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Sandra Hiredal. Konstfack University of Arts, Crafts and Design. Selected Graduate 2020

Published: 13.11.2020
Sandra Hiredal. Photo by Helena Perminger. Sandra Hiredal. Photo by Helena Perminger.
Author:
Crafts and Design Konstfack University of Arts
Edited by:
Klimt02
Edited at:
Barcelona
Edited on:
2020
.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.

Intro
From the very beginning of the ancient history of jewellery, it has been used as a method of linking body and site. A seashell or a stone was put on a string to be worn. The human body was put in dialogue with the greater story of materiality and site. In the project Traces, Sandra Hiredal has taken her starting point in abandoned places. In this abandonment, those places have been resting in their own memories. In her method, Sandra Hiredal has approached sites with great care and slowly brought their sedimented memories to life. She has documented and collected fragments of life which, through her jewellery, are joined together into new meanings which worn by new bodies are linked to these places.
/ Professor Anders Ljungberg
In a place that has been abandoned, I have collected the human-made traces. Preserving the perishability of these places, which might otherwise have passed us unnoticed in history. I save the small memory to hold close and pass on to the next one. When placed in a jewellery context, we may care for them more tenderly. I do not want to physically mark anyone, but I want to come close.  A piercing of the clothes: brooches.
 
You who left it,
I who collected,
And the next one to wear.
 
We all become involved and equally important. With the fragments taken from the place, I add my own imprint in the craftsmanship of the jewellery. Each brooch is fragile and the next wearer will become a caretaker of our traces and history. I strive to put my work in the context of a gift economy. My collecting from places is exchanged for a return of brooches to another place and another human being. To take what is left from someone before me and give back a piece of me to someone else.
 
To visually connect all the brooches, I choose to start from the same surface structure. The fragile traces bind together with the durable metal to create a meeting between the fragile and the sustainable; The eternal and the perishable. In a creative act, these parts often coexist.
They become an artifact, preserving a memory, thought, idea, or feeling. Components that connect to something that can be visually exposed to others or just oneself. The thought that becomes something tactile; Something to feel; something to wear, and in wearing we come close to each other.
 
You who were,
I who are,
And you who will come.
 
I do not know who you were, I just have my imagination of it.
You, who is coming, will you know who I am?
What we create together?
To wear the partially unknown. Is it just the fragile thought of what may have been, that brings us together? Or what we will be? A mutual okay in not knowing; A mutual respect in the changing.
Traces can be left, and memories preserved. They can be passed on through the visible and the tangible. They can be experienced or relived when we feel and see.
The next one can see and feel a place and person; the traces, stories and the imagination created in the experience.

/ Sandra Hiredal
 

More work and contacts:
Email: Hiredal@hotmail.com
Website: www.sandrahiredal.com
Instagram: @sandra.hiredal
 
Name of graduation student: Sandra Hiredal.
Name of the guiding teacher: Anders Ljungberg.

Find out more about the courses at Konstfack University of Arts, Craft and Design.

 
Sandra Hiredal. Brooch: Traces, 2020. Bronze, silver, steel, found materials (plastic, paper, cardboard, paint, iron, etc.).. Photo by: Helena Perminger. Sandra Hiredal
Brooch: Traces, 2020
Bronze, silver, steel, found materials (plastic, paper, cardboard, paint, iron, etc.).
Photo by: Helena Perminger
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Sandra Hiredal. Brooch: Mumintrollet, 2020. Bronze, silver, steel, found materials: memory card (paper).. 4 x 5.5 cm. Photo by: Helena Perminger. Sandra Hiredal
Brooch: Mumintrollet, 2020
Bronze, silver, steel, found materials: memory card (paper).
4 x 5.5 cm
Photo by: Helena Perminger
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Sandra Hiredal. Brooch: Strass, 2020. Bronze, silver, steel, found materials: rhinestones (plastic).. 5 x 9 cm. Photo by: Helena Perminger. Sandra Hiredal
Brooch: Strass, 2020
Bronze, silver, steel, found materials: rhinestones (plastic).
5 x 9 cm
Photo by: Helena Perminger
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Sandra Hiredal. Brooch: Strass, 2020. Bronze, silver, steel, found materials: rhinestones (plastic).. 5 x 9 cm. Photo by: Helena Perminger. Back view. . Sandra Hiredal
Brooch: Strass, 2020
Bronze, silver, steel, found materials: rhinestones (plastic).
5 x 9 cm
Photo by: Helena Perminger

Back view.

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Sandra Hiredal. Brooch: Põhjala tehas, 2020. Bronze, silver, steel, found materials: plastic, iron.. 7.5 x 13 cm. Photo by: Helena Perminger. Sandra Hiredal
Brooch: Põhjala tehas, 2020
Bronze, silver, steel, found materials: plastic, iron.
7.5 x 13 cm
Photo by: Helena Perminger
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Sandra Hiredal. Brooch: Säter, 2020. Bronze, silver, steel, found materials: plastic.. 6 x 9 cm. Photo by: Helena Perminger. Sandra Hiredal
Brooch: Säter, 2020
Bronze, silver, steel, found materials: plastic.
6 x 9 cm
Photo by: Helena Perminger
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
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