, wing-like side parts. The surface decoration continuously covers the body and side parts, reducing the three-dimensional effect of the vase. The objects thus alternate between three-dimensionality and flatness in a most interesting way. Hikari Yamaguchi's focus is on the random colour reaction between metals, between copper plates and enamel. She uses 0.3 mm thin copper plates as canvas and paints them in enamel with compositions of lines and dots, following her intuition. The vases are fired several times. With her colourful works, Hikari Yamaguchi wants to emphasize the importance of the senses and intuition, which are increasingly being neglected compared to the assessment of technology. She would like to remind of the immediacy of sensory impressions, of the meaning of feelings and experiences.

 
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Merlin Bally. Furniture: Master piece, 2020. Ash, linoleum.. 76 x 190 x 89 cm. Photo by: Wolfgang Pulver. 
. Merlin Bally's writing desk is to offer enough space and storage space to work and at the same time not to look too large and voluminous, but rather light and simple. The aim is openness and transparency concerning the room. With its recessed fronts and sharp edges, an interesting play of shadows is created, which gives the desk its very own character. The pleasant feel of the solid ash is complemented by the elegant and silk-matt surface of the linoleum. The colour "aquavert" sets an accent and conveys a certain tension. The spread feet give the desk a firm footing. The functions are geared towards the essential uses of a modern writing desk: reading, writing, sketching and working with the laptop/computer. Drawers provide storage space for paper and office utensils. The dovetail jointed drawers are traditionally guided by a groove guide. Recessed magnetic locks are used to lock the middle drawers. The rear flap provides additional storage space and contains a compartment with three sockets. All chargers with cables can be accommodated here.
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.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Merlin Bally
Furniture: Master piece, 2020
Ash, linoleum.
76 x 190 x 89 cm
Photo by: Wolfgang Pulver

Merlin Bally's writing desk is to offer enough space and storage space to work and at the same time not to look too large and voluminous, but rather light and simple. The aim is openness and transparency concerning the room. With its recessed fronts and sharp edges, an interesting play of shadows is created, which gives the desk its very own character. The pleasant feel of the solid ash is complemented by the elegant and silk-matt surface of the linoleum. The colour "aquavert" sets an accent and conveys a certain tension. The spread feet give the desk a firm footing. The functions are geared towards the essential uses of a modern writing desk: reading, writing, sketching and working with the laptop/computer. Drawers provide storage space for paper and office utensils. The dovetail jointed drawers are traditionally guided by a groove guide. Recessed magnetic locks are used to lock the middle drawers. The rear flap provides additional storage space and contains a compartment with three sockets. All chargers with cables can be accommodated here.

 
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Emanuele Ferraro. Furniture: Isole, 2019. Wood.. 30 x 50 x 100 cm. Photo by: Fabian Frinzel. 
. In the case of the “Isole” coffee table, the usually flat tabletop is divided into a visually interesting combination of surfaces of different sizes and heights, which form a composition of many small tables that are connected by a common base plate. Emanuelle Ferraro would like the table to adapt over the years to changing needs and thus refers to the approach of sustainability in his design. For him, sustainability means durability, flexibility, and beauty. A well-thought-out, versatile, practical, and appealing design prevents objects from being thrown away quickly and also underlines the individual approach to interior decoration. The table is made without the use of adhesives, instead, its individual parts are connected by a system of removable screws that make it easier to dismantle when moving and allow problem-free shipping. Adding different tabletop sizes and changing the height of the supports according to individual wishes and requirements is quick and easy to accomplish.
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.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Emanuele Ferraro
Furniture: Isole, 2019
Wood.
30 x 50 x 100 cm
Photo by: Fabian Frinzel

In the case of the “Isole” coffee table, the usually flat tabletop is divided into a visually interesting combination of surfaces of different sizes and heights, which form a composition of many small tables that are connected by a common base plate. Emanuelle Ferraro would like the table to adapt over the years to changing needs and thus refers to the approach of sustainability in his design. For him, sustainability means durability, flexibility, and beauty. A well-thought-out, versatile, practical, and appealing design prevents objects from being thrown away quickly and also underlines the individual approach to interior decoration. The table is made without the use of adhesives, instead, its individual parts are connected by a system of removable screws that make it easier to dismantle when moving and allow problem-free shipping. Adding different tabletop sizes and changing the height of the supports according to individual wishes and requirements is quick and easy to accomplish.

 
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Luisa Maria Heindl. Furniture: Bettgeschichten (Bed Stories), 2020. Birch plywood, climbing ropes.. 30 x 103 x 203 cm. Photo by: Luisa Maria Heindl. 
. The bed made of birch plywood and climbing ropes sees itself as a bed for young people who, as part of their training, lead a nomadic life with many moves. The bed is easy to assemble and dismantle by plugging and tensioning. It is reduced to the essential elements. The costs are relatively low, the material is quite light, and the colour of the rope allows individual accents to be set. Luisa Maria Heindl esteems her bed design as the first piece of furniture in a series that aims to address the aspects of cost and mobility, simplicity, and functionality, preferably to young customers.
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.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Luisa Maria Heindl
Furniture: Bettgeschichten (Bed Stories), 2020
Birch plywood, climbing ropes.
30 x 103 x 203 cm
Photo by: Luisa Maria Heindl

The bed made of birch plywood and climbing ropes sees itself as a bed for young people who, as part of their training, lead a nomadic life with many moves. The bed is easy to assemble and dismantle by plugging and tensioning. It is reduced to the essential elements. The costs are relatively low, the material is quite light, and the colour of the rope allows individual accents to be set. Luisa Maria Heindl esteems her bed design as the first piece of furniture in a series that aims to address the aspects of cost and mobility, simplicity, and functionality, preferably to young customers.

 
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Elena Vogel. Furniture: Kuno, 2020. Steel, rope, leather.. 55 x 35 x 37 cm. Photo by: Elena Vogel. 
. The stool “kuno” meets all the requirements of such a piece of furniture - mobility and flexibility. The stool combines a simple shape and materials with opposing properties and meets the requirement for a good sitting posture. For its frame, two symmetrical halves made of 12 mm round steel were bent into shape. The rounded shape supports an upright posture when sitting. The eye-catching lacing on the underside of the seat allows a view of the connecting rods that hold both halves together. Thanks to its slim design in combination with rounded corners and arches, the stool embodies lightness and dynamism. The seat is covered with high-quality leather that is stretched onto the steel by a single rope and is fastened like a corset. The mixture of open and encased areas, different colours and different surfaces is held together harmoniously by the closed contour of the stool.
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.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Elena Vogel
Furniture: Kuno, 2020
Steel, rope, leather.
55 x 35 x 37 cm
Photo by: Elena Vogel

The stool “kuno” meets all the requirements of such a piece of furniture - mobility and flexibility. The stool combines a simple shape and materials with opposing properties and meets the requirement for a good sitting posture. For its frame, two symmetrical halves made of 12 mm round steel were bent into shape. The rounded shape supports an upright posture when sitting. The eye-catching lacing on the underside of the seat allows a view of the connecting rods that hold both halves together. Thanks to its slim design in combination with rounded corners and arches, the stool embodies lightness and dynamism. The seat is covered with high-quality leather that is stretched onto the steel by a single rope and is fastened like a corset. The mixture of open and encased areas, different colours and different surfaces is held together harmoniously by the closed contour of the stool.

 
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David Bühler. Furniture: Untitled, 2020. Larch wood, black linoleum.. 101 x 120 x 42 cm. Photo by: David Bühler. 
. When designing his sideboard, David Bühler was particularly interested in an unusual original look. That is why he chose a circumferential "strip facade" so that the piece of furniture does not have the main view but can be viewed from all sides. The strip optics result in a special effect that changes according to point of view and light. The furniture is designed as a closed but at the same time permeable body. The open joints between the individual strips break through the surrounding front and enable a special play of light and shadow. The basic construction is tunnel construction, here the legs run right through and are connected with individual bridges. Strips glued into the bars close the body. This can be opened through a flap on the front. As this should not be visible at first glance, the individual strips of the flap are virtually connected on the inside with recessed head strips. The legs are slotted and take over the rhythm of the bars so that the row is not interrupted at the corners. The legs taper towards the bottom; so the joints slowly run into the floor and the lightness of the piece is retained.
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.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . David Bühler
Furniture: Untitled, 2020
Larch wood, black linoleum.
101 x 120 x 42 cm
Photo by: David Bühler

When designing his sideboard, David Bühler was particularly interested in an unusual original look. That is why he chose a circumferential "strip facade" so that the piece of furniture does not have the main view but can be viewed from all sides. The strip optics result in a special effect that changes according to point of view and light. The furniture is designed as a closed but at the same time permeable body. The open joints between the individual strips break through the surrounding front and enable a special play of light and shadow. The basic construction is tunnel construction, here the legs run right through and are connected with individual bridges. Strips glued into the bars close the body. This can be opened through a flap on the front. As this should not be visible at first glance, the individual strips of the flap are virtually connected on the inside with recessed head strips. The legs are slotted and take over the rhythm of the bars so that the row is not interrupted at the corners. The legs taper towards the bottom; so the joints slowly run into the floor and the lightness of the piece is retained.

 
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Johannes Müller. Furniture: Biblioteca JM04 (Master piece), 2020. Sen, chrome pipe, leather.. 85 x 200 x 45 cm. Photo by: Wolfgang Pulver. 
. In his piece of furniture “Bibliotheca”, Johannes Müller combines his passion for books with that for the formal idiom of Japanese and Scandinavian furniture and the Bauhaus. "Biblioteca" is a backward-sloping sideboard for books. The body is lifted up by a chrome-plated frame and inclines towards the viewer due to its special position. The simple sen-cover is combined with leather of similar colour and results in a harmonious unit. When the shutters are opened, the differently coloured book spines are visible. Johannes Müller is always looking for new forms of furniture design and tries to explore the limits of the material wood and to strive for the greatest possible reduction. The goal is the design of elegant, high-quality, unpretentious furniture. In Johannes Müller’s opinion, furniture should contribute to conveying warmth and harmony in the home. The objects should be sustainable and, due to their design, be passed on from generation to generation.
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.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Johannes Müller
Furniture: Biblioteca JM04 (Master piece), 2020
Sen, chrome pipe, leather.
85 x 200 x 45 cm
Photo by: Wolfgang Pulver

In his piece of furniture “Bibliotheca”, Johannes Müller combines his passion for books with that for the formal idiom of Japanese and Scandinavian furniture and the Bauhaus. "Biblioteca" is a backward-sloping sideboard for books. The body is lifted up by a chrome-plated frame and inclines towards the viewer due to its special position. The simple sen-cover is combined with leather of similar colour and results in a harmonious unit. When the shutters are opened, the differently coloured book spines are visible. Johannes Müller is always looking for new forms of furniture design and tries to explore the limits of the material wood and to strive for the greatest possible reduction. The goal is the design of elegant, high-quality, unpretentious furniture. In Johannes Müller’s opinion, furniture should contribute to conveying warmth and harmony in the home. The objects should be sustainable and, due to their design, be passed on from generation to generation.

 
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Diana Bilichenko. Piece: Shadows of Chernobyl, 2020. Roots, earth, textile, paper.. 144 x 260 x 1 cm. Photo by: Diana Bilichenko. 
. Diana Bilichenko reflects in her work on the Chernobyl disaster and deals with the fate of the former inhabitants of this city, with their feelings and emotions. She wants to conjure up the atmosphere of an abandoned city and to make the hopelessness, despair, and pain of that time tangible. She is inspired by the city of Pripyat, a city in northern Ukraine that was founded in connection with the building of the nearby Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. The people fled the city and left behind their possessions, most of which have remained intact to this day. Diana Bilichenko implemented this idea of preserved things by connecting them to the ground, the earth, in which historical objects can be kept for centuries. She works on her "carpet" with the method of growing grass. The roots of the grass hold the soil and textile together and create an unusual structure. With her work, Diana Bilichenko would like to invite the viewer to reflect on his or her own life and to consider if there is really a need for atomic energy.
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.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Diana Bilichenko
Piece: Shadows of Chernobyl, 2020
Roots, earth, textile, paper.
144 x 260 x 1 cm
Photo by: Diana Bilichenko

Diana Bilichenko reflects in her work on the Chernobyl disaster and deals with the fate of the former inhabitants of this city, with their feelings and emotions. She wants to conjure up the atmosphere of an abandoned city and to make the hopelessness, despair, and pain of that time tangible. She is inspired by the city of Pripyat, a city in northern Ukraine that was founded in connection with the building of the nearby Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. The people fled the city and left behind their possessions, most of which have remained intact to this day. Diana Bilichenko implemented this idea of preserved things by connecting them to the ground, the earth, in which historical objects can be kept for centuries. She works on her "carpet" with the method of growing grass. The roots of the grass hold the soil and textile together and create an unusual structure. With her work, Diana Bilichenko would like to invite the viewer to reflect on his or her own life and to consider if there is really a need for atomic energy.

 
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Giorgi Danibegashvili. Object: Untitled, 2019. Silk, handmade paper.. 9.5 x 6 x 9.5 cm. Photo by: Giorgi Danibegashvili. From series: Gardens of the Universe. 
. The works from the series “Gardens of the Universe” are cylindrical, box-like in shape, and are determined by the beauty and different surface properties of the two materials used, silk and paper, which complement each other in character. The colours are subtly coordinated. Giorgi Danibegashvili describes the flow of circular movements with his objects. His concern is the translation of the living flow of forms. This movement refers to the basic theme of the series - that of transformation.
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.  . Giorgi Danibegashvili
Object: Untitled, 2019
Silk, handmade paper.
9.5 x 6 x 9.5 cm
Photo by: Giorgi Danibegashvili
From series: Gardens of the Universe

The works from the series “Gardens of the Universe” are cylindrical, box-like in shape, and are determined by the beauty and different surface properties of the two materials used, silk and paper, which complement each other in character. The colours are subtly coordinated. Giorgi Danibegashvili describes the flow of circular movements with his objects. His concern is the translation of the living flow of forms. This movement refers to the basic theme of the series - that of transformation.

 
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Nata Togliatti. Installation: Cave Painting Series (finest nut variation), 2020. Packaging.. 251 x 175 x 4 cm. Photo by: Nata Togliatti. From series: Cave Painting. 
. The series of the cycle “Cave Painting” comprise installations in oil and tempera painting, which take up decorative elements from the apartment where Nata Togliatti spend her childhood in Russia. With the title, she refers to prehistoric cave paintings in which thoughts and experiences were converted and represented. She sees herself as the "hunter of our time". The work is based on an autobiographical approach: patterns and ornaments trigger unconscious memories of childhood, convey a feeling of home and protection. The paintings reflect motif excerpts from wallpaper patterns. They serve Nata Togliatti as hold in an uncertain future and as a basis for dealing with questions about the origins and beginning, with memories, but also with responsibility for the future. Used, discarded packaging from the supermarket serves as a medium for the paintings. The colours are produced by herself using traditional methods. Nata Togliatti would like to pursue her art as independently of financial investments as possible.At a closer look traces of use and damage are visible. The colourful works with their traditional patterns are irritating due to the combination with a free, dynamic ductus and the additive composition of surfaces. Only on closer inspection, the irregular shape of the works becomes recognizable as unfolded packaging.
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.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Nata Togliatti
Installation: Cave Painting Series (finest nut variation), 2020
Packaging.
251 x 175 x 4 cm
Photo by: Nata Togliatti
From series: Cave Painting

The series of the cycle “Cave Painting” comprise installations in oil and tempera painting, which take up decorative elements from the apartment where Nata Togliatti spend her childhood in Russia. With the title, she refers to prehistoric cave paintings in which thoughts and experiences were converted and represented. She sees herself as the "hunter of our time". The work is based on an autobiographical approach: patterns and ornaments trigger unconscious memories of childhood, convey a feeling of home and protection. The paintings reflect motif excerpts from wallpaper patterns. They serve Nata Togliatti as hold in an uncertain future and as a basis for dealing with questions about the origins and beginning, with memories, but also with responsibility for the future. Used, discarded packaging from the supermarket serves as a medium for the paintings. The colours are produced by herself using traditional methods. Nata Togliatti would like to pursue her art as independently of financial investments as possible.At a closer look traces of use and damage are visible. The colourful works with their traditional patterns are irritating due to the combination with a free, dynamic ductus and the additive composition of surfaces. Only on closer inspection, the irregular shape of the works becomes recognizable as unfolded packaging.

 
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Felicia Li. Pendant: Felicia Li's 'The Warmth of Childhood', 2019. Silver, enamel, natural silk.. 6.5 x 4 x 1.4 cm. Photo by: Yutong. 
. Felicia Li's works are based on her own experiences and refer to her childhood in a large family in China as well as to the cultural traditions that define how people interact with one another. She remembers a lack of warmth and affection. Her memories include those of illnesses in which her mother reproached her, but eventually prepared a hot water bottle. She imitates this symbol of warmth on a small scale. The small pillow, on the other hand, refers to the gender segregation in larger families in China when the women sleep in one bed and the men in another bed, couples are therefore separated. The relationship of a married couple is abandoned in favour of the child. Against the specific cultural background, the small everyday objects with their attractively shimmering surfaces acquire an extremely sad and desolate quality, but at the same time function as a sign of the warmth and care that is nevertheless possible under these circumstances.
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.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Felicia Li
Pendant: Felicia Li's 'The Warmth of Childhood', 2019
Silver, enamel, natural silk.
6.5 x 4 x 1.4 cm
Photo by: Yutong

Felicia Li's works are based on her own experiences and refer to her childhood in a large family in China as well as to the cultural traditions that define how people interact with one another. She remembers a lack of warmth and affection. Her memories include those of illnesses in which her mother reproached her, but eventually prepared a hot water bottle. She imitates this symbol of warmth on a small scale. The small pillow, on the other hand, refers to the gender segregation in larger families in China when the women sleep in one bed and the men in another bed, couples are therefore separated. The relationship of a married couple is abandoned in favour of the child. Against the specific cultural background, the small everyday objects with their attractively shimmering surfaces acquire an extremely sad and desolate quality, but at the same time function as a sign of the warmth and care that is nevertheless possible under these circumstances.

 
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Aphra Cheesman. Neckpiece: Untitled, 2020. Mild steel, furniture paint, furniture wax, silk thread, copper.. 9 x 6.6 x 2 cm. Photo by: Andrew Barcham. 
. On daily walks, Aphra Cheesman turned her attention to traces of encounters between people and things. She collected worn or crumbled objects and materials that still bear evidence of their earlier function. She converted these found pieces into jewellery and objects in her series “Stuff” by reacting to these objects. In doing so, she combines, transforms and alienates elements of these familiar things. This results in a hybrid familiarity that withdraws the objects from a clear classification and turns them into “stuff”. The work “Tin Can and Fence” for example goes back to a walk where Aphra Cheesman found a rusty tin can next to a warped wire fence. She recreated the discarded tin can in mild steel, then added a wire fence pattern based on the shadow of the fence at the place where the can was found. Along the drawn lines, she cut the object into more than 100 small sections, which were then welded back together. This deconstruction and reconstruction distorted the shape of the piece and conveyed its original shape all the more forcefully. In her work, Aphra Cheesman uses traditional metalworking techniques such as soldering, enamelling, and repoussé, as well as newer technologies such as micro-welding and other processes such as painting, moulding, and sewing. As an inspiration for her work, she names Maurizia Boscagli’s "Stuff Theory". This asks to pay more attention to the objects and to reconsider the common categorizations. Aphra Cheesman's objects alternate between the familiar and the new and thus draw attention to themselves - to their shape, the unusual surfaces, materials and colours.
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.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Aphra Cheesman
Neckpiece: Untitled, 2020
Mild steel, furniture paint, furniture wax, silk thread, copper.
9 x 6.6 x 2 cm
Photo by: Andrew Barcham

On daily walks, Aphra Cheesman turned her attention to traces of encounters between people and things. She collected worn or crumbled objects and materials that still bear evidence of their earlier function. She converted these found pieces into jewellery and objects in her series “Stuff” by reacting to these objects. In doing so, she combines, transforms and alienates elements of these familiar things. This results in a hybrid familiarity that withdraws the objects from a clear classification and turns them into “stuff”. The work “Tin Can and Fence” for example goes back to a walk where Aphra Cheesman found a rusty tin can next to a warped wire fence. She recreated the discarded tin can in mild steel, then added a wire fence pattern based on the shadow of the fence at the place where the can was found. Along the drawn lines, she cut the object into more than 100 small sections, which were then welded back together. This deconstruction and reconstruction distorted the shape of the piece and conveyed its original shape all the more forcefully. In her work, Aphra Cheesman uses traditional metalworking techniques such as soldering, enamelling, and repoussé, as well as newer technologies such as micro-welding and other processes such as painting, moulding, and sewing. As an inspiration for her work, she names Maurizia Boscagli’s "Stuff Theory". This asks to pay more attention to the objects and to reconsider the common categorizations. Aphra Cheesman's objects alternate between the familiar and the new and thus draw attention to themselves - to their shape, the unusual surfaces, materials and colours.

 
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Minyeol Cho. Brooch: To Home Nº.1, 2018. Denim, hemp, sterling silver.. 8 x 11.5 x 5.5 cm. Photo by: Sangdeok Han. 
. Minyeol Cho's brooches are based on the character of the materials and his own associated ideas. For him, materials form the basis for new experiments and design ideas. The brooches in the series “to home” are made from textiles, denim, hemp, and cotton. He transforms the flat, planar fabric into a three-dimensional shape by stacking and wrapping it around, experimenting with the possibilities of the materials, exploring elements of texture and shape. This also includes bleaching and colouring the material. Minyeol Cho understands the work in repetitive steps as part of his material experiment. The result of this experiment is sculptural works of surprising form. The structure in fine layers gives them an unusual surface quality, which is emphasized by the contrasting colours of the outer and inner surfaces.
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.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Minyeol Cho
Brooch: To Home Nº.1, 2018
Denim, hemp, sterling silver.
8 x 11.5 x 5.5 cm
Photo by: Sangdeok Han

Minyeol Cho's brooches are based on the character of the materials and his own associated ideas. For him, materials form the basis for new experiments and design ideas. The brooches in the series “to home” are made from textiles, denim, hemp, and cotton. He transforms the flat, planar fabric into a three-dimensional shape by stacking and wrapping it around, experimenting with the possibilities of the materials, exploring elements of texture and shape. This also includes bleaching and colouring the material. Minyeol Cho understands the work in repetitive steps as part of his material experiment. The result of this experiment is sculptural works of surprising form. The structure in fine layers gives them an unusual surface quality, which is emphasized by the contrasting colours of the outer and inner surfaces.

 
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Vendula Fabianova. Neckpiece: The Apple, 2020. Applewood, leather, horsehair, silk thread.. 45 x 16 x 4.5 cm. Photo by: Vendula Fabiánová. 
. In her work, Vendula Fabiánová deals with the interplay of body and object in jewellery. It is her concern that the jewellery touches the wearer's body and is experienced there, that haptic experiences are conveyed. The material characteristics of the piece such as weight, size and texture are relevant for this. The forms of her work do not follow those of the body, but rather relate to it. This creates a special language that, among other things, refers to female sexuality and is dedicated to the exploration of the inner and outer spaces of the body and mind. Vendula Fabiánová uses natural materials from which some have an animal origin. By this she refers to traces of the physical existence living beings are leaving behind. It is important to her to try to make the immaterial tangible, to condense the unknown and abstract in a form. The works made of wood or stone are shaped by cuts, cavities and facet-like play with edges and plain surfaces. For Vendula Fabiánová, every work embodies a concept, a thought, an idea. She understands the interplay between the wearer's body and the jewellery object as that of two bodies. Based on this, wearing jewellery may become a performance or a personal ritual. In her view, the worn piece of jewellery develops into a continuation of the body and the mind on a physical, aesthetic and conceptual level.
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.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Vendula Fabianova
Neckpiece: The Apple, 2020
Applewood, leather, horsehair, silk thread.
45 x 16 x 4.5 cm
Photo by: Vendula Fabiánová

In her work, Vendula Fabiánová deals with the interplay of body and object in jewellery. It is her concern that the jewellery touches the wearer's body and is experienced there, that haptic experiences are conveyed. The material characteristics of the piece such as weight, size and texture are relevant for this. The forms of her work do not follow those of the body, but rather relate to it. This creates a special language that, among other things, refers to female sexuality and is dedicated to the exploration of the inner and outer spaces of the body and mind. Vendula Fabiánová uses natural materials from which some have an animal origin. By this she refers to traces of the physical existence living beings are leaving behind. It is important to her to try to make the immaterial tangible, to condense the unknown and abstract in a form. The works made of wood or stone are shaped by cuts, cavities and facet-like play with edges and plain surfaces. For Vendula Fabiánová, every work embodies a concept, a thought, an idea. She understands the interplay between the wearer's body and the jewellery object as that of two bodies. Based on this, wearing jewellery may become a performance or a personal ritual. In her view, the worn piece of jewellery develops into a continuation of the body and the mind on a physical, aesthetic and conceptual level.

 
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Brice Garret. Pendant: Workshop - A Participatory Jewellery Project, 2019. Plaster, pigments, cord.. 115 x 41 x 4 cm. Photo by: Brice Garret. 
. “Workshop” is a participatory jewellery project that has been taking place with different groups since 2016 and in which the participants learn the basics of mould making and casting. They produce pendants and thus contribute to an installation. In this way, the aim is to examine and learn how the value of jewellery is conveyed, experienced and perceived when it is worn, viewed and manufactured. The starting point is the reflection and the memory of the participants' own personal jewellery. This is the inspiration to create pendants via clay mould making. The archetypal, jewellery-shaped casts are repeatedly divided, revised and produced together in the group. The result is a constantly growing, changing installation that deals with how materials and work processes can be changed and transformed. The pendants are of various shapes, including stylized floral, geometric and symbolic shapes or seem to be based on found objects. The colours tend to be pastel and matte. In his project, Brice Garrett emphasizes the social components of jewellery - in making and wearing and also reflects on the values of jewellery. Covid-19 completely changed the parameters for this project. Under the new circumstances, not only relationships with materials and objects have been questioned, but also public and private life, intimacy and the collective experiences with objects.
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.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Brice Garret
Pendant: Workshop - A Participatory Jewellery Project, 2019
Plaster, pigments, cord.
115 x 41 x 4 cm
Photo by: Brice Garret

“Workshop” is a participatory jewellery project that has been taking place with different groups since 2016 and in which the participants learn the basics of mould making and casting. They produce pendants and thus contribute to an installation. In this way, the aim is to examine and learn how the value of jewellery is conveyed, experienced and perceived when it is worn, viewed and manufactured. The starting point is the reflection and the memory of the participants' own personal jewellery. This is the inspiration to create pendants via clay mould making. The archetypal, jewellery-shaped casts are repeatedly divided, revised and produced together in the group. The result is a constantly growing, changing installation that deals with how materials and work processes can be changed and transformed. The pendants are of various shapes, including stylized floral, geometric and symbolic shapes or seem to be based on found objects. The colours tend to be pastel and matte. In his project, Brice Garrett emphasizes the social components of jewellery - in making and wearing and also reflects on the values of jewellery. Covid-19 completely changed the parameters for this project. Under the new circumstances, not only relationships with materials and objects have been questioned, but also public and private life, intimacy and the collective experiences with objects.

 
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Hanna Kim. Brooch: Mistakes of Retus 1, 2019. Plastic, sterling silver.. 13 x 8.5 x 3 cm. Photo by: KC Studio. 
. According to Kim Hanna, perception consists of discontinuous moments, whereby connections between these moments can be viewed as continuous - it, therefore, seems impossible to recognize an objective fact as such. An optical illusion distorts objective shapes to make human perception easier. Kim Hanna deals with this problem of objective and subjective perception, with the components to which perception is bound, and transfers them to her jewellery. She works with regularly arranged elements made of plastic in contrasting colours. These thin platelets are arranged in such a way that they arrange themselves into curving strands that intertwine and overlap, creating a three-dimensional, dynamic, seemingly moving composition. The precisely and mathematically calculated patterns are perceived and interpreted differently by the viewer, as the visual and psychological levels are combined in the perception. The resulting effect of the optical illusion is different for each viewer, and therefore completely subjective.
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.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Hanna Kim
Brooch: Mistakes of Retus 1, 2019
Plastic, sterling silver.
13 x 8.5 x 3 cm
Photo by: KC Studio

According to Kim Hanna, perception consists of discontinuous moments, whereby connections between these moments can be viewed as continuous - it, therefore, seems impossible to recognize an objective fact as such. An optical illusion distorts objective shapes to make human perception easier. Kim Hanna deals with this problem of objective and subjective perception, with the components to which perception is bound, and transfers them to her jewellery. She works with regularly arranged elements made of plastic in contrasting colours. These thin platelets are arranged in such a way that they arrange themselves into curving strands that intertwine and overlap, creating a three-dimensional, dynamic, seemingly moving composition. The precisely and mathematically calculated patterns are perceived and interpreted differently by the viewer, as the visual and psychological levels are combined in the perception. The resulting effect of the optical illusion is different for each viewer, and therefore completely subjective.

 
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Steven KP. Brooch: Partially Undone Knot, 2020. Cherry wood, leather, sterling silver.. 16 x 4.5 x 1.5 cm. Photo by: Rob Chron. 
. In his knot-shaped wooden brooches, Steve KP deals with the problem of perception by others and social pressure. The background is queer discourses. The topics are adapting, the apparent insertion into existing conventional and predictable structures in order to live without fear in a system that opposes the acting out of the authentic self, as this is still classified as not conforming to the norm. For Steven KP the knotwork became an opportunity to explore life with trauma in a slow and intense way, an approach that also corresponds to this condition of life. Even before starting work, he recognizes the knots and their shapes in the wooden blank. While carving and refining, the knots become progressively lighten and loosen. The series is titled "partially undone knot", which Steven KP understands as a state that is to be placed between the final tightening and the undone knot. However, his knots have the privilege of being able to remain in this state forever. In doing so, Steven KP deliberately tries to come close to the visual appearance of a real knot. Only when you touch it does it become apparent that the knots are made of wood. For him, the knots are a sign of development. At the same time, they have an obligation that their owner takes care of them. In the brooches connection and tenderness are the leitmotifs for Steven KP.
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.   SOLD   
.  . Steven KP
Brooch: Partially Undone Knot, 2020
Cherry wood, leather, sterling silver.
16 x 4.5 x 1.5 cm
Photo by: Rob Chron

In his knot-shaped wooden brooches, Steve KP deals with the problem of perception by others and social pressure. The background is queer discourses. The topics are adapting, the apparent insertion into existing conventional and predictable structures in order to live without fear in a system that opposes the acting out of the authentic self, as this is still classified as not conforming to the norm. For Steven KP the knotwork became an opportunity to explore life with trauma in a slow and intense way, an approach that also corresponds to this condition of life. Even before starting work, he recognizes the knots and their shapes in the wooden blank. While carving and refining, the knots become progressively lighten and loosen. The series is titled "partially undone knot", which Steven KP understands as a state that is to be placed between the final tightening and the undone knot. However, his knots have the privilege of being able to remain in this state forever. In doing so, Steven KP deliberately tries to come close to the visual appearance of a real knot. Only when you touch it does it become apparent that the knots are made of wood. For him, the knots are a sign of development. At the same time, they have an obligation that their owner takes care of them. In the brooches connection and tenderness are the leitmotifs for Steven KP.

 
  SOLD  
 

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Alischa Kilburg. Object: Two steps from here, 2020. Woolen yarn cotton fabric, foam, polyester fabric, steel wire, stainless steel sheet.. 34 x 26 x 5.5 cm. Photo by: Laura Schleder, Alischa Kilburg. 
. In her textile body objects, Alischa Kilburg deals with the theme of the border as an inconspicuous line that nevertheless creates separation, but also connections or transitions, but in any case, reveals differences. Alischa Kilburg deals with this topic in materials such as textiles and metal (stainless steel, steel, nickel silver). The resulting textile body objects alternate between the areas of fashion, jewellery, and objects and draws on their specific material groups. In order to create new surfaces, old clothes were separated and connected with different textile materials, metal was partially embroidered, drilled, or bent to match and linked to the textile object by sewing. The metal connections make it possible to attach the objects to the body or to clothing. The stability of the metal and the softness, as well as the mobility of the textile, produce an interesting contrast. Alischa Kilburg creates body objects that can also be seen as a complement to existing clothing, and like jewellery supplement it and set accents.
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.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Alischa Kilburg
Object: Two steps from here, 2020
Woolen yarn cotton fabric, foam, polyester fabric, steel wire, stainless steel sheet.
34 x 26 x 5.5 cm
Photo by: Laura Schleder, Alischa Kilburg

In her textile body objects, Alischa Kilburg deals with the theme of the border as an inconspicuous line that nevertheless creates separation, but also connections or transitions, but in any case, reveals differences. Alischa Kilburg deals with this topic in materials such as textiles and metal (stainless steel, steel, nickel silver). The resulting textile body objects alternate between the areas of fashion, jewellery, and objects and draws on their specific material groups. In order to create new surfaces, old clothes were separated and connected with different textile materials, metal was partially embroidered, drilled, or bent to match and linked to the textile object by sewing. The metal connections make it possible to attach the objects to the body or to clothing. The stability of the metal and the softness, as well as the mobility of the textile, produce an interesting contrast. Alischa Kilburg creates body objects that can also be seen as a complement to existing clothing, and like jewellery supplement it and set accents.

 
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Triin Kukk. Necklace: Venus was here, 2018. Quartz, rubber.. 9.3 x 6 x 2 cm. Photo by: Triin Kukk. 
. Triin Kukk's work focuses entirely on researching the material, its properties, and its effects. By carving the quartz loses its rock characteristics and instead acquires subtlety, delicacy, and an ethereal impression - properties that are usually not associated with rock. The appearance irritates the viewer and invites them to touch the work in order to assure. The pieces are rounded in shape and form gently and slightly irregularly curved ovals. The surface is even and smooth and underlines the milky shimmer of the stone. The works have a sculptural appearance and can be worn as pendants.
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.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Triin Kukk
Necklace: Venus was here, 2018
Quartz, rubber.
9.3 x 6 x 2 cm
Photo by: Triin Kukk

Triin Kukk's work focuses entirely on researching the material, its properties, and its effects. By carving the quartz loses its rock characteristics and instead acquires subtlety, delicacy, and an ethereal impression - properties that are usually not associated with rock. The appearance irritates the viewer and invites them to touch the work in order to assure. The pieces are rounded in shape and form gently and slightly irregularly curved ovals. The surface is even and smooth and underlines the milky shimmer of the stone. The works have a sculptural appearance and can be worn as pendants.

 
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Tianyi Liang. Brooch: Stone Knows the Answer - No Title, 2020. Leftover-red jasper, leftover-blue quartz, copper, steel, hematite pigment, artificial pigment, paint.. 8 x 6 x 3 cm. Photo by: Tianyi Liang. 
. The works in the series “Stone knows the Answer” are based on Tianyi Liang’s collection of stone remains. She esteems the process of selecting or rejecting a particular piece of stone as a creative process. Here the artist plays with the fate of the stones. In her work, she deals with the many layers and connections of coincidences and conscious decisions that determine the formation of objects and thus cause new coincidences. The works fascinate due to their sculptural quality, their unusual shape, and the carefully considered colour combination. Front and back are related to each other; the pin of the brooch develops from motifs on the front in the sense of a continuation. These works, in which the moment of chance plays such a decisive role, prove to be extremely well thought out, planned, and conceived in detail.
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.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Tianyi Liang
Brooch: Stone Knows the Answer - No Title, 2020
Leftover-red jasper, leftover-blue quartz, copper, steel, hematite pigment, artificial pigment, paint.
8 x 6 x 3 cm
Photo by: Tianyi Liang

The works in the series “Stone knows the Answer” are based on Tianyi Liang’s collection of stone remains. She esteems the process of selecting or rejecting a particular piece of stone as a creative process. Here the artist plays with the fate of the stones. In her work, she deals with the many layers and connections of coincidences and conscious decisions that determine the formation of objects and thus cause new coincidences. The works fascinate due to their sculptural quality, their unusual shape, and the carefully considered colour combination. Front and back are related to each other; the pin of the brooch develops from motifs on the front in the sense of a continuation. These works, in which the moment of chance plays such a decisive role, prove to be extremely well thought out, planned, and conceived in detail.

 
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Annora Poppe. Necklace: The Polder, 2020. Aluminum, sodalite.. 42 x 20 x 6 cm. Photo by: Jekaterina Smirnova. 
. Annora Poppe's work reflects her inspiration from nature and landscape, especially from that of her childhood - a farm in Noordoostpolder in the Netherlands. It was only during her studies that she became aware of the influence the polder landscape and its surroundings had on her. The wide landscape areas on the former seabed were carefully planned, drawn, and precisely laid out. The landscape with its straight, clear lines shows lush colours in spring, but deep grey tones in winter. It is an artificial landscape created by machines and human hands, an environment in which culture and nature are connected. Annora Poppe relates in the choice and handling of the material in her work to the handling of the landscape in this area of the Netherlands, evincing respect for its strength, power, and beauty. The works combine different stones and metals. These remain clearly separated from each other, giving the works a certain additive, but definite and clear quality. An archaic appearance is particularly noticeable in the metal parts, which results from the irregular shape of the individual elements, their rough surface, and the unusual closures.
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.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Annora Poppe
Necklace: The Polder, 2020
Aluminum, sodalite.
42 x 20 x 6 cm
Photo by: Jekaterina Smirnova

Annora Poppe's work reflects her inspiration from nature and landscape, especially from that of her childhood - a farm in Noordoostpolder in the Netherlands. It was only during her studies that she became aware of the influence the polder landscape and its surroundings had on her. The wide landscape areas on the former seabed were carefully planned, drawn, and precisely laid out. The landscape with its straight, clear lines shows lush colours in spring, but deep grey tones in winter. It is an artificial landscape created by machines and human hands, an environment in which culture and nature are connected. Annora Poppe relates in the choice and handling of the material in her work to the handling of the landscape in this area of the Netherlands, evincing respect for its strength, power, and beauty. The works combine different stones and metals. These remain clearly separated from each other, giving the works a certain additive, but definite and clear quality. An archaic appearance is particularly noticeable in the metal parts, which results from the irregular shape of the individual elements, their rough surface, and the unusual closures.

 
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Jiwon Song. Ring: Untitled, 2019. Smoky quartz.. 3.1 x 2.9 x 1.3 cm. Photo by: Yiyeon Kim. From series: 30 Rings. 
. The series “30 Rings” is dedicated to the transparent crystal structure of the materials, which are emphasized by the innovative stone carving and combined with new shapes. The natural stone grain formed the starting point for the creation of the shape of the ring. Jiwon Song is always looking for new shapes, variants, and surfaces. The aim is to convey pleasure to the wearer with the agreeably cool and refreshing rings. When worn for a long time, the ring radiates warmth, is meant to give energy and vitality. The shapes either have a rather classic silhouette, or they combine the ring shape with raw, rough, irregular elements. The beauty lies in the handling of the material, the elaboration of the fine colour nuances, and the structure of the stone. It is a restrained work that invites to experience the material.
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.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Jiwon Song
Ring: Untitled, 2019
Smoky quartz.
3.1 x 2.9 x 1.3 cm
Photo by: Yiyeon Kim
From series: 30 Rings

The series “30 Rings” is dedicated to the transparent crystal structure of the materials, which are emphasized by the innovative stone carving and combined with new shapes. The natural stone grain formed the starting point for the creation of the shape of the ring. Jiwon Song is always looking for new shapes, variants, and surfaces. The aim is to convey pleasure to the wearer with the agreeably cool and refreshing rings. When worn for a long time, the ring radiates warmth, is meant to give energy and vitality. The shapes either have a rather classic silhouette, or they combine the ring shape with raw, rough, irregular elements. The beauty lies in the handling of the material, the elaboration of the fine colour nuances, and the structure of the stone. It is a restrained work that invites to experience the material.

 
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Tim Udvardi-Lakos. Set: Die Grenze zum Nichts (The Border to nothingness), 2020. Silver, steel wire, powder lacquer.. 6 x 6 x 3 cm each. Photo by: Tim Udvardi-Lakos. The series of nine brooches deals with the theme of the development of all being out of nothing and back into nothing, with the lack of a closed state of being, in the place of which there is a constant cycle of becoming and passing. According to Tim Udvardi-Lakos, from the very beginning of its being, everything carries already its own inescapable non-being within itself. The passing away leaves an emptiness instead of being, which can soon be filled again with a new being. He takes up this theme in the shape of his brooches. These are created in the form of a torus, a bead-like surface with a free space in the middle. For Tim Udvardi-Lakos, the white, polished silver symbolizes an as yet unwritten sheet - nothing. The silver is covered with a thin layer of varnish, which means the boundary to nothing. The powder coating, applied using a specially developed technique, is partly transparent, and elsewhere shows spots of deep black. The black as the densest colour mass represents the traces of being. The transparent lacquer gives the surface a depth in which the fine structure of the silver can be perceived. The brooch pin also forms a circle. Tim Udvardi-Lakos defines his work as influenced by Suprematism and Wabi-Sabi. With his work, he would like to create an awareness of a holistic, connected, cosmic order.
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.  Contact the artist for price  
.  A series of 9 brooches. 
.  . Tim Udvardi-Lakos
Set: Die Grenze zum Nichts (The Border to nothingness), 2020
Silver, steel wire, powder lacquer.
6 x 6 x 3 cm each
Photo by: Tim Udvardi-Lakos

The series of nine brooches deals with the theme of the development of all being out of nothing and back into nothing, with the lack of a closed state of being, in the place of which there is a constant cycle of becoming and passing. According to Tim Udvardi-Lakos, from the very beginning of its being, everything carries already its own inescapable non-being within itself. The passing away leaves an emptiness instead of being, which can soon be filled again with a new being. He takes up this theme in the shape of his brooches. These are created in the form of a torus, a bead-like surface with a free space in the middle. For Tim Udvardi-Lakos, the white, polished silver symbolizes an as yet unwritten sheet - nothing. The silver is covered with a thin layer of varnish, which means the boundary to nothing. The powder coating, applied using a specially developed technique, is partly transparent, and elsewhere shows spots of deep black. The black as the densest colour mass represents the traces of being. The transparent lacquer gives the surface a depth in which the fine structure of the silver can be perceived. The brooch pin also forms a circle. Tim Udvardi-Lakos defines his work as influenced by Suprematism and Wabi-Sabi. With his work, he would like to create an awareness of a holistic, connected, cosmic order.
 
A series of 9 brooches.
 

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Elisa Zorraquin. Ring: I Can Handle It IV, 2019. Brass, copper.. 12.5 x 6 x 3.5 cm. Photo by: Elisa Zorraquin. 
. “I can handle it” is a series of rings that resemble handles on a chest of drawers. They are hand-cut from copper, soldered, and powder-coated in bright colours. They look like large stylized flowers. The rings are more like clasps that encircle several fingers at the back and are then led around to end in large flowers that almost completely cover the fingers. With reference to Susan Stewart's book "On Longing: Narratives of the Miniature, the Gigantic, the Souvenir, the Collection" (1993), Elisa Zorraquin refers to the possibility of things to open up a secret world, to reveal narratives and actions beyond the usual areas of perception. The rings are intended to convey the feeling of familiarity and spontaneity. Elisa Zorraquin sees them as tools that help us to find our way around the world and to enjoy every day, the profane wonders and beauties of the environment. With her work she tries to penetrate the boundaries between the self and the world by means of jewellery, relying on close observation of the home and the immediate environment.
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.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Elisa Zorraquin
Ring: I Can Handle It IV, 2019
Brass, copper.
12.5 x 6 x 3.5 cm
Photo by: Elisa Zorraquin

“I can handle it” is a series of rings that resemble handles on a chest of drawers. They are hand-cut from copper, soldered, and powder-coated in bright colours. They look like large stylized flowers. The rings are more like clasps that encircle several fingers at the back and are then led around to end in large flowers that almost completely cover the fingers. With reference to Susan Stewart's book "On Longing: Narratives of the Miniature, the Gigantic, the Souvenir, the Collection" (1993), Elisa Zorraquin refers to the possibility of things to open up a secret world, to reveal narratives and actions beyond the usual areas of perception. The rings are intended to convey the feeling of familiarity and spontaneity. Elisa Zorraquin sees them as tools that help us to find our way around the world and to enjoy every day, the profane wonders and beauties of the environment. With her work she tries to penetrate the boundaries between the self and the world by means of jewellery, relying on close observation of the home and the immediate environment.

 
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Pavlína Končická. Brooch: Tool spirit, 2020. Tool steel, stainless steel, brass.. 15 x 8 x 0.2 cm. Photo by: Pavlína Končická. 
. The flat, simple brooches from the series “Tool Spirit” look vaguely familiar. They are rectangular, triangular, tapered to a point, slender, widening towards the middle, and connected by the rectangular or rounded opening in the middle. On closer inspection, they are reminiscent of the cross-section of tools, and in fact, they are thin slices of hammers and axes that Pavlína Končická found in the junkyard. Processing transforms both their form and their function, giving them a new life, while at the same time remaining a symbol of their previous, original purpose. With these brooches, Pavlína Končická wants to remind of the importance of tools for human development. The shape of the brooches still contains information about their original size and purpose, about the hard work that was done with them. They should be understood as an appreciation of these everyday objects and as thanks.
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.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Pavlína Končická
Brooch: Tool spirit, 2020
Tool steel, stainless steel, brass.
15 x 8 x 0.2 cm
Photo by: Pavlína Končická

The flat, simple brooches from the series “Tool Spirit” look vaguely familiar. They are rectangular, triangular, tapered to a point, slender, widening towards the middle, and connected by the rectangular or rounded opening in the middle. On closer inspection, they are reminiscent of the cross-section of tools, and in fact, they are thin slices of hammers and axes that Pavlína Končická found in the junkyard. Processing transforms both their form and their function, giving them a new life, while at the same time remaining a symbol of their previous, original purpose. With these brooches, Pavlína Končická wants to remind of the importance of tools for human development. The shape of the brooches still contains information about their original size and purpose, about the hard work that was done with them. They should be understood as an appreciation of these everyday objects and as thanks.

 
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Szilvia Zita Rémiás. Bracelet: WOW 3, 2018. Silicone, steel.. 5 x 6.5 x 5.5 cm. Photo by: Anna Palkó. 
. Szilvia Zita Rémiás’s aim was to provide an unexpected experience. At first glance, her works seem like panels resting flat on a surface. When placed around the wrist, the panel suddenly turns into a bracelet with an organic-looking scale structure. Experiments with sponges served as inspiration. The scales enable a surface to function in a three-dimensional and flexible manner as well as lying flat. In this state, the scales are scarcely visible. The work is carried out in silicone with steel lamella that contracts when touched and forms a bracelet. Different surface structures were created by imprinting sponges in the liquid silicone mass. By retaining the original white color of the material, the sculptural impression of the work is emphasized.
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.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Szilvia Zita Rémiás
Bracelet: WOW 3, 2018
Silicone, steel.
5 x 6.5 x 5.5 cm
Photo by: Anna Palkó

Szilvia Zita Rémiás’s aim was to provide an unexpected experience. At first glance, her works seem like panels resting flat on a surface. When placed around the wrist, the panel suddenly turns into a bracelet with an organic-looking scale structure. Experiments with sponges served as inspiration. The scales enable a surface to function in a three-dimensional and flexible manner as well as lying flat. In this state, the scales are scarcely visible. The work is carried out in silicone with steel lamella that contracts when touched and forms a bracelet. Different surface structures were created by imprinting sponges in the liquid silicone mass. By retaining the original white color of the material, the sculptural impression of the work is emphasized.

 
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Yaiza Rodríguez Sánchez. Brooch: A tientas Nº 2, 2020. Basswood, silicone, copper, brass, steel, acrylic paint, cinnamon.. 6.5 x 7 x 6 cm. Photo by: Yaiza Rodríguez Sánchez. 
. In her brooches, Yaiza Rodriguez Sánchez deals with the relationship to the body, the relationship between bodies and space and the forms of behaviour that depend on it. She examines the influence of materials and shapes on sensory perception. She combines handicraft, researching material by hand, and modern technologies such as laser cutting or thermoforming in order to produce repetitive patterns, geometric shapes or quick prototypes. She regards her work as a kind of organ. The brooches seem to bulge out of the skin, to connect with the body. The irritating pieces of jewellery want to be explored and discovered. They invite reflection and discussion and call for a more intense experience and perception. In fact, they are small bump-like spheres that are opened to reveal an organ-like interior. This consists of differently sized bubble-like structures that appear like sensory cells, an impression that is underlined by the pink colouring.
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.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Yaiza Rodríguez Sánchez
Brooch: A tientas Nº 2, 2020
Basswood, silicone, copper, brass, steel, acrylic paint, cinnamon.
6.5 x 7 x 6 cm
Photo by: Yaiza Rodríguez Sánchez

In her brooches, Yaiza Rodriguez Sánchez deals with the relationship to the body, the relationship between bodies and space and the forms of behaviour that depend on it. She examines the influence of materials and shapes on sensory perception. She combines handicraft, researching material by hand, and modern technologies such as laser cutting or thermoforming in order to produce repetitive patterns, geometric shapes or quick prototypes. She regards her work as a kind of organ. The brooches seem to bulge out of the skin, to connect with the body. The irritating pieces of jewellery want to be explored and discovered. They invite reflection and discussion and call for a more intense experience and perception. In fact, they are small bump-like spheres that are opened to reveal an organ-like interior. This consists of differently sized bubble-like structures that appear like sensory cells, an impression that is underlined by the pink colouring.

 
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Sungkyung Yoon. Earrings: Untitled, 2020. Cotton yarn.. 55 x 30 x 4 cm. Photo by: Sungkyung Yoon. From series: Backen macht Freude (baking is fun). 
. Sungkyung Yoon's inspiration came from the baking book “Backen macht Freude”, first published in 1930, which is the best-selling baking book in Germany and is characterized by its simple description of the recipes. Sunkyung Yoon was particularly fascinated by the old-fashioned images in the book and the various decorations for cakes and biscuits. They suggested a decoration for the body, with the obvious answer being jewellery, which should now be designed differently and based on the model of the cookbook. First of all, colours, decorations and recipes were collected from the book, with the aim of designing oversized pieces of jewellery from textiles reflecting the research and the impressions conveyed by the baking book. The works were created using various techniques such as embroidery, knitting, jacquard weaving. The works alternate between different areas of jewellery (e.g. earring and necklace), between clothing and jewellery (e.g. a collar). In their imagination and cheerfulness, they convey the fascination and pleasure that Sungkyung Yoon experienced through the illustrations in the baking book.
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.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Sungkyung Yoon
Earrings: Untitled, 2020
Cotton yarn.
55 x 30 x 4 cm
Photo by: Sungkyung Yoon
From series: Backen macht Freude (baking is fun)

Sungkyung Yoon's inspiration came from the baking book “Backen macht Freude”, first published in 1930, which is the best-selling baking book in Germany and is characterized by its simple description of the recipes. Sunkyung Yoon was particularly fascinated by the old-fashioned images in the book and the various decorations for cakes and biscuits. They suggested a decoration for the body, with the obvious answer being jewellery, which should now be designed differently and based on the model of the cookbook. First of all, colours, decorations and recipes were collected from the book, with the aim of designing oversized pieces of jewellery from textiles reflecting the research and the impressions conveyed by the baking book. The works were created using various techniques such as embroidery, knitting, jacquard weaving. The works alternate between different areas of jewellery (e.g. earring and necklace), between clothing and jewellery (e.g. a collar). In their imagination and cheerfulness, they convey the fascination and pleasure that Sungkyung Yoon experienced through the illustrations in the baking book.

 
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Jiwon Yang. Brooch: Asteroid2019MB2, 2019. Wool, silver, nickel silver, blue sapphire.. 20 x 14 x 1.7 cm. Photo by: Byungchul Jeon. 
. The works from the series “Mikrokosmos Minus” focus on Jiwon Yang's severe shortsightedness. In it she handles the experience of how things change when they are looked at without glasses, that they enlarge, blur, and disappear, only remaining as vague forms and areas of colour. The impression remains as if she were standing in the fog, through which everything is only vaguely perceived. She translates this feeling of sight into her brooches which represent different characters. Here, the slender, clearly articulated, average proportioned forms of a body are depicted as seen with glasses, contrasting with huge heads, the features of which are blurred by the felt technique, and which thus articulate the view without glasses. This opposition is underlined by the white of the body with black contours and inner lines, from which the brightly coloured heads stand out clearly. The heads almost look like huge balloons that grow out of the body and are about to burst. Jiwon Yang understands this implementation of her own visual experience as a feeling of liberation and freedom.
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.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Jiwon Yang
Brooch: Asteroid2019MB2, 2019
Wool, silver, nickel silver, blue sapphire.
20 x 14 x 1.7 cm
Photo by: Byungchul Jeon

The works from the series “Mikrokosmos Minus” focus on Jiwon Yang's severe shortsightedness. In it she handles the experience of how things change when they are looked at without glasses, that they enlarge, blur, and disappear, only remaining as vague forms and areas of colour. The impression remains as if she were standing in the fog, through which everything is only vaguely perceived. She translates this feeling of sight into her brooches which represent different characters. Here, the slender, clearly articulated, average proportioned forms of a body are depicted as seen with glasses, contrasting with huge heads, the features of which are blurred by the felt technique, and which thus articulate the view without glasses. This opposition is underlined by the white of the body with black contours and inner lines, from which the brightly coloured heads stand out clearly. The heads almost look like huge balloons that grow out of the body and are about to burst. Jiwon Yang understands this implementation of her own visual experience as a feeling of liberation and freedom.

 
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Marleen Bauer. Henrieke Neumeyer. Vaia Tatopoulou. Textile: Compagno, 2020. Cotton, polyester.. Folded: 70 x 40 x 8 cm; Unfolded: 354 x 40 x 1 cm. Photo by: Marleen Bauer, Henrieke Neumeyer, Vaia Tatopoulou. 
. The basic question in the project was: “How can object-related boundaries in the process of eating first be made visible, gradually overcome, and finally strengthen through interaction the social structure during eating?” Eating is an everyday occurrence, but conditioned through a multitude of aspects - including space, time, history, rituals, social environment, utensils. Eating usually takes place at a table with plates that are connected by a tablecloth that is supposed to protect and decorate the table and at the same time can provide an opportunity for communication. The “Compagno” project (Latin: com - with and panis - bread) refers to the person with whom the bread is shared. The place for this is a strip of fabric that can be unfolded to different lengths - depending on the relationship between the participants - the less intimate it is, the greater a distance can be created. The unfolded length of fabric is accompanied by napkins and light bamboo bowls. The scene can be extended to an unlimited number of people with additional lengths of fabric. The aim is to reinterpret movement sequences, to break culture-related conventions, to allow playful sequences to arise: “The performative character of the process should strengthen the community-building effect of eating. Unfamiliar experiences with oneself and the other person while sharing and exploring culinary objects correlate with new dynamics of collective dining. Instead of following traditional and tested rituals, one embarks on an experiment that can be experienced regardless of cultural and social background."
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.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Marleen Bauer
Henrieke Neumeyer
Vaia Tatopoulou
Textile: Compagno, 2020
Cotton, polyester.
Folded: 70 x 40 x 8 cm; Unfolded: 354 x 40 x 1 cm
Photo by: Marleen Bauer, Henrieke Neumeyer, Vaia Tatopoulou

The basic question in the project was: “How can object-related boundaries in the process of eating first be made visible, gradually overcome, and finally strengthen through interaction the social structure during eating?” Eating is an everyday occurrence, but conditioned through a multitude of aspects - including space, time, history, rituals, social environment, utensils. Eating usually takes place at a table with plates that are connected by a tablecloth that is supposed to protect and decorate the table and at the same time can provide an opportunity for communication. The “Compagno” project (Latin: com - with and panis - bread) refers to the person with whom the bread is shared. The place for this is a strip of fabric that can be unfolded to different lengths - depending on the relationship between the participants - the less intimate it is, the greater a distance can be created. The unfolded length of fabric is accompanied by napkins and light bamboo bowls. The scene can be extended to an unlimited number of people with additional lengths of fabric. The aim is to reinterpret movement sequences, to break culture-related conventions, to allow playful sequences to arise: “The performative character of the process should strengthen the community-building effect of eating. Unfamiliar experiences with oneself and the other person while sharing and exploring culinary objects correlate with new dynamics of collective dining. Instead of following traditional and tested rituals, one embarks on an experiment that can be experienced regardless of cultural and social background."
 
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Leonie Burkhardt. Textile: Linum 2, 2019. Cotton, linen, long flax, retting on the ground.. 38 x 32 x 2 cm. Photo by: Jessica Epstein. 
. Leonie Burkhardt's concern is to process European flax in its various shapes and variations - from the raw material to the spun and dyed yarn - in her series of weaving experiments “Linum”. She would like to raise awareness of European flax. Although this is one of the few natural fibre plants that can be grown, processed and produced into fabric in Europe, this processed linen only make up a small proportion of the fabrics sold in Europe and used for the clothing industry. In her series, Leonie Burkhardt would like to combine the various processing stages of flax in one fabric. That is why she employs in addition to the finished linen yarn which serves as weft yarn the raw and partly processed flax fibres in various roasts. The fabrics were woven on different looms - a keyboard loom and a Selectron loom - to achieve different effects. The loom was drawn in batches in order to achieve a certain rhythm, underlined by the use of black and white, and to bring out the material particularly well. The fabrics combine smooth areas with different patterns and different fibre insertions that can appear as loops, fringes or strands.
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.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Leonie Burkhardt
Textile: Linum 2, 2019
Cotton, linen, long flax, retting on the ground.
38 x 32 x 2 cm
Photo by: Jessica Epstein

Leonie Burkhardt's concern is to process European flax in its various shapes and variations - from the raw material to the spun and dyed yarn - in her series of weaving experiments “Linum”. She would like to raise awareness of European flax. Although this is one of the few natural fibre plants that can be grown, processed and produced into fabric in Europe, this processed linen only make up a small proportion of the fabrics sold in Europe and used for the clothing industry. In her series, Leonie Burkhardt would like to combine the various processing stages of flax in one fabric. That is why she employs in addition to the finished linen yarn which serves as weft yarn the raw and partly processed flax fibres in various roasts. The fabrics were woven on different looms - a keyboard loom and a Selectron loom - to achieve different effects. The loom was drawn in batches in order to achieve a certain rhythm, underlined by the use of black and white, and to bring out the material particularly well. The fabrics combine smooth areas with different patterns and different fibre insertions that can appear as loops, fringes or strands.

 
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Fanny Casano. Textile: Mets les voiles, 2020. Sail fabric.. 62 x 55 x 10 cm. Photo by: Raphaëlle Mueller. 
. For Fanny Casano, the wind-powered sailboat is one of the oldest means of transport and symbolizes the spirit of adventure. For her designs, she recycles boat sails. Thanks to an innovative and ingenious folding technique her designs can be partially collapsed and unfolded when necessary and when the weather changes. The reference to the material for sailing and the related associations convey some adventure in everyday life. Her designs include a narrow pocket that folds out into a larger pouch, a visor cap, the side parts of which can be folded out as face protection, and a blouson that can be converted into a windbreaker with a hood. The bright yellow colouring makes the work appear cheerful, and at the same time has a warning function due to the signal effect.
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.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Fanny Casano
Textile: Mets les voiles, 2020
Sail fabric.
62 x 55 x 10 cm
Photo by: Raphaëlle Mueller

For Fanny Casano, the wind-powered sailboat is one of the oldest means of transport and symbolizes the spirit of adventure. For her designs, she recycles boat sails. Thanks to an innovative and ingenious folding technique her designs can be partially collapsed and unfolded when necessary and when the weather changes. The reference to the material for sailing and the related associations convey some adventure in everyday life. Her designs include a narrow pocket that folds out into a larger pouch, a visor cap, the side parts of which can be folded out as face protection, and a blouson that can be converted into a windbreaker with a hood. The bright yellow colouring makes the work appear cheerful, and at the same time has a warning function due to the signal effect.

 
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Tamar Dgani. Textile: Rust Rug 2, 2019. Linen, rust.. 150 x 100 x 0.5 cm. Photo by: Ariel Medina. 
. Tamar Dgani slowly weaves her rust carpets by hand with rusty iron rods, which she integrates into the weave structure. She tests rust as a pigment and colours the carpet in a controlled manner in order to achieve a special pattern that moves between planned and random. The considerations behind the carpets relate to the encounter between nature and humans and to the establishment of a new element in between - one that is at the same time natural but also artificially created. To begin this experiment, Tamar Dgani decided to study the relationship between linen and iron, both of which emerge from the earth. In a series of actions, she tried out the different possibilities of the relationship, so that she plays through the entire spectrum from the orderly human design to the originality of the material. The carpets are made up of several small, self-contained units, each of which presents different experiments, but which are linked by their colour and structure.
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.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Tamar Dgani
Textile: Rust Rug 2, 2019
Linen, rust.
150 x 100 x 0.5 cm
Photo by: Ariel Medina

Tamar Dgani slowly weaves her rust carpets by hand with rusty iron rods, which she integrates into the weave structure. She tests rust as a pigment and colours the carpet in a controlled manner in order to achieve a special pattern that moves between planned and random. The considerations behind the carpets relate to the encounter between nature and humans and to the establishment of a new element in between - one that is at the same time natural but also artificially created. To begin this experiment, Tamar Dgani decided to study the relationship between linen and iron, both of which emerge from the earth. In a series of actions, she tried out the different possibilities of the relationship, so that she plays through the entire spectrum from the orderly human design to the originality of the material. The carpets are made up of several small, self-contained units, each of which presents different experiments, but which are linked by their colour and structure.

 
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Justine Gaignault. Textile: Lain 3, 2020. Wool, linen.. 84 x 172 x 2 cm. Photo by: Laura Stevens. 
. Justine Gaignault's concern in her project “Lain” is to improve the qualities of the two natural materials wool and linen and to combine them using their specific properties. Wool gives the linen luminosity, softness and elasticity, while the flax fibre increases the durability and strength of the wool fibres. By hand-felting the wool, the fabrics gain volume and elasticity, which creates a playful tension between the two materials. The linen pants bulge out and create a plastic structure. Justine Gaignault worked with the Belgian jacquard weaving company "B & T Textilia" for her collection. Her collection also addresses the possibility of combining craft and industrial methods, as each piece is machine-made and then hand-felted. The plaids are characterized by a fresh colour scheme with bright accents and a pattern that looks rather classic and traditional. The relief-like surface structure, which results from the combination of materials, makes the plaids appear attractive and pleasantly soft.
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.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Justine Gaignault
Textile: Lain 3, 2020
Wool, linen.
84 x 172 x 2 cm
Photo by: Laura Stevens

Justine Gaignault's concern in her project “Lain” is to improve the qualities of the two natural materials wool and linen and to combine them using their specific properties. Wool gives the linen luminosity, softness and elasticity, while the flax fibre increases the durability and strength of the wool fibres. By hand-felting the wool, the fabrics gain volume and elasticity, which creates a playful tension between the two materials. The linen pants bulge out and create a plastic structure. Justine Gaignault worked with the Belgian jacquard weaving company "B & T Textilia" for her collection. Her collection also addresses the possibility of combining craft and industrial methods, as each piece is machine-made and then hand-felted. The plaids are characterized by a fresh colour scheme with bright accents and a pattern that looks rather classic and traditional. The relief-like surface structure, which results from the combination of materials, makes the plaids appear attractive and pleasantly soft.

 
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Amit Giladi. Textile: UniQform, 2019. Cotton.. 3.5 x 122 x 5 cm. Photo by: Danieala Abohav. 
. With her project “UniQForm”, Amit Giladi would like to work on minimizing the masses of clothing and fashion items and on improving the environment. For this, she decided on three items of clothing that should meet the needs of a minimalist-minded wearer. They were adapted to the frame dimensions of an industrial loom, whereby care was taken that was no waste of fabric occurs, but that every fabric surface was used. Amit Giladi understands her designs as a kind of uniform, as clothing that can be worn on different events and occasions every day. The pursuit of minimization is also reflected in the material used. For each of the three sets, which she divides into every day, outdoor, and home sets, only one material - cotton - was chosen, because it is easily degradable so that the clothing can later be composted and a cotton field can be fertilized. The designs are uni-sex fashion, designed as a jumpsuit or pants-top combination, comfortably cut, and regulated by a fabric belt. The patterns are printed on the fabric along with the cut.
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.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Amit Giladi
Textile: UniQform, 2019
Cotton.
3.5 x 122 x 5 cm
Photo by: Danieala Abohav

With her project “UniQForm”, Amit Giladi would like to work on minimizing the masses of clothing and fashion items and on improving the environment. For this, she decided on three items of clothing that should meet the needs of a minimalist-minded wearer. They were adapted to the frame dimensions of an industrial loom, whereby care was taken that was no waste of fabric occurs, but that every fabric surface was used. Amit Giladi understands her designs as a kind of uniform, as clothing that can be worn on different events and occasions every day. The pursuit of minimization is also reflected in the material used. For each of the three sets, which she divides into every day, outdoor, and home sets, only one material - cotton - was chosen, because it is easily degradable so that the clothing can later be composted and a cotton field can be fertilized. The designs are uni-sex fashion, designed as a jumpsuit or pants-top combination, comfortably cut, and regulated by a fabric belt. The patterns are printed on the fabric along with the cut.

 
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Shalvah Gottlieb. Textile: Social Reading, 2019. Knit bamboo, rubber yarn hung on wood, metal.. 200 x 50 x 120 cm. Photo by: Anat Roni Cnaani, Moriah Gottlieb. 
. Shalvah Gottlieb's works from the series “Social Reading” are a mixture of a hammock and a floor cushion that conveys a gentle, calming rocking movement, a springy, weightless sitting feeling. They are easy to dismantle and are therefore particularly suitable for a multi-purpose room. Shalvah Gottlieb's life is especially influenced by books and reading. That is why she regrets the decline in private reading and individual reading pleasure. With her project, she would like to encourage people to engage again more with books. In the course of a survey in libraries, she found that most readers would like to have their own private room to read. This desire for privacy in public space was surprising. Based on this, Shalvah Gottlieb concentrated on Ray Oldenburg's idea of “Third Rooms”. The “Third Room” forms a common space in which people can fulfill their longing for community. This position was originally taken over by religious spaces or spaces dedicated to common interests. Libraries have the potential to become such spaces at the current times. However, this requires new equipment that combines the private and the collective, which conveys more casualness and comfort, less the atmosphere of a working place. Shalvag Gottlieb's hybrids present an innovative and attractive solution for this problem.
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.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Shalvah Gottlieb
Textile: Social Reading, 2019
Knit bamboo, rubber yarn hung on wood, metal.
200 x 50 x 120 cm
Photo by: Anat Roni Cnaani, Moriah Gottlieb

Shalvah Gottlieb's works from the series “Social Reading” are a mixture of a hammock and a floor cushion that conveys a gentle, calming rocking movement, a springy, weightless sitting feeling. They are easy to dismantle and are therefore particularly suitable for a multi-purpose room. Shalvah Gottlieb's life is especially influenced by books and reading. That is why she regrets the decline in private reading and individual reading pleasure. With her project, she would like to encourage people to engage again more with books. In the course of a survey in libraries, she found that most readers would like to have their own private room to read. This desire for privacy in public space was surprising. Based on this, Shalvah Gottlieb concentrated on Ray Oldenburg's idea of “Third Rooms”. The “Third Room” forms a common space in which people can fulfill their longing for community. This position was originally taken over by religious spaces or spaces dedicated to common interests. Libraries have the potential to become such spaces at the current times. However, this requires new equipment that combines the private and the collective, which conveys more casualness and comfort, less the atmosphere of a working place. Shalvag Gottlieb's hybrids present an innovative and attractive solution for this problem.

 
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Meytar Hacham. Textile: Playful Nest, 2019. Sponge, polyester, cotton.. 25 x 29 x 25 cm. Photo by: Ariel Medina. 
. Meytar Hacham created a series of playful and architecturally-looking miniature objects that were designed based on colour studies and are intended to combine the aspects of indoor plants and playfulness. She got the stimulus from the planting of her balcony. In this context, she dealt with the processes of germination and plant reproduction. For this purpose, she constructed soft, small objects for combining several plants, studied shape and colour, and created her own textiles and textile connections. Different surfaces and ways of joining fabrics with different embroidery stitches were tested. The colour palette chosen refers to the colourfulness of flora and vegetation so that the textiles harmonize with the plants. A polyester thread is used to connect the fabrics, which is characterized by its sheen and durability. Meytar Hacham wove the fabrics on an industrial loom and screen-printed them. The Japanese ikebana formed the inspiration for the arrangement of the individual elements. The result is bizarre, playful miniature worlds in which textiles and plants are combined in a very unusual way.
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.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Meytar Hacham
Textile: Playful Nest, 2019
Sponge, polyester, cotton.
25 x 29 x 25 cm
Photo by: Ariel Medina

Meytar Hacham created a series of playful and architecturally-looking miniature objects that were designed based on colour studies and are intended to combine the aspects of indoor plants and playfulness. She got the stimulus from the planting of her balcony. In this context, she dealt with the processes of germination and plant reproduction. For this purpose, she constructed soft, small objects for combining several plants, studied shape and colour, and created her own textiles and textile connections. Different surfaces and ways of joining fabrics with different embroidery stitches were tested. The colour palette chosen refers to the colourfulness of flora and vegetation so that the textiles harmonize with the plants. A polyester thread is used to connect the fabrics, which is characterized by its sheen and durability. Meytar Hacham wove the fabrics on an industrial loom and screen-printed them. The Japanese ikebana formed the inspiration for the arrangement of the individual elements. The result is bizarre, playful miniature worlds in which textiles and plants are combined in a very unusual way.

 
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Karolina Muncheskul. Textile: Sea Dragon, 2019. Polyester, acrylic.. 32 x 50 x 35 cm. Photo by: Roni Cnaani. 
. Leah Goldberg's children's book about a magical hat served as inspiration for these works. Karolina Muncheskul fulfilled the idea of a magical hat by combining a hat and a toy - a soft toy in the shape of an animal. She knitted children's hats from cotton, viscose, wool, and polyester in such a way that hat and toy fuse together. By tying up threads, the hat can be quickly transformed into a toy. This convertible hat has a magical quality, makes children's dreams come true. The motifs for the hat/toy are based on the memory of Karolina Muncheskul’s own toys: different animals and dinosaurs. The hat stimulates the imagination and invites to play and at the same time warms and protects the head. The results are cheerful, imaginative, astonishing mixed creations, which when worn as a hat unfold their special charm and wit. The children seem to carry jellyfish, snails, turtles, and dragons on their heads.
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.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Karolina Muncheskul
Textile: Sea Dragon, 2019
Polyester, acrylic.
32 x 50 x 35 cm
Photo by: Roni Cnaani

Leah Goldberg's children's book about a magical hat served as inspiration for these works. Karolina Muncheskul fulfilled the idea of a magical hat by combining a hat and a toy - a soft toy in the shape of an animal. She knitted children's hats from cotton, viscose, wool, and polyester in such a way that hat and toy fuse together. By tying up threads, the hat can be quickly transformed into a toy. This convertible hat has a magical quality, makes children's dreams come true. The motifs for the hat/toy are based on the memory of Karolina Muncheskul’s own toys: different animals and dinosaurs. The hat stimulates the imagination and invites to play and at the same time warms and protects the head. The results are cheerful, imaginative, astonishing mixed creations, which when worn as a hat unfold their special charm and wit. The children seem to carry jellyfish, snails, turtles, and dragons on their heads.

 
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Ramona Myrseth. Textile: Dressing in the Artic, 2020. Wool.. 100 x 50 cm. Photo by: Ramona Salo. 
. Ramona Myrseth grew up in a multicultural community in Northern Norway. Her childhood was strongly shaped by winter, spectacular landscapes, and natural phenomena such as the northern lights and the midnight sun. Growing up in the Arctic had a major influence on her work. Ramona Myrseth combines these influences with a modern aesthetic. As a local Sami designer and storyteller, she explores materials, textures, contrasts, cultural and personal memories and tries to navigate between different perspectives with a needle and thread as a tool. Her hand-knitted works are made to wear in the arctic landscape. The balaclava cap with mouth and nose cover was created as an homage to the ski mask and the mountain culture in the north. It should warm and in view of the current situation also protect. It is complemented by a short sweater that conveys a fashionable note. At the same time, it is Ramona Myrseth's concern, inspired by the Arctic landscape and the Sami philosophies, to remind people that they have to adapt to the rules and limits of the landscape and accept that they cannot rule and control nature.
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.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Ramona Myrseth
Textile: Dressing in the Artic, 2020
Wool.
100 x 50 cm
Photo by: Ramona Salo

Ramona Myrseth grew up in a multicultural community in Northern Norway. Her childhood was strongly shaped by winter, spectacular landscapes, and natural phenomena such as the northern lights and the midnight sun. Growing up in the Arctic had a major influence on her work. Ramona Myrseth combines these influences with a modern aesthetic. As a local Sami designer and storyteller, she explores materials, textures, contrasts, cultural and personal memories and tries to navigate between different perspectives with a needle and thread as a tool. Her hand-knitted works are made to wear in the arctic landscape. The balaclava cap with mouth and nose cover was created as an homage to the ski mask and the mountain culture in the north. It should warm and in view of the current situation also protect. It is complemented by a short sweater that conveys a fashionable note. At the same time, it is Ramona Myrseth's concern, inspired by the Arctic landscape and the Sami philosophies, to remind people that they have to adapt to the rules and limits of the landscape and accept that they cannot rule and control nature.

 
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Johanna Stella Rogalla. Textile: Untitled, 2020. Warp: Tencel. Weft: linen, silk, micro modal.. 170 x 80 x 1 cm. Photo by: Louisa Bäcker. From series: Ein Teil der Verflechtung sein (Being part of the entanglement). 
. The textiles from the project “Being a part of the entanglement” are dedicated to the topic of dialogue and are inspired by the works of the artist Franz Erhard Walter, who created textile structures, which are only completed by participation and active intervention of others. Johanna Stella Rogalla designed multi-layered fabrics in which she plays with ambivalence: The works are clearly fabric - albeit very fine, delicate - but the composition appears unclear and irritating due to the superimposition of several layers so that the wish arises to clarify this through close vision and touch. It must now be considered which layers should be revealed and which should remain hidden. According to Johanna Stella Rogalla, “a process of constant balancing out should arise; between one's own submission and the appropriation of the material. Textiles play a key role here as a factor of complexity. The interdisciplinarity helps to increase the respective potential by considering the complexity of the respective design and thought processes.” The fabrics are multi-layered with at least two to a maximum of six layers, which intersect within the fabric in both the warp and weft directions. In this way, textiles were created that can be read in different directions. The fabrics can be opened in different places. The superimposition of the individual delicate and monochrome layers creates optical moiré effects, which cause further irritation and an abundance of different color nuances.
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.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Johanna Stella Rogalla
Textile: Untitled, 2020
Warp: Tencel. Weft: linen, silk, micro modal.
170 x 80 x 1 cm
Photo by: Louisa Bäcker
From series: Ein Teil der Verflechtung sein (Being part of the entanglement)

The textiles from the project “Being a part of the entanglement” are dedicated to the topic of dialogue and are inspired by the works of the artist Franz Erhard Walter, who created textile structures, which are only completed by participation and active intervention of others. Johanna Stella Rogalla designed multi-layered fabrics in which she plays with ambivalence: The works are clearly fabric - albeit very fine, delicate - but the composition appears unclear and irritating due to the superimposition of several layers so that the wish arises to clarify this through close vision and touch. It must now be considered which layers should be revealed and which should remain hidden. According to Johanna Stella Rogalla, “a process of constant balancing out should arise; between one's own submission and the appropriation of the material. Textiles play a key role here as a factor of complexity. The interdisciplinarity helps to increase the respective potential by considering the complexity of the respective design and thought processes.” The fabrics are multi-layered with at least two to a maximum of six layers, which intersect within the fabric in both the warp and weft directions. In this way, textiles were created that can be read in different directions. The fabrics can be opened in different places. The superimposition of the individual delicate and monochrome layers creates optical moiré effects, which cause further irritation and an abundance of different color nuances.

 
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Dominyka Sidabraite. Textile: Flora Skin - Die Annäherung an eine Oberfläche (The approach to a surface), 2017. Alpaca wool, linen.. 200 x 70 x 1 cm. Photo by: Dovile Sermokas. 
. Dominyka Sidabraite explores the question of creating functional as well as aesthetic surfaces in knitted textiles on the basis of biomimetic principles. Her considerations are based on the comparison of textiles and skin. The starting point is the protective function against external influences that textiles have for its wearer. Dominyka Sidabraite esteems textiles as a protective border between body and environment. The human skin has to be protected by textiles, while in the plant world the skins accommodate all the necessary protective functions in them. The designs from the “Flora Skin” project take up these properties on a functional and aesthetic level. Dominyka Sidabraite’s leitmotif of the collection was the functional principle of the leaf, based on the study of rhododendron and snowball leaves. Different textile connections were derived from the microscopically recorded, layered structures of the leaf surfaces, which led to a bilateral membrane. One side has a rather soft, open character, while the other has a smooth, closed character. The surfaces derive their functionality solely from the natural materials linen and wool. By combining animal and vegetable fibers, they are on the one hand repellent against dirt and bacteria and on the other hand heat-insulating. The knitted surfaces, which can be used in both fashion and interior design, are sustainable and durable.
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.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Dominyka Sidabraite
Textile: Flora Skin - Die Annäherung an eine Oberfläche (The approach to a surface), 2017
Alpaca wool, linen.
200 x 70 x 1 cm
Photo by: Dovile Sermokas

Dominyka Sidabraite explores the question of creating functional as well as aesthetic surfaces in knitted textiles on the basis of biomimetic principles. Her considerations are based on the comparison of textiles and skin. The starting point is the protective function against external influences that textiles have for its wearer. Dominyka Sidabraite esteems textiles as a protective border between body and environment. The human skin has to be protected by textiles, while in the plant world the skins accommodate all the necessary protective functions in them. The designs from the “Flora Skin” project take up these properties on a functional and aesthetic level. Dominyka Sidabraite’s leitmotif of the collection was the functional principle of the leaf, based on the study of rhododendron and snowball leaves. Different textile connections were derived from the microscopically recorded, layered structures of the leaf surfaces, which led to a bilateral membrane. One side has a rather soft, open character, while the other has a smooth, closed character. The surfaces derive their functionality solely from the natural materials linen and wool. By combining animal and vegetable fibers, they are on the one hand repellent against dirt and bacteria and on the other hand heat-insulating. The knitted surfaces, which can be used in both fashion and interior design, are sustainable and durable.

 
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Sveti Spivak. Textile: Relationship, 2019. Cotton.. 170 x 60 cm. Photo by: Roni Cnaani. 
. In his “Relationship” project, Sveti Spivak deals with the structure of a piece of clothing and the relationship between it and its pattern. For this purpose, he designed an overall that consists of two parts: a lower part and a jacket-like upper part with a hood. The overall can be changed depending on the weather, the occasion, and the wishes of its wearer. Sveti Spivak sees this type of combination as a middle ground between a simple, comfortable piece of clothing that is easy to put on and the desire for individuality and a personal touch. This combination of saving time and freedom of choice is important to him. At the same time, the striving for minimization corresponds to the requirements of the present and is an alternative to mass production and industrialization. The inspiration for the geometric pattern of the top came from looking at the urban landscape: “Just as an overall is built from one basic part & more complex parts are worn on it, so too the city is a combination of endless, smooth & long roads & buildings that grow above us like glass mushrooms, high & low."
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.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Sveti Spivak
Textile: Relationship, 2019
Cotton.
170 x 60 cm
Photo by: Roni Cnaani

In his “Relationship” project, Sveti Spivak deals with the structure of a piece of clothing and the relationship between it and its pattern. For this purpose, he designed an overall that consists of two parts: a lower part and a jacket-like upper part with a hood. The overall can be changed depending on the weather, the occasion, and the wishes of its wearer. Sveti Spivak sees this type of combination as a middle ground between a simple, comfortable piece of clothing that is easy to put on and the desire for individuality and a personal touch. This combination of saving time and freedom of choice is important to him. At the same time, the striving for minimization corresponds to the requirements of the present and is an alternative to mass production and industrialization. The inspiration for the geometric pattern of the top came from looking at the urban landscape: “Just as an overall is built from one basic part & more complex parts are worn on it, so too the city is a combination of endless, smooth & long roads & buildings that grow above us like glass mushrooms, high & low."

 
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Molly Turner. Textile: Coagulate top, 2020. Silicone, cotton, drill base, thread.. 70 x 70 x 20 cm. Photo by: Molly Turner. 
. The skirt and top from the "Rubber Orchid" series are a further development of an earlier project based on Donna Haraway's Cyborg Manifesto. The project explored women's relationship with technology in an effort to undermine patriarchal science fiction archetypes. Molly Turner also wanted to reflect on the importance of handicrafts in the digital age. Both approaches led to work with knitted elastic garments moulded from silicone. She combined this with medical details from waist trainers and posture correctors to present a kind of post-cyber feminist uniform. The moulded silicone pieces were created in an attempt to produce a 100% recyclable garment as well as a vegan and environmentally friendly alternative to conventional leather goods. The modern, artificial material contrasts with the strongly stylized traditional flower pattern.
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.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Molly Turner
Textile: Coagulate top, 2020
Silicone, cotton, drill base, thread.
70 x 70 x 20 cm
Photo by: Molly Turner

The skirt and top from the "Rubber Orchid" series are a further development of an earlier project based on Donna Haraway's Cyborg Manifesto. The project explored women's relationship with technology in an effort to undermine patriarchal science fiction archetypes. Molly Turner also wanted to reflect on the importance of handicrafts in the digital age. Both approaches led to work with knitted elastic garments moulded from silicone. She combined this with medical details from waist trainers and posture correctors to present a kind of post-cyber feminist uniform. The moulded silicone pieces were created in an attempt to produce a 100% recyclable garment as well as a vegan and environmentally friendly alternative to conventional leather goods. The modern, artificial material contrasts with the strongly stylized traditional flower pattern.

 
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Maartje van Dijck. Textile: Play with machine, 2020. Polyester, polyester yarn, sublimation ink.. 90 x 45 x 45 cm. Photo by: Frijke Coumans. 
. In her project “Play with machines”, Maartje van Dijck examines how the embroidery machine can manipulate clothing. In the mass production of fashion, machines are used to produce the same items of clothing over and over again. Martje van Dijck reverses this process by using the embroidery machine in a playful way to create individual pieces of clothing. She puts the garments under the machine whereby she avoids spreading them flat and lets herself be surprised by the result. Unusual folds and volumes are created, the silhouette is totally changed. For her work Maartje van Dijck uses basic items of clothing in order to gain as much scope as possible, e.g. by adding fabric. Brush strokes served as inspiration for operating the embroidery machine. The project demonstrates a possibility to test and expand the limits of the machine. With this process, Maartje van Dijck wants to combine mass production and individual pieces. Due to the individual character, the garments become special pieces that are loved and therefore worn for longer.
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.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Maartje van Dijck
Textile: Play with machine, 2020
Polyester, polyester yarn, sublimation ink.
90 x 45 x 45 cm
Photo by: Frijke Coumans

In her project “Play with machines”, Maartje van Dijck examines how the embroidery machine can manipulate clothing. In the mass production of fashion, machines are used to produce the same items of clothing over and over again. Martje van Dijck reverses this process by using the embroidery machine in a playful way to create individual pieces of clothing. She puts the garments under the machine whereby she avoids spreading them flat and lets herself be surprised by the result. Unusual folds and volumes are created, the silhouette is totally changed. For her work Maartje van Dijck uses basic items of clothing in order to gain as much scope as possible, e.g. by adding fabric. Brush strokes served as inspiration for operating the embroidery machine. The project demonstrates a possibility to test and expand the limits of the machine. With this process, Maartje van Dijck wants to combine mass production and individual pieces. Due to the individual character, the garments become special pieces that are loved and therefore worn for longer.

 
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Tim van der Loo. Textile: New Blue, 2020. Recycled jeans fibers.. 120 x 80 x 46 cm. Photo by: Tim van der Loo. 
. Tim van der Loo regards waste as a valuable resource. Based on this, he develops new objects, paying particular attention to sustainability and resource-friendly handling of materials. His approach is playful and dedicated to both functional and aesthetic concerns. For the “New Blue” project, he uses discarded jeans, which are cut into small fibers and then connected to form a fleece. Tim van der Loo tried out two manufacturing processes: the industrial fleece creates a uniform surface, while the handmade fleece generates an irregular, rough, structured surface that can be designed according to personal wishes. The fabric is then provided with digitally controlled embroidery to stabilize the fleece and to apply the pattern. When washing, the non-embroidered parts of the fleece material loosen, so that the remaining cut pieces can be sewn together to make trousers. The detached fleece parts can be used again. The embroidery can respond to trends and personal tastes.
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.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Tim van der Loo
Textile: New Blue, 2020
Recycled jeans fibers.
120 x 80 x 46 cm
Photo by: Tim van der Loo

Tim van der Loo regards waste as a valuable resource. Based on this, he develops new objects, paying particular attention to sustainability and resource-friendly handling of materials. His approach is playful and dedicated to both functional and aesthetic concerns. For the “New Blue” project, he uses discarded jeans, which are cut into small fibers and then connected to form a fleece. Tim van der Loo tried out two manufacturing processes: the industrial fleece creates a uniform surface, while the handmade fleece generates an irregular, rough, structured surface that can be designed according to personal wishes. The fabric is then provided with digitally controlled embroidery to stabilize the fleece and to apply the pattern. When washing, the non-embroidered parts of the fleece material loosen, so that the remaining cut pieces can be sewn together to make trousers. The detached fleece parts can be used again. The embroidery can respond to trends and personal tastes.

 
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Lea Dievenow. Object: Le Mystique, 2020. Glass, brass.. 46 x 26.5 x 26.5 cm. Photo by: Lea Dievenow. 
. Lea Dievenow is interested in dealing with the question of reality and illusion. She translates these experiences into objects and their relationship to their surroundings. Her preferred method is to play with light and shadow. With her work she would like to encourage self-reflection and questioning of one's own perception and environment. In the work “Le Mystique” she visualizes this search. The starting point is the creation of a kind of tiny world that is protected by a glass dome, which allows at the same time a look into another cosmos. The viewer should take time to look carefully at the details and, based on this, deal with the question of reality and illusion. Depending on the point of view of the observer, the inside of the object changes - it appears to float or to move. The light settings of different intensities are used to project linear shadow images onto walls and ceilings, through which the object changes the atmosphere of the room.
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.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Lea Dievenow
Object: Le Mystique, 2020
Glass, brass.
46 x 26.5 x 26.5 cm
Photo by: Lea Dievenow

Lea Dievenow is interested in dealing with the question of reality and illusion. She translates these experiences into objects and their relationship to their surroundings. Her preferred method is to play with light and shadow. With her work she would like to encourage self-reflection and questioning of one's own perception and environment. In the work “Le Mystique” she visualizes this search. The starting point is the creation of a kind of tiny world that is protected by a glass dome, which allows at the same time a look into another cosmos. The viewer should take time to look carefully at the details and, based on this, deal with the question of reality and illusion. Depending on the point of view of the observer, the inside of the object changes - it appears to float or to move. The light settings of different intensities are used to project linear shadow images onto walls and ceilings, through which the object changes the atmosphere of the room.

 
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Louis Grant. Wall piece: Marked Me Like a Bloodstain, 2019. Glass.. 21 x 18 x 2 cm. Photo by: Adam McGrath. 
. “Marked me like a Bloodstrain” from the series “Breakable Heaven” plays with the viewer's expectations of glass in an architectural context. Louis Grant chooses the shape of small, rectangular, coloured glass plates. The superimposition of different colours and densities creates a composition with an unclear spatial structure. From a distance, the panels appear smooth and regular, but the colours and certain irregularities convey deviations in perfection. At the same time, this increases the haptic component of the work and makes it an experience for the viewer in terms of sensory perception. The glass plates are presented at right angles to each other in a corner of the room. The result is a strange mixture of weight and poise. In his work, Louis Grant deals with the subject of failure, the exploration of the “real self” and one's own sexuality based on a process of deconstruction. Through its specific materiality between solid and liquid states, transparent and opaque appearance, the glass appears to him as a medium that is able to symbolize the state of non-binary sexuality.
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.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Louis Grant
Wall piece: Marked Me Like a Bloodstain, 2019
Glass.
21 x 18 x 2 cm
Photo by: Adam McGrath

“Marked me like a Bloodstrain” from the series “Breakable Heaven” plays with the viewer's expectations of glass in an architectural context. Louis Grant chooses the shape of small, rectangular, coloured glass plates. The superimposition of different colours and densities creates a composition with an unclear spatial structure. From a distance, the panels appear smooth and regular, but the colours and certain irregularities convey deviations in perfection. At the same time, this increases the haptic component of the work and makes it an experience for the viewer in terms of sensory perception. The glass plates are presented at right angles to each other in a corner of the room. The result is a strange mixture of weight and poise. In his work, Louis Grant deals with the subject of failure, the exploration of the “real self” and one's own sexuality based on a process of deconstruction. Through its specific materiality between solid and liquid states, transparent and opaque appearance, the glass appears to him as a medium that is able to symbolize the state of non-binary sexuality.

 
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Valerie Likhacheva. Vase: Aurora, 2020. Glass.. 30 x 12 x 12 cm. Photo by: SUPSS. 
. Valerie Likhacheva's vases from the series “Aurora” are irregularly shaped by glass blowing and cutting. The name of the series is derived from both Aurora, the ancient goddess of the dawn, and the Aurora Borealis, the northern lights. Both forms of light served as inspiration for the choice of colours and the structures of the vases. Different shades of blue predominate, as well as irregular structures with melted glass sections that are folded, plastically formed and napped. The curved, ribbon-like, intensely coloured glass elements seem to translate the aurora borealis in terms of both shape and colour and transform it into a decoration for the vases. These richly varied surfaces give the vases their special charm and increase at the same time the effect of the light on the glass surface.
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.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Valerie Likhacheva
Vase: Aurora, 2020
Glass.
30 x 12 x 12 cm
Photo by: SUPSS

Valerie Likhacheva's vases from the series “Aurora” are irregularly shaped by glass blowing and cutting. The name of the series is derived from both Aurora, the ancient goddess of the dawn, and the Aurora Borealis, the northern lights. Both forms of light served as inspiration for the choice of colours and the structures of the vases. Different shades of blue predominate, as well as irregular structures with melted glass sections that are folded, plastically formed and napped. The curved, ribbon-like, intensely coloured glass elements seem to translate the aurora borealis in terms of both shape and colour and transform it into a decoration for the vases. These richly varied surfaces give the vases their special charm and increase at the same time the effect of the light on the glass surface.

 
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Heidi Nicholson. Object: Speleogenesis, 2020. Glass.. 26.5 x 15 x 15 cm. Photo by: Heidi Nicholson. 
. Heidi Nicholson's inspirations are geological forces and their effects on the beauty of the landscape. She is particularly interested in what happens in and above the earth as well as in the relationship between these two elements, between the hidden and the visible. She recognizes a parallel relationship in human beings concerning the concealing and revealing of their own feelings, the exploration of the individual psyche. On the technical and handicraft side, she is interested in new glass processing methods. In the works from the series “Speleogenesis”, a vessel is thrown into molten glass, whereby the geological forces of heat and pressure are associated. Colours and structures are created by adding metals and oxides, which change in contact with the hot glass and form bubbles. Inside the glass, fascinating, dynamic movements, textures, and colour gradients arise, which alternate between change and the freezing of a moment.
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.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Heidi Nicholson
Object: Speleogenesis, 2020
Glass.
26.5 x 15 x 15 cm
Photo by: Heidi Nicholson

Heidi Nicholson's inspirations are geological forces and their effects on the beauty of the landscape. She is particularly interested in what happens in and above the earth as well as in the relationship between these two elements, between the hidden and the visible. She recognizes a parallel relationship in human beings concerning the concealing and revealing of their own feelings, the exploration of the individual psyche. On the technical and handicraft side, she is interested in new glass processing methods. In the works from the series “Speleogenesis”, a vessel is thrown into molten glass, whereby the geological forces of heat and pressure are associated. Colours and structures are created by adding metals and oxides, which change in contact with the hot glass and form bubbles. Inside the glass, fascinating, dynamic movements, textures, and colour gradients arise, which alternate between change and the freezing of a moment.

 
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Vele Ondřey. Vase: Dranoel, 2020. Glass.. 35 x 10 x 10 cm. Photo by: SUPSS. 
. The "Dranoel" vases are inspired by the human anatomy, especially the structure of the various limbs. Therefore their shape is reminiscent of arms, thighs and muscles. This impression is underlined by the choice of red and white colours. Strands of coloured bands allow tendons to be associated, fine red lines that are densely arranged, in turn, tissue or blood vessels. The dynamic handling of the works is based on the brushwork in paintings. The drawing on the vases is based on an unfinished study by Leonardo da Vinci, whose work and research interests inspired the series. Based on this, works of classic form were created, which appear extremely lively due to the contrasting colours and the dynamics of the drawing.
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.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Vele Ondřey
Vase: Dranoel, 2020
Glass.
35 x 10 x 10 cm
Photo by: SUPSS

The "Dranoel" vases are inspired by the human anatomy, especially the structure of the various limbs. Therefore their shape is reminiscent of arms, thighs and muscles. This impression is underlined by the choice of red and white colours. Strands of coloured bands allow tendons to be associated, fine red lines that are densely arranged, in turn, tissue or blood vessels. The dynamic handling of the works is based on the brushwork in paintings. The drawing on the vases is based on an unfinished study by Leonardo da Vinci, whose work and research interests inspired the series. Based on this, works of classic form were created, which appear extremely lively due to the contrasting colours and the dynamics of the drawing.

 
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Davide Ronco. Vase: 753397 - BB, 2019. Concrete.. 62 x 46 x 17 cm. Photo by: Davide Ronco. From series: L'illusion des Sosies. 
. The works from the series “L'illusion des sosies” (transl.: The Lookalike Illusion) are made of concrete. For Davide Ronco, concrete as the second most widely used material in the world manifests the human influence on planet earth. He chose the title of the series with reference to the Capgras Syndrome, a psychiatric disorder in which the person concerned believes that people close to him/her have been replaced by doppelgangers. Joseph Capgras and Jean Reboul-Lachaux originally called the syndrome "l'illusion des sosies". Davide Ronco takes up in his concrete works this lookalike illusion insofar as he refers to Styrofoam packaging. Packaging and concrete objects are similar in shape, texture, and details, but they are two different things. Davide Ronco sees styrofoam packaging as characteristic of contemporary consumer society: it is used once for worldwide safe transport, where it precisely depicts the shape of the items sent in it and is then disposed of as waste. In Davide Ronco's work, they are now given permanence through the material concrete. At the same time, David Ronco employs the idea of form and original: the original is depicted in the form of the styrofoam packaging, but the form cast inside has a completely different external appearance. The cast still appears as a reminder of earlier forms. The results are monumental works of archaic, mysterious appearance.
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.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Davide Ronco
Vase: 753397 - BB, 2019
Concrete.
62 x 46 x 17 cm
Photo by: Davide Ronco
From series: L'illusion des Sosies

The works from the series “L'illusion des sosies” (transl.: The Lookalike Illusion) are made of concrete. For Davide Ronco, concrete as the second most widely used material in the world manifests the human influence on planet earth. He chose the title of the series with reference to the Capgras Syndrome, a psychiatric disorder in which the person concerned believes that people close to him/her have been replaced by doppelgangers. Joseph Capgras and Jean Reboul-Lachaux originally called the syndrome "l'illusion des sosies". Davide Ronco takes up in his concrete works this lookalike illusion insofar as he refers to Styrofoam packaging. Packaging and concrete objects are similar in shape, texture, and details, but they are two different things. Davide Ronco sees styrofoam packaging as characteristic of contemporary consumer society: it is used once for worldwide safe transport, where it precisely depicts the shape of the items sent in it and is then disposed of as waste. In Davide Ronco's work, they are now given permanence through the material concrete. At the same time, David Ronco employs the idea of form and original: the original is depicted in the form of the styrofoam packaging, but the form cast inside has a completely different external appearance. The cast still appears as a reminder of earlier forms. The results are monumental works of archaic, mysterious appearance.

 
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Thalea Schmalenberg. Vase: Resonance of Raw No. 04, 2019. Blown glass.. 20 x 8 x 8 cm. Photo by: Thalea Schmalenberg. 
. In her project "The Resonance of Raw", Thalea Schmalenberg deals with the combination of traditional craftsmanship and regional materials on the appearance of products. The visibility of traces on the material due to the manual production method should lead to an awareness of traditional material qualities and manufacturing processes. These should encourage a more conscious consumption of everyday objects. The project is dedicated to the combination of basket weaving and glass. Basket weaving, through which storage and transport vessels were created, offered itself for the investigations as one of the oldest crafts. Handed down early is the combination of clay or glass vessels and wickerwork, with the latter forming a protective cover around the fragile vessel. Theresa Schmalenberg took up this idea and modified it to the extent that the once protective wickerwork cover becomes a form-giving element. Her aim was to try out the shape and process design of serial objects together with the glassmaker Peter Kuchinke. The wickerwork functioned as a molding tool in the manual glass production process. Their experiments testify to the influence of the different types of basketry with regard to structural properties, durability, and aesthetic effect. The glass is blown into the plaited shape and adopts its silhouette and surface texture.
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.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Thalea Schmalenberg
Vase: Resonance of Raw No. 04, 2019
Blown glass.
20 x 8 x 8 cm
Photo by: Thalea Schmalenberg

In her project "The Resonance of Raw", Thalea Schmalenberg deals with the combination of traditional craftsmanship and regional materials on the appearance of products. The visibility of traces on the material due to the manual production method should lead to an awareness of traditional material qualities and manufacturing processes. These should encourage a more conscious consumption of everyday objects. The project is dedicated to the combination of basket weaving and glass. Basket weaving, through which storage and transport vessels were created, offered itself for the investigations as one of the oldest crafts. Handed down early is the combination of clay or glass vessels and wickerwork, with the latter forming a protective cover around the fragile vessel. Theresa Schmalenberg took up this idea and modified it to the extent that the once protective wickerwork cover becomes a form-giving element. Her aim was to try out the shape and process design of serial objects together with the glassmaker Peter Kuchinke. The wickerwork functioned as a molding tool in the manual glass production process. Their experiments testify to the influence of the different types of basketry with regard to structural properties, durability, and aesthetic effect. The glass is blown into the plaited shape and adopts its silhouette and surface texture.

 
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Robin Wolf. Photograph: CyanolochbildMe, 2020. Watercolour paper.. Photo by: Robin Wolf. 
. Robin Wolf's experimental work is based on pinhole cameras, cyanotypes, and instant photography. His concern is the occupation with traditional techniques and their possibilities as well as their application for new conceptions and designs. The aim was to create completely new works by combining different techniques. For the pinhole camera, Robin Wolf developed fixtures and inserts made of various transparent materials that change the size of the hole, the number and position of the holes, and thus transform the appearance of the motif. The experiments with the cyanotype, demonstrate the attraction of a high proportion of white. Robin Wolf combined cyanotype with the images of the pinhole camera, creating pinhole cyanotypes with a very unique aesthetic, including very abstract motifs that stimulate the viewer's imagination. Robin Wolf also combined instant photography with cyanotype. New motifs were developed by injecting the cyanotype liquid, by drying, exposing, and soaking the polaroid. This combination also resulted in unusual and attractive works. Robin Wolf appreciates particularly the connection between the blue of the liquid in the white frame of an instant photo. The resulting works fascinate by their unusual, enigmatic motifs, the connection of recognizable objects and abstract or alienated motifs, the highlighting of atmospheric moments.
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.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Robin Wolf
Photograph: CyanolochbildMe, 2020
Watercolour paper.
Photo by: Robin Wolf

Robin Wolf's experimental work is based on pinhole cameras, cyanotypes, and instant photography. His concern is the occupation with traditional techniques and their possibilities as well as their application for new conceptions and designs. The aim was to create completely new works by combining different techniques. For the pinhole camera, Robin Wolf developed fixtures and inserts made of various transparent materials that change the size of the hole, the number and position of the holes, and thus transform the appearance of the motif. The experiments with the cyanotype, demonstrate the attraction of a high proportion of white. Robin Wolf combined cyanotype with the images of the pinhole camera, creating pinhole cyanotypes with a very unique aesthetic, including very abstract motifs that stimulate the viewer's imagination. Robin Wolf also combined instant photography with cyanotype. New motifs were developed by injecting the cyanotype liquid, by drying, exposing, and soaking the polaroid. This combination also resulted in unusual and attractive works. Robin Wolf appreciates particularly the connection between the blue of the liquid in the white frame of an instant photo. The resulting works fascinate by their unusual, enigmatic motifs, the connection of recognizable objects and abstract or alienated motifs, the highlighting of atmospheric moments.

 
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Daniela Chodilova. Object: Reliquarum, 2020. Wood, glass, water glass, salts.. 50 x 30 x 20 cm. Photo by: Daniela Chodilova. 
. The objects in the series “Reliquarium” consist of double-walled glass vessels. In these, the chemical reaction of salts and water glass on lace creates ornaments and abstract micro-worlds. Daniela Chodilova defines these works as ornamental sculptures that are constantly changing until they finally turn into solid glass. Processes are set in motion through the choice of organic and chemical materials. At the same time, however, chance plays an important role. The forms of the six-part series are inspired by shapes used in chemistry laboratories. The objects, reminiscent of test tubes, sit in or on cubist-style plinths or receptacles to which tubes have been attached that lead to the glasses. This creates a strange mixture of laboratory scenarios and monumental-looking structures.
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.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Daniela Chodilova
Object: Reliquarum, 2020
Wood, glass, water glass, salts.
50 x 30 x 20 cm
Photo by: Daniela Chodilova

The objects in the series “Reliquarium” consist of double-walled glass vessels. In these, the chemical reaction of salts and water glass on lace creates ornaments and abstract micro-worlds. Daniela Chodilova defines these works as ornamental sculptures that are constantly changing until they finally turn into solid glass. Processes are set in motion through the choice of organic and chemical materials. At the same time, however, chance plays an important role. The forms of the six-part series are inspired by shapes used in chemistry laboratories. The objects, reminiscent of test tubes, sit in or on cubist-style plinths or receptacles to which tubes have been attached that lead to the glasses. This creates a strange mixture of laboratory scenarios and monumental-looking structures.

 
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Sophie Herz. Installation: Repertoire, 2019. Limewood.. 240 x 150 x 28 cm. Photo by: Sophie Herz. 
. For Sophie Herz, houses function as carriers for ideas, not just as objects, but also as protagonists, extras or scenery. The installation “Repertoire” consists of 27 individually designed houses, which seem to break out of the bottom of a suspended bag and fall to the floor. This moment of falling is captured in its various stages - some shapes are lying already on the ground, others are floating in the air, while others are still remaining half in the bag. For Sophie Herz, this snapshot symbolizes the act of creative work: the elusive moments of inspiration and creativity, the spontaneous development in different directions. Every idea is like one of those little houses that need to be put back together and connected.
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.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Sophie Herz
Installation: Repertoire, 2019
Limewood.
240 x 150 x 28 cm
Photo by: Sophie Herz

For Sophie Herz, houses function as carriers for ideas, not just as objects, but also as protagonists, extras or scenery. The installation “Repertoire” consists of 27 individually designed houses, which seem to break out of the bottom of a suspended bag and fall to the floor. This moment of falling is captured in its various stages - some shapes are lying already on the ground, others are floating in the air, while others are still remaining half in the bag. For Sophie Herz, this snapshot symbolizes the act of creative work: the elusive moments of inspiration and creativity, the spontaneous development in different directions. Every idea is like one of those little houses that need to be put back together and connected.

 
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Jing Ting Kao. Plate: Tranquil, 2019. African teak wood, urushi lacquer.. 3 x 11.5 x 24.5 cm. Photo by: Jing Ting Kao. 
. In his work, Jing Ting Kao reflects on the increasingly hectic pace of life and the excess of information. He asks you to take your time, focus on yourself and calm down. In this context, he refers to the Japanese and Buddhist traditions that urge people to achieve a feeling of calm and tranquillity, the feeling of Zen. A special form of the Japanese garden is the Zen garden, "Karesansui" (Engl.: "dry landscape"), with its stones and sandy soils. The aim of these gardens is to support the monks in meditation. The wave patterns raked into the sand are reminiscent of the flow of water and are intended to convey peace and tranquillity. The grooved surface structure of Jing Ting Kao's wooden panels is reminiscent of these gardens, while the curved edges are evocative of traditional Japanese roofs. The grooves are inserted parallel to the wood grain with a CNC milling machine and then polished by hand before urushi varnish is applied in such a way that the wood grain remains visible.
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.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Jing Ting Kao
Plate: Tranquil, 2019
African teak wood, urushi lacquer.
3 x 11.5 x 24.5 cm
Photo by: Jing Ting Kao

In his work, Jing Ting Kao reflects on the increasingly hectic pace of life and the excess of information. He asks you to take your time, focus on yourself and calm down. In this context, he refers to the Japanese and Buddhist traditions that urge people to achieve a feeling of calm and tranquillity, the feeling of Zen. A special form of the Japanese garden is the Zen garden, "Karesansui" (Engl.: "dry landscape"), with its stones and sandy soils. The aim of these gardens is to support the monks in meditation. The wave patterns raked into the sand are reminiscent of the flow of water and are intended to convey peace and tranquillity. The grooved surface structure of Jing Ting Kao's wooden panels is reminiscent of these gardens, while the curved edges are evocative of traditional Japanese roofs. The grooves are inserted parallel to the wood grain with a CNC milling machine and then polished by hand before urushi varnish is applied in such a way that the wood grain remains visible.

 
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Diego Schmid. Spoon: Wunsch nach Entwicklung (Desire for Evolution), 2020. Hornbeam.. 19.9 x 6.3 x 2.7 cm. Photo by: Diego Schmid. 
. Diego Schmid's spoons deal with the topic of food. He would like to understand this topic not only on a physical level but also on an emotional and spiritual level. The spoons are characterized by deep bowls and a sculptural handle, which translates the subject of the spoon – various wishes. In the case of the "Desire for Security", the tip of the spoon handle is adorned with tightly wound ribbons that encircle a free center, in the case of "Desire for Development" the stem is designed in the form of an aspiring plant, the bud of which will open and in the case of “Desire for Beauty”, a ball is placed on a harmoniously curved handle as a sign of perfection. Diego Schmid's spoons thus combine functionality and a design statement. In the conception of the spoons, it was also important to him that they convinced from different points of view.
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.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Diego Schmid
Spoon: Wunsch nach Entwicklung (Desire for Evolution), 2020
Hornbeam.
19.9 x 6.3 x 2.7 cm
Photo by: Diego Schmid

Diego Schmid's spoons deal with the topic of food. He would like to understand this topic not only on a physical level but also on an emotional and spiritual level. The spoons are characterized by deep bowls and a sculptural handle, which translates the subject of the spoon – various wishes. In the case of the "Desire for Security", the tip of the spoon handle is adorned with tightly wound ribbons that encircle a free center, in the case of "Desire for Development" the stem is designed in the form of an aspiring plant, the bud of which will open and in the case of “Desire for Beauty”, a ball is placed on a harmoniously curved handle as a sign of perfection. Diego Schmid's spoons thus combine functionality and a design statement. In the conception of the spoons, it was also important to him that they convinced from different points of view.

 
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Anna Schmideder. Object: Hide & Seek, 2019. Spruce.. 120 x 90 x 180 cm. Photo by: Anna Schmideder. 
. The project "hide & seek" wants to create places that invite to linger in the landscape, to look, to listen, and to think in peace, but which can also protect from the weather. Based on different types of landscape and weather conditions, Anna Schmideder designed three different, but basically similar, trail huts. They are all connected by the construction method and the execution in spruce wood. All connections are only created by cutting the strips to length. The huts should have a temporary character and, in their simplicity, adapt to the barren landscape of the Dreiborn plateau, the place where Anna Schmideder conceived the idea for her project. One of the huts is low and can rest partly on a large stone, another can be placed in a hollow and a third resembles a high seat with its long legs and raised position. Depending on the model, they are equipped with necessary extras: The hollow seat has a roof made of folded sheet metal with a projecting part, the hut with the long legs is accessible via a ladder.
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.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Anna Schmideder
Object: Hide & Seek, 2019
Spruce.
120 x 90 x 180 cm
Photo by: Anna Schmideder

The project "hide & seek" wants to create places that invite to linger in the landscape, to look, to listen, and to think in peace, but which can also protect from the weather. Based on different types of landscape and weather conditions, Anna Schmideder designed three different, but basically similar, trail huts. They are all connected by the construction method and the execution in spruce wood. All connections are only created by cutting the strips to length. The huts should have a temporary character and, in their simplicity, adapt to the barren landscape of the Dreiborn plateau, the place where Anna Schmideder conceived the idea for her project. One of the huts is low and can rest partly on a large stone, another can be placed in a hollow and a third resembles a high seat with its long legs and raised position. Depending on the model, they are equipped with necessary extras: The hollow seat has a roof made of folded sheet metal with a projecting part, the hut with the long legs is accessible via a ladder.

 
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Yui Yamaguchi. Bag: Night Wave, Curtain of Light, Sheep Clouds, Evening Glow, 2019. Wood, textile, leather.. each 13.5 x 18 cm or 9.2 x 4.5 cm. Photo by: Gaze fotographica. 
. Yui Yamaguchi's basis for designing the bags was the conception of nature as wearable art. In order to be able to enjoy the beauty of wood outside of the house, Yui Yamaguchi came up with the idea of designing wooden bags in the shape of clutches for stowing the most necessary items. The design always started with the perception of a scene in the grain of the wood, which reflects the history of the tree. A rectangular piece is sawn out of the wood, the straightness of which contrasts with the organic, irregular shape of the tree. The bags have a narrow rod-like closure, cylindrical hinges, a joint with a shoulder strap. The bags are easy to use. Yui Yamaguchi took great care in choosing the different wooden parts for the sides of the bag. The continuity of the grain and the fit of all elements were important to her. The shoulder straps are made of vegetable-tanned leather. For Yui Yamaguchi, each bag has its own character and individual personality, although they match in shape.
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.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Yui Yamaguchi
Bag: Night Wave, Curtain of Light, Sheep Clouds, Evening Glow, 2019
Wood, textile, leather.
each 13.5 x 18 cm or 9.2 x 4.5 cm
Photo by: Gaze fotographica

Yui Yamaguchi's basis for designing the bags was the conception of nature as wearable art. In order to be able to enjoy the beauty of wood outside of the house, Yui Yamaguchi came up with the idea of designing wooden bags in the shape of clutches for stowing the most necessary items. The design always started with the perception of a scene in the grain of the wood, which reflects the history of the tree. A rectangular piece is sawn out of the wood, the straightness of which contrasts with the organic, irregular shape of the tree. The bags have a narrow rod-like closure, cylindrical hinges, a joint with a shoulder strap. The bags are easy to use. Yui Yamaguchi took great care in choosing the different wooden parts for the sides of the bag. The continuity of the grain and the fit of all elements were important to her. The shoulder straps are made of vegetable-tanned leather. For Yui Yamaguchi, each bag has its own character and individual personality, although they match in shape.

 
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Ryota Akiyama. Object: Cracks and Shurinks-Volca04, 2019. Styrofoam, paint.. 45 x 39 x 39 cm. Photo by: Ryota Akiyama. 
. Plastic is a material that has been linked to environmental pollution. It is an increasing concern to replace plastic with sustainable materials and to enforce responsible use of packaging materials. Ryota Akiyama would like to see plastic esteemed value-free as a material with certain properties. He experimented with the material in order to explore its characteristics and to test which shape suits it best, which new shapes could arise. His experiments are based on the variables of temperature and time. For his vases, he used polystyrene, a heat-shrinkable chemical compound, and two types of water-based paints. By changing the variables of heating temperature, thickness, and density of the polystyrene, amount of pigment, humidity and room temperature, exposure time to air before the heating process, etc., the material works itself, human manipulation no longer has any influence, so that for Ryota Akiyama the resulting objects have the character of natural objects. His concern is to move plastic into the group of basic materials such as ceramics, glass, or metal and to consider it beyond all connotations. The result of Ryota Akiyama's experiments are vessels of intense colour and an unusual surface structure. The surfaces are grooved, appear almost frill-like or puffed up, therefore receiving a textile-like appearance.
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.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Ryota Akiyama
Object: Cracks and Shurinks-Volca04, 2019
Styrofoam, paint.
45 x 39 x 39 cm
Photo by: Ryota Akiyama

Plastic is a material that has been linked to environmental pollution. It is an increasing concern to replace plastic with sustainable materials and to enforce responsible use of packaging materials. Ryota Akiyama would like to see plastic esteemed value-free as a material with certain properties. He experimented with the material in order to explore its characteristics and to test which shape suits it best, which new shapes could arise. His experiments are based on the variables of temperature and time. For his vases, he used polystyrene, a heat-shrinkable chemical compound, and two types of water-based paints. By changing the variables of heating temperature, thickness, and density of the polystyrene, amount of pigment, humidity and room temperature, exposure time to air before the heating process, etc., the material works itself, human manipulation no longer has any influence, so that for Ryota Akiyama the resulting objects have the character of natural objects. His concern is to move plastic into the group of basic materials such as ceramics, glass, or metal and to consider it beyond all connotations. The result of Ryota Akiyama's experiments are vessels of intense colour and an unusual surface structure. The surfaces are grooved, appear almost frill-like or puffed up, therefore receiving a textile-like appearance.

 
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Fridolin Bär. Object: Resistance in blue, 2020. Clay.. 35 x 33 x 7 cm. Photo by: Fridolin Bär. 
. For Fridolin Bär, the process of creative activity also has a meditative meaning. For him, it is about conflict, resistance, confrontation and transformation, instinct, and emotions. For him, the material becomes a medium of gestural expression. This becomes obvious in his work "Resistance", which is characterized by a strong, dynamic style, which is conveyed in an almost archaic way in the deep, lively, partly counter-rotating grooves and the heaped-up clay. The glaze follows the ups and downs of the relief in the depth of the colours. In the three-part work "Any emotion you like" Fridolin Bär deals with the emotion itself. He uses the intuitive and meditative side of the work to make the hidden beauty visible and tangible. His concern is to transform abstract feelings into something tangible and transfer them to another medium so that a kind of emotional handprint is created.
. 
.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Fridolin Bär
Object: Resistance in blue, 2020
Clay.
35 x 33 x 7 cm
Photo by: Fridolin Bär

For Fridolin Bär, the process of creative activity also has a meditative meaning. For him, it is about conflict, resistance, confrontation and transformation, instinct, and emotions. For him, the material becomes a medium of gestural expression. This becomes obvious in his work "Resistance", which is characterized by a strong, dynamic style, which is conveyed in an almost archaic way in the deep, lively, partly counter-rotating grooves and the heaped-up clay. The glaze follows the ups and downs of the relief in the depth of the colours. In the three-part work "Any emotion you like" Fridolin Bär deals with the emotion itself. He uses the intuitive and meditative side of the work to make the hidden beauty visible and tangible. His concern is to transform abstract feelings into something tangible and transfer them to another medium so that a kind of emotional handprint is created.

 
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Dennis Demand. Vessel: Grounded, 2020. Low-sintering clay, capsule fired with organic materials such as bark, turnings and sawdust of various types of wood, salt, citrus peel and dried plants.. 100 x 100 x 12 cm. Photo by: Dennis Demand. 
. Dennis Demand is interested in the influence of organic materials on ceramic bodies. He experiments with the formation of bacteria during the decomposition process, with the creation of textures by adding different materials to the slurry and slip, and with the effects during the smoke fire. He also sees the responsibility of the artist-craftsman in dealing with the issues of sustainability and energy balance, which are reflected in his experiments. In his project “Grounded”, these considerations have an impact on the use of a low firing temperature and surface design using renewable raw materials. He is particularly interested in the capsule brand, which for him preserves the transience of nature in every object. The traces of the smoke burn and the soft-appearing surfaces that are created by the sanding give the work its special character. The simple cylinder shape and the atmospheric discoloration in the smoke give them both elegance and a restrained archaic note.
. 
.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Dennis Demand
Vessel: Grounded, 2020
Low-sintering clay, capsule fired with organic materials such as bark, turnings and sawdust of various types of wood, salt, citrus peel and dried plants.
100 x 100 x 12 cm
Photo by: Dennis Demand

Dennis Demand is interested in the influence of organic materials on ceramic bodies. He experiments with the formation of bacteria during the decomposition process, with the creation of textures by adding different materials to the slurry and slip, and with the effects during the smoke fire. He also sees the responsibility of the artist-craftsman in dealing with the issues of sustainability and energy balance, which are reflected in his experiments. In his project “Grounded”, these considerations have an impact on the use of a low firing temperature and surface design using renewable raw materials. He is particularly interested in the capsule brand, which for him preserves the transience of nature in every object. The traces of the smoke burn and the soft-appearing surfaces that are created by the sanding give the work its special character. The simple cylinder shape and the atmospheric discoloration in the smoke give them both elegance and a restrained archaic note.

 
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Nellie Jonsson. Object: Bird Bath, 2019. Stoneware, concrete, textile.. 18 x 35 x 24 cm. Photo by: Nellie Jonsson. 
. In her sculptures, Nellie Jonsson deals with domestic situations, with everyday life. She reflects on functions and situations from this context. She uses animal figures to give her works a special mood, to make them look funny and at the same time a little mysterious. The works are characterized by a certain rawness in the articulation and the surfaces. This is a concern of Nellie Jonsson, as she wants to maintain a direct approach to ceramic. That is why she prefers unglazed surfaces and mixes many different types of clay. She also plays with the tension between two- and three-dimensionality by repeatedly integrating flat surfaces into her work. She understands this as a kind of fake two-dimensional feature since an object is always perceived as three-dimensional. From these considerations and based on the deliberately coarse language of forms and the collage elements, objects full of humour, dynamic, bizarreness, and a certain naivety are created.
. 
.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Nellie Jonsson
Object: Bird Bath, 2019
Stoneware, concrete, textile.
18 x 35 x 24 cm
Photo by: Nellie Jonsson

In her sculptures, Nellie Jonsson deals with domestic situations, with everyday life. She reflects on functions and situations from this context. She uses animal figures to give her works a special mood, to make them look funny and at the same time a little mysterious. The works are characterized by a certain rawness in the articulation and the surfaces. This is a concern of Nellie Jonsson, as she wants to maintain a direct approach to ceramic. That is why she prefers unglazed surfaces and mixes many different types of clay. She also plays with the tension between two- and three-dimensionality by repeatedly integrating flat surfaces into her work. She understands this as a kind of fake two-dimensional feature since an object is always perceived as three-dimensional. From these considerations and based on the deliberately coarse language of forms and the collage elements, objects full of humour, dynamic, bizarreness, and a certain naivety are created.

 
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Dowon Kim. Vase: Halla Jar, 2019. Ceramic (biomaterials).. 30 x 25 x 30 cm. Photo by: Dowon Jungkim. 
. The Korean moon vases by Dowon Kim do not have a perfect aesthetic. In these special times, the slight imperfection of the form and the pleasant surface of the clay convey comfort and confidence, especially for a humanity that has become accustomed to striving for perfection. Dowon Kim uses clay in her work, in which she inserts various natural materials, including the peel of Halla, an orange that is native to a Korean island. The light and soft fibres give the ceramic a strong structure and reduce weight. The vase is only fired once at 600° C. Due to the low firing temperature and the addition of fibres, the ceramic can biodegrade more quickly. For other vases, Dowon Kim mixes the clay not only with orange fibres but also with eggshells. What is important to her is easy biodegradation and the avoidance of unnecessary CO² emissions, which is why she only uses leftovers from local food. The added materials create rough spots and irregular textures on the surface of the vessel, which give the work a special attraction and again convey the beauty of the imperfect.
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.  . Dowon Kim
Vase: Halla Jar, 2019
Ceramic (biomaterials).
30 x 25 x 30 cm
Photo by: Dowon Jungkim

The Korean moon vases by Dowon Kim do not have a perfect aesthetic. In these special times, the slight imperfection of the form and the pleasant surface of the clay convey comfort and confidence, especially for a humanity that has become accustomed to striving for perfection. Dowon Kim uses clay in her work, in which she inserts various natural materials, including the peel of Halla, an orange that is native to a Korean island. The light and soft fibres give the ceramic a strong structure and reduce weight. The vase is only fired once at 600° C. Due to the low firing temperature and the addition of fibres, the ceramic can biodegrade more quickly. For other vases, Dowon Kim mixes the clay not only with orange fibres but also with eggshells. What is important to her is easy biodegradation and the avoidance of unnecessary CO² emissions, which is why she only uses leftovers from local food. The added materials create rough spots and irregular textures on the surface of the vessel, which give the work a special attraction and again convey the beauty of the imperfect.

 
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Jiye Kim. Bag: Petal 01, 2019. Cowhide, magnets.. 24 x 32 x 24 cm. Photo by: Sangdeok Han. 
. The handbags of the series "Petal" focus on the deep creases that arise when carrying large bags. Jiye Kim creates the bags in forms which are based on petal and leaf shapes by using traditional leather saddle techniques. The bags are locked with magnets. The curved contour of the bag contains a curved center that, like a frame, highlights the part of the bag to which the magnetic closure is attached. When the bag is opened, other colours will be visible. This gives an impression similar to overlapping petals. The shape of the objects is unusual and almost makes them look like small sculptures. With her bags, Jiye Kim achieves a successful and convincing mixture of clarity, elegance, surprise, and a flowery-romantic impression.
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.  . Jiye Kim
Bag: Petal 01, 2019
Cowhide, magnets.
24 x 32 x 24 cm
Photo by: Sangdeok Han

The handbags of the series "Petal" focus on the deep creases that arise when carrying large bags. Jiye Kim creates the bags in forms which are based on petal and leaf shapes by using traditional leather saddle techniques. The bags are locked with magnets. The curved contour of the bag contains a curved center that, like a frame, highlights the part of the bag to which the magnetic closure is attached. When the bag is opened, other colours will be visible. This gives an impression similar to overlapping petals. The shape of the objects is unusual and almost makes them look like small sculptures. With her bags, Jiye Kim achieves a successful and convincing mixture of clarity, elegance, surprise, and a flowery-romantic impression.

 
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Josephine Larsen. Object: Sur(e)forms, 2020. Ceramic.. 66 x 160 x 95 cm. Photo by: Josephine Larsen. 
. Josephine Larsen's large ceramic works are of a seemingly monumental simplicity and at the same time radiate timelessness. Josephine Larsen is interested in the relationship between the human body and three-dimensional matter, the reaction to mass, volume, structure, and density, or the lack of these properties. She understands her work to be inspired by architecture and also envisions her presentation in an architectural context. Her concern is to counter the traditional notions of ceramic sculpture, which aims to present a single piece on a pedestal. Her ceramic works, on the other hand, should invite an examination of both form and space. They should also give the opportunity to experience the object and the surrounding space from different perspectives.
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.  . Josephine Larsen
Object: Sur(e)forms, 2020
Ceramic.
66 x 160 x 95 cm
Photo by: Josephine Larsen

Josephine Larsen's large ceramic works are of a seemingly monumental simplicity and at the same time radiate timelessness. Josephine Larsen is interested in the relationship between the human body and three-dimensional matter, the reaction to mass, volume, structure, and density, or the lack of these properties. She understands her work to be inspired by architecture and also envisions her presentation in an architectural context. Her concern is to counter the traditional notions of ceramic sculpture, which aims to present a single piece on a pedestal. Her ceramic works, on the other hand, should invite an examination of both form and space. They should also give the opportunity to experience the object and the surrounding space from different perspectives.

 
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Anette Leegaard Fuhlendorff. Object: Prepper Ceramics, 2020. Porcelain, recycled ceramic waste.. 30 x 100 x 30 cm. Photo by: Ole Akhøj. 
. Usually Anette Leegaard Fuhlendorff works with plaster moulds in which she pours porcelain. With this series of cylindrical vessels, she experimented with slip casting without using plaster moulds. Instead, she used shapes made from other materials – already existing and available materials. This recycling concept reflects her striving for environmentally friendly, resource-saving production. She worked intensively on alternative shapes, materials and fire possibilities in order to cause less damage to the environment. This in turn led to a design of objects that she would not have achieved with traditional methods. Her porcelain cylinders are characterized by an atmospheric drawing on the surface of attractive colours, by deep relief, a fine rough surface, melted beads or a fine speckle. The surfaces are in their structure, the individual forms of the reliefs and the colours with their atmospheric brown and blue tones reminiscent of nature.
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.  . Anette Leegaard Fuhlendorff
Object: Prepper Ceramics, 2020
Porcelain, recycled ceramic waste.
30 x 100 x 30 cm
Photo by: Ole Akhøj

Usually Anette Leegaard Fuhlendorff works with plaster moulds in which she pours porcelain. With this series of cylindrical vessels, she experimented with slip casting without using plaster moulds. Instead, she used shapes made from other materials – already existing and available materials. This recycling concept reflects her striving for environmentally friendly, resource-saving production. She worked intensively on alternative shapes, materials and fire possibilities in order to cause less damage to the environment. This in turn led to a design of objects that she would not have achieved with traditional methods. Her porcelain cylinders are characterized by an atmospheric drawing on the surface of attractive colours, by deep relief, a fine rough surface, melted beads or a fine speckle. The surfaces are in their structure, the individual forms of the reliefs and the colours with their atmospheric brown and blue tones reminiscent of nature.

 
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Oliver Neu. Sculpture: Pferd (Horse), 2020. Stoneware, porcelain.. 58 x 25 x 47 cm. Photo by: Helge Artikus. 
. Oliver Neu constructs abstract animal sculptures from porcelain fragments or combines stoneware and porcelain in a way that is technically problematic from the outset so that damage in the form of cracks is to be expected. This manufacturing process with its various, uncontrollable influences creates fragile individual pieces. The animal sculptures are characterized by abstraction, clear silhouettes, angular forms, and a multitude of cracks, which make them appear mysterious and fragile. They appear reduced to their essence – an effect which contributes to the pure white colour and the renouncement of colourful accents that could at the same time be associated with a naturalistic appearance.
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.  . Oliver Neu
Sculpture: Pferd (Horse), 2020
Stoneware, porcelain.
58 x 25 x 47 cm
Photo by: Helge Artikus

Oliver Neu constructs abstract animal sculptures from porcelain fragments or combines stoneware and porcelain in a way that is technically problematic from the outset so that damage in the form of cracks is to be expected. This manufacturing process with its various, uncontrollable influences creates fragile individual pieces. The animal sculptures are characterized by abstraction, clear silhouettes, angular forms, and a multitude of cracks, which make them appear mysterious and fragile. They appear reduced to their essence – an effect which contributes to the pure white colour and the renouncement of colourful accents that could at the same time be associated with a naturalistic appearance.

 
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Annie Parnell. Object: Leaning Monument, 2018. Stoneware, porcelain.. 14 x 3 x 3 cm. Photo by: Andrew Sikorski. 
. Annie Parnell's small-format works consist of constructions of fine strands, rods, or bands, preferably on plinths, over which glaze is poured, which trickles down in thick drops, gets caught in the openings and furrows and runs into them, accumulates on the base in large puddles of glaze. By pausing the state of flow and by the impression of the fluentness caught in a moment, her works convey at the same time dynamism and calm. It is her concern to experiment with new techniques and forms of construction. She would like to set herself apart from traditional ceramics with their characteristics of virtuosity and controlled results in order to allow more space for chance and to use this to achieve unusual works. In this way, she spontaneously and unplanned applies thick layers of glaze to fine, delicate shapes, which leads to interactions under heat. This in turn hinders or promotes the flow of the ceramic material or distorts the shapes. After firing, the flow of the glaze is stopped and retained in the shape it achieved by chance. Annie Parnell relates her ceramic experiments to feminist theory. The ceramic process thus also becomes a feminist questioning of patriarchal traditions in ceramics.
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.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Annie Parnell
Object: Leaning Monument, 2018
Stoneware, porcelain.
14 x 3 x 3 cm
Photo by: Andrew Sikorski

Annie Parnell's small-format works consist of constructions of fine strands, rods, or bands, preferably on plinths, over which glaze is poured, which trickles down in thick drops, gets caught in the openings and furrows and runs into them, accumulates on the base in large puddles of glaze. By pausing the state of flow and by the impression of the fluentness caught in a moment, her works convey at the same time dynamism and calm. It is her concern to experiment with new techniques and forms of construction. She would like to set herself apart from traditional ceramics with their characteristics of virtuosity and controlled results in order to allow more space for chance and to use this to achieve unusual works. In this way, she spontaneously and unplanned applies thick layers of glaze to fine, delicate shapes, which leads to interactions under heat. This in turn hinders or promotes the flow of the ceramic material or distorts the shapes. After firing, the flow of the glaze is stopped and retained in the shape it achieved by chance. Annie Parnell relates her ceramic experiments to feminist theory. The ceramic process thus also becomes a feminist questioning of patriarchal traditions in ceramics.

 
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Nonna Postolenko. Object: What if?, 2020. Porcelain.. 150 x 60 x 20 cm. 
. In her work, Nonna Postolenko deals with the visualization of the past, present, and above all the future. In view of the ubiquitous current uncertainty, it was her concern to reflect on her life in order to gain a clear, concise picture, to consider what has happened and what could still happen. She divided her thoughts into different groups such as art, family, past, present, and future. She differentiates between what her life might be like if she stayed in Russia or the Czech Republic. She uses Russian and Czech folk painting as a stylistic model, which is intended to ease orientation and reading for the viewer. Nonna Postlenko’s work serves as a medium to reflect on her possible respective future in the two countries. She embraces this with humour and irony. The work takes up current topics such as Covid-19, but also general topics such as dealing with one's own self-centeredness. With individual figures, a few props, and painting, Nonna Postolenko creates small scenes that live entirely from gestures and postures, which help to decipher the scenes.
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.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Nonna Postolenko
Object: What if?, 2020
Porcelain.
150 x 60 x 20 cm

In her work, Nonna Postolenko deals with the visualization of the past, present, and above all the future. In view of the ubiquitous current uncertainty, it was her concern to reflect on her life in order to gain a clear, concise picture, to consider what has happened and what could still happen. She divided her thoughts into different groups such as art, family, past, present, and future. She differentiates between what her life might be like if she stayed in Russia or the Czech Republic. She uses Russian and Czech folk painting as a stylistic model, which is intended to ease orientation and reading for the viewer. Nonna Postlenko’s work serves as a medium to reflect on her possible respective future in the two countries. She embraces this with humour and irony. The work takes up current topics such as Covid-19, but also general topics such as dealing with one's own self-centeredness. With individual figures, a few props, and painting, Nonna Postolenko creates small scenes that live entirely from gestures and postures, which help to decipher the scenes.

 
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Luisa Pratsch. Vase: Phase: Chaos, 2020. Stoneware.. 73 x 30 x 13 cm. Photo by: Luisa Pratsch. 
. Luisa Pratsch's subject is a metamorphosis in movement and dance. In each of her works, she depicts an abstract dance sequence. This begins with calm, swinging figures, then turns into powerful, precise movements with linear changes of direction, transforms into chaotic ecstasy, and finally culminates in a playful detachment and into meditative silence. Luisa Pratsch compares the human body with the form of the vessel. The intensities and directions of movement determine the shape of the vessel. In addition, she takes up her theme in black brush painting on the works, in which the forms of stylized dancing figures can be recognized in varying degrees of distinctness. Some forms can be identified as dancers, others look more like abstract lines. The brushwork and speed of the paint application also correspond to the respective dance phase. So the brush handling can be slow and careful or rather wild and seemingly unplanned. The reference to form and painting/decoration supplies the work with a particularly coherent and harmonious overall impression.
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.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Luisa Pratsch
Vase: Phase: Chaos, 2020
Stoneware.
73 x 30 x 13 cm
Photo by: Luisa Pratsch

Luisa Pratsch's subject is a metamorphosis in movement and dance. In each of her works, she depicts an abstract dance sequence. This begins with calm, swinging figures, then turns into powerful, precise movements with linear changes of direction, transforms into chaotic ecstasy, and finally culminates in a playful detachment and into meditative silence. Luisa Pratsch compares the human body with the form of the vessel. The intensities and directions of movement determine the shape of the vessel. In addition, she takes up her theme in black brush painting on the works, in which the forms of stylized dancing figures can be recognized in varying degrees of distinctness. Some forms can be identified as dancers, others look more like abstract lines. The brushwork and speed of the paint application also correspond to the respective dance phase. So the brush handling can be slow and careful or rather wild and seemingly unplanned. The reference to form and painting/decoration supplies the work with a particularly coherent and harmonious overall impression.

 
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Mus Ruijg. Installation: Stil Even, 2020. Textile, ceramics, furniture.. 250 x 300 x 300 cm. Photo by: Jelle Raap. 
. With her work, Mus Ruijg tries to draw attention to the everyday things in our environment, as she fears that the wealth of available objects threatens that the value of simple objects will be overlooked. She tries to counteract this by animating these simple things. Through her project, everyday objects should be experienced anew. The project changes their context, gives them a new purpose with the intent to allow a fresh look at them and thus to surprise. The subject of “Stil even” is the value of craft, the beauty of handicraft, and the emotional attachment to objects. Mus Ruijg invites us to take an unhurried look at the beautiful things with which people surround themselves. In “Stil even” she employs the moment of surprise and alienation by playfully using textile – in the form of a striped shirt. The shirt serves as a tablecloth and vessels seem to develop from it; the sleeves of the shirt become the legs of an already delicate chair. In general, the fragility of the installation makes it clear that these are not objects for daily use, but rather symbolic objects, the aim of which is content-related. In terms of her own position, it is important to Mus Ruijg not to commit to any genre, but rather to move between the different areas. This gives her freedom and the space to discover new things.
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.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Mus Ruijg
Installation: Stil Even, 2020
Textile, ceramics, furniture.
250 x 300 x 300 cm
Photo by: Jelle Raap

With her work, Mus Ruijg tries to draw attention to the everyday things in our environment, as she fears that the wealth of available objects threatens that the value of simple objects will be overlooked. She tries to counteract this by animating these simple things. Through her project, everyday objects should be experienced anew. The project changes their context, gives them a new purpose with the intent to allow a fresh look at them and thus to surprise. The subject of “Stil even” is the value of craft, the beauty of handicraft, and the emotional attachment to objects. Mus Ruijg invites us to take an unhurried look at the beautiful things with which people surround themselves. In “Stil even” she employs the moment of surprise and alienation by playfully using textile – in the form of a striped shirt. The shirt serves as a tablecloth and vessels seem to develop from it; the sleeves of the shirt become the legs of an already delicate chair. In general, the fragility of the installation makes it clear that these are not objects for daily use, but rather symbolic objects, the aim of which is content-related. In terms of her own position, it is important to Mus Ruijg not to commit to any genre, but rather to move between the different areas. This gives her freedom and the space to discover new things.

 
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Nadj Kim Schlenker. Vase: Cityscape vases, 2020. Ceramics.. 86 x 27 x 25 cm. Photo by: Nadj Kim Schlenker. 
. In her work, Nadja Schlenker refers to Italo Calvino's equation of the city with a dream that is composed of wishes and fear, a place where everything is mysterious and deceptive. She herself sees the city as a collage, to which new things are constantly being added and something is frequently changing. This struck her especially in Beirut, a city with a long history, full of pulsating life and in constant growth. However, this city is mostly perceived as being shaped by unrest and war. Nadja Schlenker uses vases and furniture objects to create an imaginary city that is inspired by the architecture, the sea, and the colours of Beirut, as well as by personal memories. Nadja Schlenker sees her work as an “an ode to the city whose beauty lies in the hidden layers, […] Personal associations are woven into the experience as the first impression slowly changes.” She transforms objects by cutting, mixing, collaging, and putting them together to put them in a new context, to allow a new perspective. Individual details are highlighted in an irritating way, materials alienated. The vases have a dance-like, elongated appearance, the furniture is reminiscent of stones overgrown with moss.
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.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Nadj Kim Schlenker
Vase: Cityscape vases, 2020
Ceramics.
86 x 27 x 25 cm
Photo by: Nadj Kim Schlenker

In her work, Nadja Schlenker refers to Italo Calvino's equation of the city with a dream that is composed of wishes and fear, a place where everything is mysterious and deceptive. She herself sees the city as a collage, to which new things are constantly being added and something is frequently changing. This struck her especially in Beirut, a city with a long history, full of pulsating life and in constant growth. However, this city is mostly perceived as being shaped by unrest and war. Nadja Schlenker uses vases and furniture objects to create an imaginary city that is inspired by the architecture, the sea, and the colours of Beirut, as well as by personal memories. Nadja Schlenker sees her work as an “an ode to the city whose beauty lies in the hidden layers, […] Personal associations are woven into the experience as the first impression slowly changes.” She transforms objects by cutting, mixing, collaging, and putting them together to put them in a new context, to allow a new perspective. Individual details are highlighted in an irritating way, materials alienated. The vases have a dance-like, elongated appearance, the furniture is reminiscent of stones overgrown with moss.

 
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Zhifeng Song. Wall piece: Rekristallisiert #5, 2019. Old clothes, porcelain slip, fabrics.. 76 x 40 x 5 cm. 
. Song Zhifeng is fascinated by ceramics because of its versatility and mysterious way of solidifying. He is particularly interested in the imperfection, the fragility of ceramics, their transience. He sees it as a sign of the fragility of the world, of its unrest and uncertainty. By this inspired, Song Zhifeng began collecting ceramic pieces of various origins. He understands them as "fragments of lost structure and exposed cracks" and regards them like an archaeological excavation. This explains his approach of rediscovering, redefining and assembling. Works are apparently reconstructed and transformed based on the original properties of the material, and the fragments are combined in the furnace into a new form. Other works are based on unusual techniques: they are built from clay, glazed, made to collapse in the oven with steam, and then fired. This process can be repeated several times. In addition, other materials can be added to the ceramics such as old bricks, cement, wall fragments made of sand and plaster, window glass, dust, old clothing, and metal structures. Song Zhifeng creates from all these materials in the reduction firing at 1280°C “new ceramics” as he defines it. The waste material, which is connected with an abundance of negative associations, is transformed through this process. Song Zhifeng understands his work not only as an act of transformation but also as “reflections on catastrophes”, as “tolerance towards the world”.
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.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Zhifeng Song
Wall piece: Rekristallisiert #5, 2019
Old clothes, porcelain slip, fabrics.
76 x 40 x 5 cm

Song Zhifeng is fascinated by ceramics because of its versatility and mysterious way of solidifying. He is particularly interested in the imperfection, the fragility of ceramics, their transience. He sees it as a sign of the fragility of the world, of its unrest and uncertainty. By this inspired, Song Zhifeng began collecting ceramic pieces of various origins. He understands them as "fragments of lost structure and exposed cracks" and regards them like an archaeological excavation. This explains his approach of rediscovering, redefining and assembling. Works are apparently reconstructed and transformed based on the original properties of the material, and the fragments are combined in the furnace into a new form. Other works are based on unusual techniques: they are built from clay, glazed, made to collapse in the oven with steam, and then fired. This process can be repeated several times. In addition, other materials can be added to the ceramics such as old bricks, cement, wall fragments made of sand and plaster, window glass, dust, old clothing, and metal structures. Song Zhifeng creates from all these materials in the reduction firing at 1280°C “new ceramics” as he defines it. The waste material, which is connected with an abundance of negative associations, is transformed through this process. Song Zhifeng understands his work not only as an act of transformation but also as “reflections on catastrophes”, as “tolerance towards the world”.

 
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Theresa Voigt. Vessel: The modular mold. As a tool for user-centered design, 2020. Porcelain.. 20 x 14 x 14 cm. Photo by: Theresa Voigt. 
. Theresa Voigt deals in her work with industrial production and the associated loss of appreciation for the products. She attributes this to the lack of knowledge about the genesis and production processes, to the anonymization of the objects. It is her concern to draw attention to the people involved in the production process as well as to involve the users in the design process. This should lead to a more intensified interest in the products. The project is based on the idea that the prospective users can put together their own porcelain objects via a website by designing, moving elements, and putting them together in different ways based on previously defined parameters. In the further course, the users are informed about the production and all those involved. By dividing the shape into different plaster segments, it is easily possible to put together different products. This process creates visually similar objects, each of which differs in details and thus forms a unique piece. The vessels consist of conical and cylindrical shapes, the colours tend to be pastel and matte. The cast seams remain visible and emphasize the motif of displacement.
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.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Theresa Voigt
Vessel: The modular mold. As a tool for user-centered design, 2020
Porcelain.
20 x 14 x 14 cm
Photo by: Theresa Voigt

Theresa Voigt deals in her work with industrial production and the associated loss of appreciation for the products. She attributes this to the lack of knowledge about the genesis and production processes, to the anonymization of the objects. It is her concern to draw attention to the people involved in the production process as well as to involve the users in the design process. This should lead to a more intensified interest in the products. The project is based on the idea that the prospective users can put together their own porcelain objects via a website by designing, moving elements, and putting them together in different ways based on previously defined parameters. In the further course, the users are informed about the production and all those involved. By dividing the shape into different plaster segments, it is easily possible to put together different products. This process creates visually similar objects, each of which differs in details and thus forms a unique piece. The vessels consist of conical and cylindrical shapes, the colours tend to be pastel and matte. The cast seams remain visible and emphasize the motif of displacement.
 
 
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HeeSong Yoo. Vase: Untitled, 2019. White porcelain, coloured glaze.. 16 x 10.5 x 20.5 cm. Photo by: HeeSong Yoo. 
. HeeSong Yoo first designs for her vessels a series of distinctive individual shapes, which she then combines and puts together in different ways. She plays with the forms and experiments with the possibilities of composition, looks for dynamic silhouettes and reflects about how she can overcome the limitations of the turning technique. It is her concern to produce beautiful objects that fit into the lives of the users and bring joy. She defines a successful ceramic object as "having a unique figure, displaying its beauty without being too overwhelming, and blending naturally with its ambience". Her vase objects consist of laterally flattened circular and cylindrical shapes on which other small forms with openings are placed. These smaller elements are disc-shaped, conical, cylindrical, and fluted. This combination creates unusual and very distinctive vase objects.
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.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
. 
.  . HeeSong Yoo
Vase: Untitled, 2019
White porcelain, coloured glaze.
16 x 10.5 x 20.5 cm
Photo by: HeeSong Yoo

HeeSong Yoo first designs for her vessels a series of distinctive individual shapes, which she then combines and puts together in different ways. She plays with the forms and experiments with the possibilities of composition, looks for dynamic silhouettes and reflects about how she can overcome the limitations of the turning technique. It is her concern to produce beautiful objects that fit into the lives of the users and bring joy. She defines a successful ceramic object as "having a unique figure, displaying its beauty without being too overwhelming, and blending naturally with its ambience". Her vase objects consist of laterally flattened circular and cylindrical shapes on which other small forms with openings are placed. These smaller elements are disc-shaped, conical, cylindrical, and fluted. This combination creates unusual and very distinctive vase objects.

 
 

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Jakob Eichner. Model: Model of a modular cloakroom system, 2020. Veneer plywood, aluminum.. 51 x 80 x 52 cm. Photo by: Jakob Eichner. 
. Jakob Eichner's modular cloakroom system was created with the aim of designing a cloakroom that can be individually adapted and expanded at any time. Various corpora and elements can be freely placed on a support wall with horizontal slots using a specially developed "hook mechanism". The design of the support wall was based on ergonomic and visual aspects and is based on a specially developed system of proportions. Jakob Eichner invented various components for this cloakroom project that work with the same mechanism, but have a different function within the cloakroom: single hooks, support wall connectors, wall mountings, clothes hooks. He thus presents the breadth of variation with regard to the possible uses of the tension hook mechanism. Johann Eichner uses the example of a corpus element to describe how his specially designed brackets work: “To hang a corpus in, you lift it in the right position, turn the hooks with the wedges pulled out across and push them into the slots. Then push in the hooks and turn them so that the wedges point towards the wall. The wedge must be in a horizontal position to slide into a recess in the sidewall. This recess serves to prevent the mechanism from twisting and is replaced by two studs concerning elements without a wall. Now push in the wedges with your thumb while holding the hook with your index finger. To loosen the wedge again, turn it up and down slightly until it has loosened and you can pull it out."
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.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Jakob Eichner
Model: Model of a modular cloakroom system, 2020
Veneer plywood, aluminum.
51 x 80 x 52 cm
Photo by: Jakob Eichner

Jakob Eichner's modular cloakroom system was created with the aim of designing a cloakroom that can be individually adapted and expanded at any time. Various corpora and elements can be freely placed on a support wall with horizontal slots using a specially developed "hook mechanism". The design of the support wall was based on ergonomic and visual aspects and is based on a specially developed system of proportions. Jakob Eichner invented various components for this cloakroom project that work with the same mechanism, but have a different function within the cloakroom: single hooks, support wall connectors, wall mountings, clothes hooks. He thus presents the breadth of variation with regard to the possible uses of the tension hook mechanism. Johann Eichner uses the example of a corpus element to describe how his specially designed brackets work: “To hang a corpus in, you lift it in the right position, turn the hooks with the wedges pulled out across and push them into the slots. Then push in the hooks and turn them so that the wedges point towards the wall. The wedge must be in a horizontal position to slide into a recess in the sidewall. This recess serves to prevent the mechanism from twisting and is replaced by two studs concerning elements without a wall. Now push in the wedges with your thumb while holding the hook with your index finger. To loosen the wedge again, turn it up and down slightly until it has loosened and you can pull it out."

 
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Jakob Frank. Instrument: Canna Leaf, 2020. Hempstone (100% hemp fiber), walnut, bird's eyes maple, Sonowood (walnut), Sonowood (bird's eyes maple).. 110 x 39 x 19 cm. Photo by: Jakob Frank. 
. The "Canna Leaf" guitar is based on the material innovation "hempstone", a patented natural fibre material consisting only of hemp and water, which is suitable for the production of rounded, three-dimensional shapes and was used for the body of the guitar. Design and construction of the guitar have been completely redesigned in order to do justice to the special body material, to achieve a special sound and a pleasant playing experience. One of the concerns was to provide musicians with inspiration and stimulation to break away from conventions and present new approaches. The hempstone body is stabilized against deformation by the solid frame. It offers a support surface for the neck, with the rounded edge making the guitar more pleasant to play and improving the sound by keeping the vibration energy in the top. The sound hole on the cutaway increases the active vibration surface of the guitar. The sound hole on the side allows the player to hear himself better. The pin-less bridge is easier to string and creates a more direct pull on the top. The arrangement of the mechanics on the guitar head makes tuning the guitar easier. The top is form-glued in three layers to counteract the string tension and to reduce the weight of the top. The so-called falcat bracing allows the top to vibrate more easily and increases the bass resonance.
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.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Jakob Frank
Instrument: Canna Leaf, 2020
Hempstone (100% hemp fiber), walnut, bird's eyes maple, Sonowood (walnut), Sonowood (bird's eyes maple).
110 x 39 x 19 cm
Photo by: Jakob Frank

The "Canna Leaf" guitar is based on the material innovation "hempstone", a patented natural fibre material consisting only of hemp and water, which is suitable for the production of rounded, three-dimensional shapes and was used for the body of the guitar. Design and construction of the guitar have been completely redesigned in order to do justice to the special body material, to achieve a special sound and a pleasant playing experience. One of the concerns was to provide musicians with inspiration and stimulation to break away from conventions and present new approaches. The hempstone body is stabilized against deformation by the solid frame. It offers a support surface for the neck, with the rounded edge making the guitar more pleasant to play and improving the sound by keeping the vibration energy in the top. The sound hole on the cutaway increases the active vibration surface of the guitar. The sound hole on the side allows the player to hear himself better. The pin-less bridge is easier to string and creates a more direct pull on the top. The arrangement of the mechanics on the guitar head makes tuning the guitar easier. The top is form-glued in three layers to counteract the string tension and to reduce the weight of the top. The so-called falcat bracing allows the top to vibrate more easily and increases the bass resonance.

 
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Sara Howard. Vessel: Circular Ceramics, 2020. Industrial waste.. Photo by: Sara Howard. 
. "Circular Ceramics" is a series of vessels created from the by-products of industrial waste. With recourse to the principles of the circular economy, "Circular Ceramics" forms an industrial symbiosis within the ceramic industry: The waste by-product of a ceramic manufacturer serves as raw material for the ceramic production of the series. Many of the raw materials currently used to make ceramics are expected to run out over the next 20 years based on current consumption rates and a number of known resources. Alone the United Kingdom produced 10 million tons of industrial waste in 2018, which contained many of the finite, increasingly scarce raw materials that are becoming gradually expensive. The aim of “Circular Ceramics” is to minimize the consumption of these finite raw materials through the recovery of industrial waste and to secure a future for the ceramic industry and the earth. The individual items of the series are traditionally functional and designed for everyday use. They have a natural colour and surface impression that can change and vary depending on the components.
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.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Sara Howard
Vessel: Circular Ceramics, 2020
Industrial waste.
Photo by: Sara Howard

"Circular Ceramics" is a series of vessels created from the by-products of industrial waste. With recourse to the principles of the circular economy, "Circular Ceramics" forms an industrial symbiosis within the ceramic industry: The waste by-product of a ceramic manufacturer serves as raw material for the ceramic production of the series. Many of the raw materials currently used to make ceramics are expected to run out over the next 20 years based on current consumption rates and a number of known resources. Alone the United Kingdom produced 10 million tons of industrial waste in 2018, which contained many of the finite, increasingly scarce raw materials that are becoming gradually expensive. The aim of “Circular Ceramics” is to minimize the consumption of these finite raw materials through the recovery of industrial waste and to secure a future for the ceramic industry and the earth. The individual items of the series are traditionally functional and designed for everyday use. They have a natural colour and surface impression that can change and vary depending on the components.

 
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Amelie Graf. Bag: Meal Bag (Prototype), 2020. Specially developed edible bioplastic.. 150 x 90 x 50 cm. Photo by: Amelie Graf. 
. The "Meal Bag" is an edible food packaging that is based on the raw materials of paper. The packaging also serves as part of a meal with ingredients such as cellulose and starch, which are fiber and energy suppliers ' important building blocks for growth. Since the substances are not modified, the nutrients are retained in the material. The packaging can be used as a base for sauces or dips when cooking, or it can be added to daily wet dog food. Alternatively, the packaging can be returned via the home compost or the organic waste bin and will weather within a short time. The first use is in supermarkets, organic markets, and above all unpackaged shops to pack and dose food “unpacked”. The goods are delivered in large, airtight deposit containers, which are also used for display in the shop. The goods are removed from it with pliers. Customers can decide how the packaging should be recycled. It is important to Amelie Graf that the nutrients circulate in the material and that the natural cycles of the evolution and decay of nature are supported.
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.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Amelie Graf
Bag: Meal Bag (Prototype), 2020
Specially developed edible bioplastic.
150 x 90 x 50 cm
Photo by: Amelie Graf

The "Meal Bag" is an edible food packaging that is based on the raw materials of paper. The packaging also serves as part of a meal with ingredients such as cellulose and starch, which are fiber and energy suppliers ' important building blocks for growth. Since the substances are not modified, the nutrients are retained in the material. The packaging can be used as a base for sauces or dips when cooking, or it can be added to daily wet dog food. Alternatively, the packaging can be returned via the home compost or the organic waste bin and will weather within a short time. The first use is in supermarkets, organic markets, and above all unpackaged shops to pack and dose food “unpacked”. The goods are delivered in large, airtight deposit containers, which are also used for display in the shop. The goods are removed from it with pliers. Customers can decide how the packaging should be recycled. It is important to Amelie Graf that the nutrients circulate in the material and that the natural cycles of the evolution and decay of nature are supported.

 
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Melis Kiran. Textile: Yeni Deri, 2019. Warp: organic warp linen, weft: yarn from recycled leather.. 110 x 60 cm. Photo by: Melis Kiran. 
. Melis Kiran's project “yeni deri” (Turkish: new leather) deals with the various possibilities of converting discarded leather clothing into new materials. Due to the rapid change of fashion, leather products are also becoming quickly unfashionable and disposed of. Leather, a rather luxurious natural material that was designed for long-term wear, has now become a mass product. The UN agricultural organization FAO assumes an annual production of 1.8 billion square meters of leather. In Melis Kiran’s project, the disposable leather clothing is processed into new surfaces using various techniques. Depending on the raw material available, two different processes are used: Larger cut pieces are cut into leather strips and then woven; smaller cuttings, on the other hand, form the basic material for a kind of powder that, mixed with biopolymers and glycerine, can be poured into flat parts. This leather bioplastic can have different surface structures and properties depending on the mixing ratio of the respective substances.
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.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Melis Kiran
Textile: Yeni Deri, 2019
Warp: organic warp linen, weft: yarn from recycled leather.
110 x 60 cm
Photo by: Melis Kiran

Melis Kiran's project “yeni deri” (Turkish: new leather) deals with the various possibilities of converting discarded leather clothing into new materials. Due to the rapid change of fashion, leather products are also becoming quickly unfashionable and disposed of. Leather, a rather luxurious natural material that was designed for long-term wear, has now become a mass product. The UN agricultural organization FAO assumes an annual production of 1.8 billion square meters of leather. In Melis Kiran’s project, the disposable leather clothing is processed into new surfaces using various techniques. Depending on the raw material available, two different processes are used: Larger cut pieces are cut into leather strips and then woven; smaller cuttings, on the other hand, form the basic material for a kind of powder that, mixed with biopolymers and glycerine, can be poured into flat parts. This leather bioplastic can have different surface structures and properties depending on the mixing ratio of the respective substances.

 
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