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Juliette Même. HEAR, Haute école des arts du Rhin. Selected Graduate 2020

Published: 17.11.2020
Juliette Même Juliette Même
Author:
Haute école des arts du Rhin HEAR
Edited by:
Klimt02
Edited at:
Barcelona
Edited on:
2020
.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.

Intro
Juliette never lacks ingenious, bright ideas and will always carry on creating amazing objects out of almost nothing, whatever happens. She just simply crafts jewels, with sensitivity, fun, and insatiable creative hunger. All the ordinary raw materials she comes across suddenly take on a new life. Anything “next to nothing” or «le trois fois rien» is an inspiration.
/ Sophie Hanagarth and Florence Lehmann
With her constantly updated process and precise protocol, she transforms a beer can or toilet paper, giving value to something that has none, manufacturing objects on her “out of the ordinary” workbench (H(ors) du commun was the title of her Master’s thesis) like an alchemist changing base matter into gold.

Since she created a backpack to carry around a fold-up workbench and the minimum tools required, she has organized her future life out of school. Traveling as she works, she gathers other materials and has new encounters. As she takes jewelry to unexpected places, opening up new horizons, she fulfills her mission of revealing it to new sectors of the public, away from the beaten track.

Inspired by the history and raw materials of the places where she lives, she chose to break down a famous brand’s beer cans in Strasbourg to craft her Houblons brooches. In Slovakia, she assembled bits of decrepit walls that had fallen on the ground to make a series of Peace of Wall brooches and a bothersome detail in public toilets led to Precious privacy, a toilet-paper brooch. In Spring 2020, she took up residence in her 1m2 childhood cabin in the family garden to create her own artist’s residence, using it to transform the vegetable and organic matter that she had to hand.

We eagerly await the opportunity to wear the future treasures from nothing that will spill out of your future conquests. You have just sown Houblons in the Pforzheim Schmuckmuseum… Bravo Juliette: enjoy the journey!

/ Sophie Hanagarth and Florence Lehmann


What I want to talk about is an attempt to bring meaning out of things that have none, or more of it, because they are part of our daily life. I play on shape and matter, taking them into my work by handling objects from my daily environment. Everything is there. All that is required is to take the time to consider these materials that have been left aside, giving way to other levels of perception. Placing them in their transformed state on a person’s body helps me to display their value, making something that “theoretically” had none “bear interest”.

When I arrived at the HEAR, after two years’ training in metalworking, I began to work on “Kronenbourg” beer packaging. This initial research was an attempt to show how interesting and valuable it was just to share an ordinary beer with friends. This led me to explore the plastics potential of these materials from beer packaging (glass, aluminium, steel, and cardboard sheets), by giving them the shapes that I associate with this drink. That is how my enjoyment for a personal interpretation and “misappropriation” of objects and second-hand materials grew more acute. For me, it’s a way of communicating my vision of ordinary things in which my artist and jeweler’s eye perceives particular qualities similar to those of the precious materials traditionally used to manufacture jewels. Toilet paper, beer cans, waste, shards, bits of vehicle reflectors discovered on the ground, Easter-egg wrappings, and clothes-dryer felt are just several of many materials that interest me and that I enjoy revealing in an unusual way through my work.

During my Erasmus study at the Bratislava in The Academy of Fine Arts and Design (AFAD-VSVU) during the 2018-19 winter semester, my research took a different direction. Whilst I was there, I realized that working with matter from ordinary life was part of a contextual approach to the world around me. From the point of view of a foreigner, I noticed and interpreted things that were quite mundane to the Slovaks around me. There, for example, I was fascinated by the decrepit facades of some buildings, so I picked up the bits that had dropped off the walls. Once I got back to the workshop, as I reflected on this raw material, I quickly reached the conclusion that the wall was highly symbolic. In fact, the “iron curtain” would have prevented me, as a French person, from entering Slovakia 50 years before. These pretty little colored fragments have taken on more somber hues since then. I shaped them into little, slightly childlike, naive birds. The bird is a symbol of peace and may also fly beyond walls and boundaries. 

Last Spring, I had to return to my parents’ home because of the lockdown. I thought of this time as a period in artistic residence. I set up a workshop in my childhood cabin at the bottom of the garden and there I explored my past, my childhood, and my relationship with this place where I grew up, where my roots were. Here also, I tried to work with what I had to hand. It was during the springtime, so I worked with the flowers and plants all around me. During this period the symbol of the house was ever-present to encourage us to stay at home. I made this shape my own, expressing it in different pieces.

This determination to work in relation to my environment led me to consider my workshop area in a different light than that of a static place between four walls, cut off from reality. I dreamed up a system to help me create wherever I am: a workshop in my backpack! I can wear it like a jewel, taking it everywhere I go, as I wish, on my body.

/ Juliette Même


More work and contact:
Website: http://juliettememe.com
Email: juliette.meme@laposte.net
Instagram: @juliettememe_jewelry
Phone number: +33 (0)6 29 98 93 91

Name of graduation student: Juliette Même.
Name of the guiding teacher: Prof. Sophie Hanagarth and Prof. Florence Lehmann.

Find out more about the courses at HEAR, Haute école des arts du Rhin.

 
Juliette Même. Installation: Dans la cabane, 2020. Different objects and images. Installation for my Master’s Degree show.. Photo by: Florence Lehmann. Juliette Même
Installation: Dans la cabane, 2020
Different objects and images. Installation for my Master’s Degree show.
Photo by: Florence Lehmann
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Juliette Même. Brooch: #5, 2019. Toilet paper, zinc and steel thread.. 5 x 9 x 3 cm. Photo by: Juliette Même. From series: Precious Privacy. Juliette Même
Brooch: #5, 2019
Toilet paper, zinc and steel thread.
5 x 9 x 3 cm
Photo by: Juliette Même
From series: Precious Privacy
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Juliette Même. Brooch: Houblon, l’alsacienne, 2019. Aluminum from beer packaging. . 9 x 9 x 5 cm. Photo by: Juliette Même. Part of: Pforzheim Schmuck Museum. Juliette Même
Brooch: Houblon, l’alsacienne, 2019
Aluminum from beer packaging. 
9 x 9 x 5 cm
Photo by: Juliette Même
Part of: Pforzheim Schmuck Museum
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Juliette Même. Brooch: Houblon, La slovaque, 2018. Aluminum from Slovak beer packaging (Zlatý Bazant) and steel thread.. 8 x 8 x 5 cm. Photo by: Juliette Même. Part of: Pforzheim Schmuck Museum. Juliette Même
Brooch: Houblon, La slovaque, 2018
Aluminum from Slovak beer packaging (Zlatý Bazant) and steel thread.
8 x 8 x 5 cm
Photo by: Juliette Même
Part of: Pforzheim Schmuck Museum
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Juliette Même. Necklace: Peace of Wall, 2018. Pieces from the damaged walls of Bratislava, zinc and cotton ribbon.. 15 x 20 cm. Juliette Même
Necklace: Peace of Wall, 2018
Pieces from the damaged walls of Bratislava, zinc and cotton ribbon.
15 x 20 cm
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Juliette Même. Brooch: Peace of Wall, 2018. Pieces from the damaged walls of Bratislava and brass.. Right: 4 x 3 x 1 cm, Left: 9 x 6 x 1 cm. Photo by: Iris Bodemer. Juliette Même
Brooch: Peace of Wall, 2018
Pieces from the damaged walls of Bratislava and brass.
Right: 4 x 3 x 1 cm, Left: 9 x 6 x 1 cm
Photo by: Iris Bodemer
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Juliette Même. Necklace: Tessons perdus, 2017. Glass and steel from beer packaging.. 25 x 2 x 0.5 cm. Photo by: Juliette Même. Juliette Même
Necklace: Tessons perdus, 2017
Glass and steel from beer packaging.
25 x 2 x 0.5 cm
Photo by: Juliette Même
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
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