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30 Selected Artists at LOEWE FOUNDATION Craft Prize 2024

Article  /  Artists   Curating   Exhibiting   Collecting
Published: 05.03.2024
Author:
Loewe Foundation
Edited by:
Klimt02
Edited at:
Barcelona
Edited on:
2024
Debaroun (Dahyeon Yoo). Object: Harmony, 2023. Vegetable tanned leather. 25 x 13 x 13 cm. Straw weaving and plaiting techniques from the Korean Joseon Dynasty have been reinterpreted in leather to create this poised box that contrasts rough and smooth in a complex interplay of textures. Supple vegetable-tanned leather has been soaked, and twisted to create multiple strands, then delicately woven to form an intricate base and lid with a timeless quality. The work emphasizes the importance of harmony and embodies an attitude seeking inner balance and centering in a rapidly changing world. While each individual strand is fragile, when woven together they become strong and resilient. Wrinkles and unevenness in texture, usually viewed as flaws, are instead celebrated as a testament to the natural origins of the leather.. Debaroun (Dahyeon Yoo)
Object: Harmony, 2023
Vegetable tanned leather
25 x 13 x 13 cm
Straw weaving and plaiting techniques from the Korean Joseon Dynasty have been reinterpreted in leather to create this poised box that contrasts rough and smooth in a complex interplay of textures. Supple vegetable-tanned leather has been soaked, and twisted to create multiple strands, then delicately woven to form an intricate base and lid with a timeless quality. The work emphasizes the importance of harmony and embodies an attitude seeking inner balance and centering in a rapidly changing world. While each individual strand is fragile, when woven together they become strong and resilient. Wrinkles and unevenness in texture, usually viewed as flaws, are instead celebrated as a testament to the natural origins of the leather.
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.

Intro
LOEWE FOUNDATION announces the 30 artists shortlisted for the 2024 edition of the LOEWE FOUNDATION Craft Prize. The finalists’ works will be exhibited at Palais de Tokyo in Paris from 15 May until 9 June 2024.

The works selected for the LOEWE FOUNDATION Craft Prize shortlist will go on display at Palais de Tokyo in Paris from 15 May to 9 June 2024. Many of the works repurpose found or recycled materials and there is a focus on the elevation and transformation of the every day, such as rubber tyres and compressed wood, which are not traditionally associated with craft. A combination of skill and mastery of technique, guided by intuition and chance, has been utilised in the creation of several works on this year’s shortlist and many feature organic, biomorphic forms that push materials to their physical limits to present new configurations and unique shapes not seen before.
 
This year’s finalists were chosen by a panel of experts from over 3,900 submissions by artisans representing 124 countries and regions. The finalists, representing 16 countries and regions, work across a range of mediums including ceramics, woodwork, textiles, furniture, paper, basketry, glass, metal, jewellery, lacquer and leather. In their deliberations, the panel sought to identify the most outstanding works in terms of technical accomplishment, skills, innovation and artistic vision.

A tribute to LOEWE’s beginnings as a collective craft workshop in 1846, the annual Craft Prize was launched by the LOEWE FOUNDATION in 2016 to celebrate excellence, artistic merit and innovation in modern craftsmanship. The award, envisioned by LOEWE creative director Jonathan Anderson, aims to acknowledge the importance of craft in today’s culture and to recognise artists whose talent, vision and will to innovate, promise to set a new standard for the future.

Works by the 30 finalists will go on display at Palais de Tokyo in Paris, Europe’s largest contemporary art centre, and will be documented in an exhibition catalogue. Previous iterations of the prize have been exhibited at Colegio Oficial de Arquitectos de Madrid (COAM), Madrid (2017); The Design Museum, London (2018); Isamu Noguchi’s indoor stone garden ‘Heaven’ at the Sogetsu Kaikan, Tokyo (2019); digitally in a joint presentation with Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Paris (2021); Seoul Museum of Craft Art (SeMoCA), Seoul (2022) and in Isamu Noguchi’s studio at the Noguchi Museum, New York (2023).

Jonathan Anderson stated at the award’s inception: Craft is the essence of LOEWE. As a house, we are about craft in the purest sense of the word. That is where our modernity lies and it will always be relevant.

Regarding the selection process, Anatxu Zabalbeascoa, Executive Secretary of the LOEWE FOUNDATION Craft Prize Expert Panel, said: With the seventh edition of the LOEWE FOUNDATION Craft Prize, we continue to push the boundaries of craft and expand its horizons, with a showcase that includes works created from recycled materials, as various as glass, copper, wire and silicone, by artists around the globe. Our inspiration stems from a celebration of everyday monumentality, that paradoxically challenges the distinction between art and craft. Craft, to us, embodies creativity, meaning, culture, and technique and we believe that traditions are best preserved when they are questioned and reimagined.

A jury composed of 12 leading figures from the world of design, architecture, journalism, criticism, and museum curatorship will select the winner of the 2024 LOEWE FOUNDATION Craft Prize. The winner will be awarded €50,000 and the announcement will be made on 14 May 2024, at the opening of the exhibition at Palais de Tokyo.


The selected finalists for the LOEWE FOUNDATION Craft Prize 2024 are:
Andrés Anza (Mexico), Miki Asai (Japan), Patrick Bongoy (Democratic Republic of the Congo), emmanuel boos (France), Chun Tai Chen (Taiwan Region), Eunmi Chun (Republic of Korea), Ange Dakouo (Mali), Ken Eastman (United Kingdom), Jeremy Frey (United States), Karl Fritsch (New Zealand), Kevin Grey (United Kingdom), Raven Halfmoon (United States), Yuefeng He (Mainland China), Ferne Jacobs (United States), Racso Jugarap (Philippines), Hiroshi Kaneyasu (Japan), Heechan Kim (Republic of Korea), Kira Kim (Republic of Korea), Alison Croney Moses (United States), Gaku Nakane (Japan), Aya Oki (United States), Ozioma Onuzulike (Nigeria), Weon Rhee (Jongwon Lee) (Republic of Korea), Ikuya Sagara (Japan), Luis Santos Montes (Spain), Saar Scheerlings (Netherlands), Polly Adams Sutton (United States), Kazuhiro Toyama (Japan), Norman Weber (Germany), Debaroun (Dahyeon Yoo) (Republic of Korea).

The 2024 Experts Panel that selected the 30 finalists is composed of:
- Andrew Bonacina, LOEWE Art Consultant and independent curator.
- Antonia Boström, Former Director of Collections at the Victoria & Albert Museum, London.
- Hyeyoung  Cho,  Chairwoman at the Korea  Association of Art and Design.
- Keeryong Choi, Glass artist and LOEWE FOUNDATION Craft Prize 2023 Finalist.
- Andile Dyalvane, Ceramist and LOEWE FOUNDATION Craft Prize 2022 Finalist.
- Sara Flynn, Ceramicist and LOEWE FOUNDATION Craft Prize 2017 Finalist.
- Kaori Juzu, Metal artist and LOEWE FOUNDATION Craft Prize 2023 Finalist.
- Wolfgang Lösche, Former Head of Exhibitions and Fairs at the Chamber of Skilled Trades, Munich.
- Juha Marttila, LOEWE Leather Goods Design Director.
- Mary Savig, Curator of Craft at the Smithsonian American Art Museum Renwick Gallery,  Washington DC.
- Anatxu Zabalbeascoa (Executive Secretary), architecture and design correspondent for El País.

The 2024 Jury that will select the winner of the 2024 Craft Prize is composed of:
- Abraham Thomas, Curator of Modern Architecture, Design and Decorative Arts at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.
- Anatxu Zabalbeascoa, Architecture and design correspondent for El País.
- Deyan Sudjic, Essayist and Director Emeritus of the Design Museum,  London.
- Eriko Inazaki, Ceramicist and the LOEWE FOUNDATION Craft Prize 2023 winner.
- Jonathan Anderson, LOEWE Creative Director.
- Magdalene  Odundo, Ceramicist.
- Minsuk Cho, Architect and Golden Lion at The Venice Architecture Biennale 2014.
- Naoto Fukasawa, Designer and Director of the Japan Folk Crafts Museum, Tokyo.
- Olivier Gabet, Director of the Art Department at the Louvre Museum, Paris.
- Patricia Urquiola, Architect and industrial designer.
- Sheila Loewe, (Chairwoman) President of the LOEWE FOUNDATION.
- Wang Shu, Architect and Pritzker Prize Winner.

About The LOEWE Foundation
The LOEWE FOUNDATION was established as a private cultural foundation in 1988 by Enrique Loewe, a fourth-generation member of LOEWE’s founding family. Today, under the direction of his daughter Sheila Loewe, the Foundation continues to promote creativity, organise educational programs and protect cultural heritage in the fields of craft, design, photography, poetry and dance. The Foundation was awarded the Gold Medal for Merit in the Fine Arts by the Spanish government in 2002.
 
LOEWE & Culture
With the LOEWE FOUNDATION Craft Prize, the house reasserts its longstanding commitment to creativity in all forms and disciplines. Culture is a pillar of the brand. Reflecting fashion’s vital link to contemporary life, a strong emphasis on art, design and craftsmanship has been a cornerstone of Jonathan Anderson’s rebuilding of the house. Since Anderson’s appointment in 2013, LOEWE has initiated an important series of collaborations with artists and artisans who reinterpret and expand the brand’s values. Apart from showcasing the many facets of LOEWE, these cultural projects reflect the transfer of knowledge and the cooperative spirit that has been characteristic of LOEWE since the day it was founded.
 
Andrés Anza. Object: I only know what I have seen, 2023. Ceramic, acrylic paint. 45 x 40 x 150 cm. This life-sized totemic ceramic conjures both plant and animal forms. Assembled in five parts, the work is constructed from refractory clay and features a dynamic composition that appears to twist, turn, and fold in on itself. Thousands of tiny, spiked protrusions covering the work’s surface lend it a further amorphic quality. After the work was fired in a kiln to give an even surface, acrylic paint was applied. This monochromatic finish allows light and shadow to further emphasize the work’s highly textured surface.. Andrés Anza
Object: I only know what I have seen, 2023
Ceramic, acrylic paint
45 x 40 x 150 cm
This life-sized totemic ceramic conjures both plant and animal forms. Assembled in five parts, the work is constructed from refractory clay and features a dynamic composition that appears to twist, turn, and fold in on itself. Thousands of tiny, spiked protrusions covering the work’s surface lend it a further amorphic quality. After the work was fired in a kiln to give an even surface, acrylic paint was applied. This monochromatic finish allows light and shadow to further emphasize the work’s highly textured surface.
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
emmanuel boos. Furniture: Comme un lego (Coffee table), 2023. Porcelain, tenmoku black and wood. 67 x 176 x 38 cm. Functionality combines with fragility in this coffee table crafted from 98 hollow bricks. Held in place without the use of glue, each brick can be individually lifted from the structure. A sense of playfulness is contrasted with the deep and muted color palette of the bricks, which have been slip-cast from porcelain and fired with a Tenmoku glaze. Plaster molds were used to cast each brick, punched with two holes so that they can be held in place with dowels. The tabletop sits on five sturdier bricks which are also built from porcelain, but using the slab method with an inner wall for strength.. emmanuel boos
Furniture: Comme un lego (Coffee table), 2023
Porcelain, tenmoku black and wood
67 x 176 x 38 cm
Functionality combines with fragility in this coffee table crafted from 98 hollow bricks. Held in place without the use of glue, each brick can be individually lifted from the structure. A sense of playfulness is contrasted with the deep and muted color palette of the bricks, which have been slip-cast from porcelain and fired with a Tenmoku glaze. Plaster molds were used to cast each brick, punched with two holes so that they can be held in place with dowels. The tabletop sits on five sturdier bricks which are also built from porcelain, but using the slab method with an inner wall for strength.
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Eunmi Chun. Necklace: Wings of the Blue Bird, 2019. Cow’s small intestine, thread and ink. 32 x 61 x 3.5 cm. This feather-shaped necklace is made using an innovative technique unique to the artist. The work
. is constructed entirely from the small intestines of cows. After being dried and dyed in shades of blue on wooden boards to transform them into a parchment-like material, the intestines are cut to resemble plumage, before being carefully sewn together to create the necklace. The work explores notions of masquerading projecting, and presenting an assumed identity to the world.. Eunmi Chun
Necklace: Wings of the Blue Bird, 2019
Cow’s small intestine, thread and ink
32 x 61 x 3.5 cm
This feather-shaped necklace is made using an innovative technique unique to the artist. The work
is constructed entirely from the small intestines of cows. After being dried and dyed in shades of blue on wooden boards to transform them into a parchment-like material, the intestines are cut to resemble plumage, before being carefully sewn together to create the necklace. The work explores notions of masquerading projecting, and presenting an assumed identity to the world.
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Chun Tai Chen. Object: In Simplicty, 2023. Paper, dye, glue, aluminium, stainless steel and brass. Various dimensions. Layer upon layer of thin paper, each indented meticulously with individual serrations, have been compressed together and bound into three blocks to create this series. Tiny notches were carved into each layer, and dye carefully applied, before each block was repeatedly ground to reveal a gentle gradation across its surface, evoking the striation of rock that acts as a marker of the passage of time. The repetitive and meditative process used to create the work pays testament to the concept of humility in Eastern philosophy.. Chun Tai Chen
Object: In Simplicty, 2023
Paper, dye, glue, aluminium, stainless steel and brass
Various dimensions
Layer upon layer of thin paper, each indented meticulously with individual serrations, have been compressed together and bound into three blocks to create this series. Tiny notches were carved into each layer, and dye carefully applied, before each block was repeatedly ground to reveal a gentle gradation across its surface, evoking the striation of rock that acts as a marker of the passage of time. The repetitive and meditative process used to create the work pays testament to the concept of humility in Eastern philosophy.
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Ange Dakouo. Textile: Harmony of Grigris, 2023. Cardboard, newspaper, cotton thread, acrylic and cowrie shell. 163 x 153 x 1 cm. This textile work explores the practice of wearing personal protective amulets, often called gris-gris in West Africa. An array of gris-gris has been created using briquettes made from compressed cardboard. Each briquette is covered with newspaper in homage to the artist’s father who worked as a printer. The gris-gris, all of varying sizes, are assembled using cotton thread to create a lattice-like structure. Combined, they have the appearance of a patchwork tapestry. Shells, some encased in red thread, are also attached to the lattice. The artist stresses a spiritual dimension to the work, which acts as a metaphor for the search for diversity and harmony.. Ange Dakouo
Textile: Harmony of Grigris, 2023
Cardboard, newspaper, cotton thread, acrylic and cowrie shell
163 x 153 x 1 cm
This textile work explores the practice of wearing personal protective amulets, often called gris-gris in West Africa. An array of gris-gris has been created using briquettes made from compressed cardboard. Each briquette is covered with newspaper in homage to the artist’s father who worked as a printer. The gris-gris, all of varying sizes, are assembled using cotton thread to create a lattice-like structure. Combined, they have the appearance of a patchwork tapestry. Shells, some encased in red thread, are also attached to the lattice. The artist stresses a spiritual dimension to the work, which acts as a metaphor for the search for diversity and harmony.
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Ferne Jacobs. Textile: Origins, 2018. Coiled and twined waxed linen thread. 44.5 x 129.5 x 10 cm. Waxed linen thread has been used in three different ways to create this orange textile work with contrasting cream detailing. Coiling is used to build the piece wrap by wrap, twining is employed as a weaving technique and knotting provides structure to the twining. The intricate structure, made entirely by hand through a painstaking process, has an amorphous, fluid form that furls and folds in on itself.. Ferne Jacobs
Textile: Origins, 2018
Coiled and twined waxed linen thread
44.5 x 129.5 x 10 cm
Waxed linen thread has been used in three different ways to create this orange textile work with contrasting cream detailing. Coiling is used to build the piece wrap by wrap, twining is employed as a weaving technique and knotting provides structure to the twining. The intricate structure, made entirely by hand through a painstaking process, has an amorphous, fluid form that furls and folds in on itself.
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Alison Croney Moses. Object: Holly Shell, 2023. Holly wood veneer and glue. 77 x 30 x 37 cm. Created using a combination of woodworking techniques, this work takes the form of a large shell, the shape of which is a subtle nod to the female form. Coopering, an ancient technique used for making barrels, has been used to join bent laminated wood that is constructed from five layers glued together in a vacuum-press system. The work sees the wood pushed to its physical limit and skilfully manipulated to bend against its natural grain. It is finished by sanding and the application of gel varnish to create
. a smooth surface.. Alison Croney Moses
Object: Holly Shell, 2023
Holly wood veneer and glue
77 x 30 x 37 cm
Created using a combination of woodworking techniques, this work takes the form of a large shell, the shape of which is a subtle nod to the female form. Coopering, an ancient technique used for making barrels, has been used to join bent laminated wood that is constructed from five layers glued together in a vacuum-press system. The work sees the wood pushed to its physical limit and skilfully manipulated to bend against its natural grain. It is finished by sanding and the application of gel varnish to create
a smooth surface.
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Gaku Nakane. Vessel: Seed, 2023. Clay. 62 x 61 x 49.5 cm. The ancient technique of coiling has been used to slowly build up this volumetric double-walled vessel. Realized on an impressive scale, the work is both powerful and monumental, yet retains a sense of lightness and poise. White liquid slip was sprayed onto the surface and the vessel was then fired at 1250°C. The slip has a higher shrinkage rate than the bare clay underneath, resulting in cracks during firing. The cracks are later soaked with a black glaze, after which the vessel is fired again to subtly articulate the surface.. Gaku Nakane
Vessel: Seed, 2023
Clay
62 x 61 x 49.5 cm
The ancient technique of coiling has been used to slowly build up this volumetric double-walled vessel. Realized on an impressive scale, the work is both powerful and monumental, yet retains a sense of lightness and poise. White liquid slip was sprayed onto the surface and the vessel was then fired at 1250°C. The slip has a higher shrinkage rate than the bare clay underneath, resulting in cracks during firing. The cracks are later soaked with a black glaze, after which the vessel is fired again to subtly articulate the surface.
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Aya Oki. Object: Bloom IX, 2023. Glass. 38 x 35 x 38 cm. This organically shaped work innovatively combines two very different glass techniques. Beginning with canework, strands of multi-coloured glass have been carefully encased in a large bubble made of clear glass. After the initial casing has been created, using a daring glassblowing technique, additional hot glass is attached to the outer surface and, as each globule expands with air, the work is transformed into a cluster of bubbles. The resulting structure imparts optical intrigue, acting as a lens that distorts the canework strands below to create a swirl of colour.. Aya Oki
Object: Bloom IX, 2023
Glass
38 x 35 x 38 cm
This organically shaped work innovatively combines two very different glass techniques. Beginning with canework, strands of multi-coloured glass have been carefully encased in a large bubble made of clear glass. After the initial casing has been created, using a daring glassblowing technique, additional hot glass is attached to the outer surface and, as each globule expands with air, the work is transformed into a cluster of bubbles. The resulting structure imparts optical intrigue, acting as a lens that distorts the canework strands below to create a swirl of colour.
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Ken Eastman. Vessel: Don’t get around much anymore, 2023. Stoneware clay, slips and oxides. 34 x 36 x 65 Cm. Demonstrating a mastery of clay, this ceramic vessel is a study in composition and balance. Slabs
. of white stoneware clay have been skilfully brought together to create a multi-faceted vessel which represents a unique ceramic language. Each plane seemingly moves in a different direction, an effect that is further enhanced through the application of multiple layers of coloured slips and oxides, creating gradients across the surface. The work has undergone multiple firings and the undulation of the surface, combined with colour and light, are integral to the work.. Ken Eastman
Vessel: Don’t get around much anymore, 2023
Stoneware clay, slips and oxides
34 x 36 x 65 Cm
Demonstrating a mastery of clay, this ceramic vessel is a study in composition and balance. Slabs
of white stoneware clay have been skilfully brought together to create a multi-faceted vessel which represents a unique ceramic language. Each plane seemingly moves in a different direction, an effect that is further enhanced through the application of multiple layers of coloured slips and oxides, creating gradients across the surface. The work has undergone multiple firings and the undulation of the surface, combined with colour and light, are integral to the work.
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Jeremy Frey. Vessel: Symphony in Ash, 2022. Black ash, sweet grass and synthetic dye. 30.5 x 30.5 x 56 cm. This elaborate geometric basket has been realised on an impressive scale and reinterprets ancestral Wabanaki nation weaving techniques to create a unique modern form. Materials native to Maine, including sweet grass and brown ash, have been harvested from the artist’s immediate environment, split into thin strips and then plate-woven into a lidded basket comprising two pieces. Graphic surface patterning has been achieved by colouring some of the strips with dye. The work also features spiked quill projections, created through a complex multi-layered porcupine weaving process.. Jeremy Frey
Vessel: Symphony in Ash, 2022
Black ash, sweet grass and synthetic dye
30.5 x 30.5 x 56 cm
This elaborate geometric basket has been realised on an impressive scale and reinterprets ancestral Wabanaki nation weaving techniques to create a unique modern form. Materials native to Maine, including sweet grass and brown ash, have been harvested from the artist’s immediate environment, split into thin strips and then plate-woven into a lidded basket comprising two pieces. Graphic surface patterning has been achieved by colouring some of the strips with dye. The work also features spiked quill projections, created through a complex multi-layered porcupine weaving process.
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Karl Fritsch. Ring: Pukana, 2020. Silver, gold and synthetic gemstones. Various dimensions. This set of five contemporary rings, crafted in silver and gold, demonstrates an innovative technique that upends the traditional method for setting stones in jewellery. The shape of the rings is modelled using wax which is punctuated with gemstones. After the casting process, these synthetic gemstones, including laboratory-created imitation sapphires and rubies, are reinserted into the holes and fixed in place. The bands feature unexpected spontaneous forms, and in many of the rings the gemstones protrude, moving through, rather than sitting on top of, the rings.. Karl Fritsch
Ring: Pukana, 2020
Silver, gold and synthetic gemstones
Various dimensions
This set of five contemporary rings, crafted in silver and gold, demonstrates an innovative technique that upends the traditional method for setting stones in jewellery. The shape of the rings is modelled using wax which is punctuated with gemstones. After the casting process, these synthetic gemstones, including laboratory-created imitation sapphires and rubies, are reinserted into the holes and fixed in place. The bands feature unexpected spontaneous forms, and in many of the rings the gemstones protrude, moving through, rather than sitting on top of, the rings.
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Kevin Grey. Object: Displaced, 2022. 1.2 mm bronze sheet. 52 x 52 x 17 cm. Bronze sheets have been cut into individual panels which are TIG-welded together to create a hollow circular band with high-relief jagged edges. The technique is inspired by the artist’s background in car manufacturing and design. Created without a preparatory sketch or drawing, the angle of each opposing panel has been decided intuitively, and the resulting undulating edges give the work a sense of constant movement. The jagged edges of the work represent the hostility faced by displaced people around the world and the base only partially touches the surface it is placed on, allowing pockets of light to stream through.. Kevin Grey
Object: Displaced, 2022
1.2 mm bronze sheet
52 x 52 x 17 cm
Bronze sheets have been cut into individual panels which are TIG-welded together to create a hollow circular band with high-relief jagged edges. The technique is inspired by the artist’s background in car manufacturing and design. Created without a preparatory sketch or drawing, the angle of each opposing panel has been decided intuitively, and the resulting undulating edges give the work a sense of constant movement. The jagged edges of the work represent the hostility faced by displaced people around the world and the base only partially touches the surface it is placed on, allowing pockets of light to stream through.
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Hiroshi Kaneyasu. Object: Unformed Outline, 2021. Urushi lacquer, plaster and hemp. 102 x 97 x 8 cm. Plaster has been poured onto a bed of clay and glass, and guided by gravity the liquid plaster has deposited into the contours, creating a convex disc. The hardened plaster surface has then been reinforced with linen cloth and layers of red lacquer spread on top, before being sanded and finished with translucent lacquer. Mottled variations in colour across the surface correspond to the varying depths of the lacquer.. Hiroshi Kaneyasu
Object: Unformed Outline, 2021
Urushi lacquer, plaster and hemp
102 x 97 x 8 cm
Plaster has been poured onto a bed of clay and glass, and guided by gravity the liquid plaster has deposited into the contours, creating a convex disc. The hardened plaster surface has then been reinforced with linen cloth and layers of red lacquer spread on top, before being sanded and finished with translucent lacquer. Mottled variations in colour across the surface correspond to the varying depths of the lacquer.
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Heechan Kim. Vessel: #16, 2023. Ash wood and copper wire. 106.7 x 81.3 x 81.3 cm. This sculptural vessel demonstrates a masterful control of material and is the culmination of the artist’s desire to create a new form. Using traditional wood-bending techniques most often seen in boat-making, thinly planed strips of ash have been soaked in water and manipulated using a hot iron, before being sanded and stitched together with thin copper wire. The evolution of the form is guided by intuition; the result is a unique organic structure with a continuously smooth surface, and channels which flow through to a large central chamber.. Heechan Kim
Vessel: #16, 2023
Ash wood and copper wire
106.7 x 81.3 x 81.3 cm
This sculptural vessel demonstrates a masterful control of material and is the culmination of the artist’s desire to create a new form. Using traditional wood-bending techniques most often seen in boat-making, thinly planed strips of ash have been soaked in water and manipulated using a hot iron, before being sanded and stitched together with thin copper wire. The evolution of the form is guided by intuition; the result is a unique organic structure with a continuously smooth surface, and channels which flow through to a large central chamber.
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Kira Kim. Object: Standing House, 2023. Glass and steel. 38.7 x 14 x 24 cm. Resting on a bed of nails, 40 pieces of glass of different sizes, shapes and colours have been assembled in a house-like structure. Created using technically challenging kiln casting, the glass has been hand-finished with multiple applications of lacquer, altering its opacity and creating a dynamic interplay between light and dark. This unusual surface treatment also makes the glass appear heavy, as though it is a solid imposing mass.. Kira Kim
Object: Standing House, 2023
Glass and steel
38.7 x 14 x 24 cm
Resting on a bed of nails, 40 pieces of glass of different sizes, shapes and colours have been assembled in a house-like structure. Created using technically challenging kiln casting, the glass has been hand-finished with multiple applications of lacquer, altering its opacity and creating a dynamic interplay between light and dark. This unusual surface treatment also makes the glass appear heavy, as though it is a solid imposing mass.
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Ikuya Sagara. Object: Reminiscent Wind, 2023. Rice straw, Japanese pampas grass and wood. 85.5 x 45 x 6 cm. Thatched roofing has been used in architecture for millennia and this work reappropriates the technique for artistic expression. Created by a master thatcher, the work poetically evokes the memory of wind moving across a rice field and blowing away the morning mist. Specially selected rice straw has been thatched onto a wooden board, interspersed with delicate strands of Japanese pampas grass. It is then cut and finished at an angle using large thatching shears, with the slanted perspective adding to its gentle sense of movement.. Ikuya Sagara
Object: Reminiscent Wind, 2023
Rice straw, Japanese pampas grass and wood
85.5 x 45 x 6 cm
Thatched roofing has been used in architecture for millennia and this work reappropriates the technique for artistic expression. Created by a master thatcher, the work poetically evokes the memory of wind moving across a rice field and blowing away the morning mist. Specially selected rice straw has been thatched onto a wooden board, interspersed with delicate strands of Japanese pampas grass. It is then cut and finished at an angle using large thatching shears, with the slanted perspective adding to its gentle sense of movement.
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Luis Santos Montes. Sculpture: Cristalización Orgánica Esmeralda, 2023. Paper, MTC and inks. Variable dimensions. This organic malleable structure is created from kraft paper which has been specially treated with methylcellulose and resins to allow flexibility and resistance, and dyed using inks and acrylic paint. The paper was folded and crumpled to create gradient peaks across its surface that can be stretched and manipulated, metamorphosing the 2D form into volumetric 3D shapes. Incorporating elements of chance and intuition, the shape can be transformed into an infinite number of forms. This work contrasts a simplicity of concept with structural complexity in an exploration of time, movement and transformation.. Luis Santos Montes
Sculpture: Cristalización Orgánica Esmeralda, 2023
Paper, MTC and inks
Variable dimensions
This organic malleable structure is created from kraft paper which has been specially treated with methylcellulose and resins to allow flexibility and resistance, and dyed using inks and acrylic paint. The paper was folded and crumpled to create gradient peaks across its surface that can be stretched and manipulated, metamorphosing the 2D form into volumetric 3D shapes. Incorporating elements of chance and intuition, the shape can be transformed into an infinite number of forms. This work contrasts a simplicity of concept with structural complexity in an exploration of time, movement and transformation.
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Kazuhiro Toyama. Vessel: Biophilia: Celestial Shaped Vessel, 2023. Copper. 70 x 70 x 21 cm. Innovative techniques that disrupt our preconceptions of the properties and behaviors of metal have been used to create this work. The artist has created a new technique based on thermal spraying, an industrial coating process. Melted copper, which in its liquid state is almost uncontrollable, has been sprayed onto a hemisphere-shaped mold. The resulting vessel has a large outer rim and sections have been selectively oxidized using heat. Areas of cracking formed during the cooling process further enhance the form’s planetary likeness and lend a fragile quality that speaks to wider narratives around social and environmental collapse.. Kazuhiro Toyama
Vessel: Biophilia: Celestial Shaped Vessel, 2023
Copper
70 x 70 x 21 cm
Innovative techniques that disrupt our preconceptions of the properties and behaviors of metal have been used to create this work. The artist has created a new technique based on thermal spraying, an industrial coating process. Melted copper, which in its liquid state is almost uncontrollable, has been sprayed onto a hemisphere-shaped mold. The resulting vessel has a large outer rim and sections have been selectively oxidized using heat. Areas of cracking formed during the cooling process further enhance the form’s planetary likeness and lend a fragile quality that speaks to wider narratives around social and environmental collapse.
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Polly Adams Sutton. Vessel: Ebb Tide, 2023. Cedar bark, binder cane and magnet wire. 35.5 x 31 x 43 cm. Created from hand-gathered cedar bark, this asymmetrical sculptural basket explores the interplay between convex and concave. The large-scale basket has been created using thin splints in a time- intensive process, with intuition and precision used to modulate tension throughout the work. Stiff black cane has been randomly interspersed with softer western red cedar to create further contrasts, and the resulting undulating detail running across the surface echoes tidal patterns.. Polly Adams Sutton
Vessel: Ebb Tide, 2023
Cedar bark, binder cane and magnet wire
35.5 x 31 x 43 cm
Created from hand-gathered cedar bark, this asymmetrical sculptural basket explores the interplay between convex and concave. The large-scale basket has been created using thin splints in a time- intensive process, with intuition and precision used to modulate tension throughout the work. Stiff black cane has been randomly interspersed with softer western red cedar to create further contrasts, and the resulting undulating detail running across the surface echoes tidal patterns.
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Miki Asai. Ring: Still Life, 2023. Wood, paper, kashu, eggshell, seashell and mineral pigment. Various dimensions. Taking inspiration from still-life paintings as a metaphor for daily life, miniature vessels form the basis of these three sculptural rings. The body of each vessel is formed from paper, and the surfaces are variously treated with tiny fragments of crushed eggshell, pressed to create the illusion of cracked glazing, and mosaicked with seashell to add iridescence. Layers of mineral pigment are then applied to create variations in colour before the vessels are mounted onto hollowed-out wooden blocks. The surface of the wood is also treated using these materials and techniques. The rings are finished using kashu-urushi, a type of lacquer sourced from cashew trees, sanded to create a smooth finish.. Miki Asai
Ring: Still Life, 2023
Wood, paper, kashu, eggshell, seashell and mineral pigment
Various dimensions
Taking inspiration from still-life paintings as a metaphor for daily life, miniature vessels form the basis of these three sculptural rings. The body of each vessel is formed from paper, and the surfaces are variously treated with tiny fragments of crushed eggshell, pressed to create the illusion of cracked glazing, and mosaicked with seashell to add iridescence. Layers of mineral pigment are then applied to create variations in colour before the vessels are mounted onto hollowed-out wooden blocks. The surface of the wood is also treated using these materials and techniques. The rings are finished using kashu-urushi, a type of lacquer sourced from cashew trees, sanded to create a smooth finish.
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Patrick Bongoy. Textile: CY15’, 2023. Recycled rubber, inner tubes, silicone, metal valves and wire. 180 x 175 x 10 cm. This woven work has been created using salvaged materials, including inner tubes of tyres, found metals and wire. The rubber has been washed, cut into fine strips and woven into intricate panels which are then layered and manipulated to create a dense, three-dimensional relief. This process draws on traditional basket-making techniques, referencing the physical labour that defines day-to-day life in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, while the regeneration and repurposing of materials, especially rubber, addresses issues of economic exploitation and environmental degradation.. Patrick Bongoy
Textile: CY15’, 2023
Recycled rubber, inner tubes, silicone, metal valves and wire
180 x 175 x 10 cm
This woven work has been created using salvaged materials, including inner tubes of tyres, found metals and wire. The rubber has been washed, cut into fine strips and woven into intricate panels which are then layered and manipulated to create a dense, three-dimensional relief. This process draws on traditional basket-making techniques, referencing the physical labour that defines day-to-day life in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, while the regeneration and repurposing of materials, especially rubber, addresses issues of economic exploitation and environmental degradation.
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Raven Halfmoon. Sculpture: Weeping Willow Women, 2022. Ceramic and glaze. 183 x 117 x 183 cm. This monumental ceramic work pays tribute to the artist’s Caddo Nation ancestors and ancestral techniques. The dark chocolate clay reflects the homeland of the Caddo where they have sourced clay for thousands of years. The work fuses Caddo ceramic traditions with studio ceramic techniques and has been realised using the hand-built coil method, an impressive technical accomplishment at this scale. Six heads feature in the work, three emerging on each side, with one side glazed in cream and the other in red, a reference to both the Oklahoma soil and other important Indigenous issues, such as the murder of Indigenous women. Expressive impressions of the artist’s hands can be seen across the work’s surface, and it is finished with contrasting black and red gestural mark-making that references Caddo symbols used in pottery, tattooing and other cultural items.. Raven Halfmoon
Sculpture: Weeping Willow Women, 2022
Ceramic and glaze
183 x 117 x 183 cm
This monumental ceramic work pays tribute to the artist’s Caddo Nation ancestors and ancestral techniques. The dark chocolate clay reflects the homeland of the Caddo where they have sourced clay for thousands of years. The work fuses Caddo ceramic traditions with studio ceramic techniques and has been realised using the hand-built coil method, an impressive technical accomplishment at this scale. Six heads feature in the work, three emerging on each side, with one side glazed in cream and the other in red, a reference to both the Oklahoma soil and other important Indigenous issues, such as the murder of Indigenous women. Expressive impressions of the artist’s hands can be seen across the work’s surface, and it is finished with contrasting black and red gestural mark-making that references Caddo symbols used in pottery, tattooing and other cultural items.
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Yuefeng He. Sculpture: Bamboo Rock, 2020. Bamboo, lacquer, tile ash and linen. 140 x 80 x 60 cm. Combining exquisite bamboo weaving with lacquerwork, this piece demonstrates a mastery of both techniques which are rarely seen in combination. Bamboo has been woven in a hexagonal structure to create a stone-shaped work. Linen has then been layered over sections of the work, with intense red lacquer carefully applied and later sanded to create a glossy finish. A series of oblong panels have been left exposed, creating a tension between the materials, and contrasting solidity with lightness. The work has been realized on an impressive scale and its shape is reminiscent of scholars’ stones, which speak to ancient Chinese literary traditions.. Yuefeng He
Sculpture: Bamboo Rock, 2020
Bamboo, lacquer, tile ash and linen
140 x 80 x 60 cm
Combining exquisite bamboo weaving with lacquerwork, this piece demonstrates a mastery of both techniques which are rarely seen in combination. Bamboo has been woven in a hexagonal structure to create a stone-shaped work. Linen has then been layered over sections of the work, with intense red lacquer carefully applied and later sanded to create a glossy finish. A series of oblong panels have been left exposed, creating a tension between the materials, and contrasting solidity with lightness. The work has been realized on an impressive scale and its shape is reminiscent of scholars’ stones, which speak to ancient Chinese literary traditions.
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Racso Jugarap. Sculpture: Echinoid, 2023. Galvanised iron, gold leaf and resin. 42 x 27 x 25 cm. Galvanized wires, delicately shaped into wishbones, have been dipped in resin and painstakingly soldered one by one onto a grid to create this gourd-shaped work which takes inspiration from sea urchins. The work has been airbrushed with black and adorned with specks of delicate gold leaf, before being sealed with a final coat of resin that adds luster and evokes dew drops or fossilized insects encased in amber.. Racso Jugarap
Sculpture: Echinoid, 2023
Galvanised iron, gold leaf and resin
42 x 27 x 25 cm
Galvanized wires, delicately shaped into wishbones, have been dipped in resin and painstakingly soldered one by one onto a grid to create this gourd-shaped work which takes inspiration from sea urchins. The work has been airbrushed with black and adorned with specks of delicate gold leaf, before being sealed with a final coat of resin that adds luster and evokes dew drops or fossilized insects encased in amber.
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Weon Rhee (Johnwon Lee). Object: Primitive Structures (Botanical), 2023. PSL Beam (recycled wood), pearl coloured pigment and green pigment. 37 x 79 x 44 cm. Inspired by naturally occurring forms, this table has been created from parallel-strand lumber (PSL), a material made of recycled and compressed wood strands, and moulded into a shape reminiscent of mushrooms. The material has been crafted to give it a dense texture, with an appearance similar to stone, and the work was inspired by Bronze and Iron Age dolmen tombs found in many places across the world including Korea. A coating of transparent pearlescent and green pigments have been sprayed onto the surface. The translucency of this finish allows the underlying texture of the wood to come through, evoking delicate moss.. Weon Rhee (Johnwon Lee)
Object: Primitive Structures (Botanical), 2023
PSL Beam (recycled wood), pearl coloured pigment and green pigment
37 x 79 x 44 cm
Inspired by naturally occurring forms, this table has been created from parallel-strand lumber (PSL), a material made of recycled and compressed wood strands, and moulded into a shape reminiscent of mushrooms. The material has been crafted to give it a dense texture, with an appearance similar to stone, and the work was inspired by Bronze and Iron Age dolmen tombs found in many places across the world including Korea. A coating of transparent pearlescent and green pigments have been sprayed onto the surface. The translucency of this finish allows the underlying texture of the wood to come through, evoking delicate moss.
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Ozioma Onuzulike. Textile: Embroidered Royal Jumper for Peter Obi, 2023. Clay, ash glaze, recycled glass, engobe, and copper wire. 224 x 230 x 12 cm. This ceramic tapestry has been constructed from thousands of handcrafted clay palm kernel shells, which are woven together using copper wire to resemble sumptuous West African textiles such as Akwete, Aso Oke and Kente. Each shell is bisque-fired, then selectively dipped into ash glazes, before being inlaid with glass from crushed recycled bottles. With the addition of glass, the shells resemble beads historically used as tokens to trade enslaved people, but now considered items of prestige and status in much of West Africa.. Ozioma Onuzulike
Textile: Embroidered Royal Jumper for Peter Obi, 2023
Clay, ash glaze, recycled glass, engobe, and copper wire
224 x 230 x 12 cm
This ceramic tapestry has been constructed from thousands of handcrafted clay palm kernel shells, which are woven together using copper wire to resemble sumptuous West African textiles such as Akwete, Aso Oke and Kente. Each shell is bisque-fired, then selectively dipped into ash glazes, before being inlaid with glass from crushed recycled bottles. With the addition of glass, the shells resemble beads historically used as tokens to trade enslaved people, but now considered items of prestige and status in much of West Africa.
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Saar Scheerlings. Sculpture: Talisman Sculpture: The Column, 2023. Foam, old French linen, various yarns, oakwood and metal. 48 x 24 x 245 cm. This work employs a sculptural approach to textiles and upholstery techniques to explore the significance of the column form, which recurs in architectural traditions across cultures in various guises. Here a totem has been created from repurposed foam mattresses which have been cut into slices and covered with intricate handwoven French linens to create 82 cushions. Each cushion was stacked and then bound together using yarn. By varying the degree of tension in each knot, the compression of the foam is controlled and manipulated.. Saar Scheerlings
Sculpture: Talisman Sculpture: The Column, 2023
Foam, old French linen, various yarns, oakwood and metal
48 x 24 x 245 cm
This work employs a sculptural approach to textiles and upholstery techniques to explore the significance of the column form, which recurs in architectural traditions across cultures in various guises. Here a totem has been created from repurposed foam mattresses which have been cut into slices and covered with intricate handwoven French linens to create 82 cushions. Each cushion was stacked and then bound together using yarn. By varying the degree of tension in each knot, the compression of the foam is controlled and manipulated.
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Norman Weber. Brooch: Juwel, 2022. Plastic and acrylic paint. Various dimensions. This series employs 3D-printed plastic to create kaleidoscopic jewellery. Each individual piece has been created using computer-aided design (CAD), and painted with acrylic in oranges, yellows and greens to mimic the appearance of found objects which have been weathered and bleached by the sun. Assembled, moulded and surface-treated by hand, the works appear to feature an array of faceted and uncut gems, arranged in concentric circles, despite being crafted from non-precious materials.. Norman Weber
Brooch: Juwel, 2022
Plastic and acrylic paint
Various dimensions
This series employs 3D-printed plastic to create kaleidoscopic jewellery. Each individual piece has been created using computer-aided design (CAD), and painted with acrylic in oranges, yellows and greens to mimic the appearance of found objects which have been weathered and bleached by the sun. Assembled, moulded and surface-treated by hand, the works appear to feature an array of faceted and uncut gems, arranged in concentric circles, despite being crafted from non-precious materials.
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