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My Work Is An Organic Process, I Don't Think Using Technology Would Allow That Freedom. Faye Hall interviewed by Klimt02

Interview  /  Artists
Published: 01.07.2020
Faye Hall Faye Hall
Author:
Klimt02
Edited by:
Klimt02
Edited at:
Barcelona
Edited on:
2020
Faye Hall. Brooch: Pieces 1 -4, 2019. Linoleum, wax, steel, plastic, woodash, flock, cork, rubber, sawdust, damar resin, cotton, nylon, propolis, plaster, leather, brass, stainless steel. 7 x 6 x 2 cm. Photo by: Faye Hall. Faye Hall
Brooch: Pieces 1 -4, 2019
Linoleum, wax, steel, plastic, woodash, flock, cork, rubber, sawdust, damar resin, cotton, nylon, propolis, plaster, leather, brass, stainless steel
7 x 6 x 2 cm
Photo by: Faye Hall
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.

Intro
I’m actually a little bit of a technophobe in terms of my personal artistic process! Whilst I think technological advances are incredible and making great changes to our lives, the environment and healthcare, within my practice I am very much hands on- everything I make is made my hand, from scratch. I love to hand cut, pierce, manipulate materials and to allow my pieces to evolve through a tactile approach. I love the slowness of stitching and filing.
Tell us about your background. What were your first influences to be creative and become an artist and what has drawn you to contemporary jewellery?
I actually trained in textile design and worked in that industry for over a decade creating embellished and surface led fabrics for both fashion and interiors. It was after having my first son that I became drawn to the more intimate and intricate scale of jewellery and finding ways to create interesting surfaces and forms at this smaller scale. I have always loved creating tactile work and am fascinated by the challenges that come with bringing harmony and order to a relatively chaotic collection of materials that I collect and like to use. The textile designing skills I have gained over the years have transferred exceptionally well for me into my current jewellery practice.


How important is networking for you in your professional practice and what are your preferred tools for this?
The wider creative community is such an amazing thing; I feel so very thankful that I have been welcomed into it and supported by so many wonderful practitioners. I have made some brilliant connections, found exciting collaborative and exhibiting opportunities and also found some of my most valued customers through exhibiting at shows, and also on online platforms such as Instagram. I absolutely love Instagram- I prefer a visual language to text and this works really well for me to interact with all of the above.
 
 
What are your general thoughts on the contemporary jewellery world, (education, market, development...), where do you see chances and where are dead ends?
 
I think that the contemporary jewellery world just keeps getting more exciting, with the introduction of new processes and materials to explore. I also think that with art jewellery, the lines between jewellery and sculpture, object and design are so blurred that it can’t help but be an intriguing place to sit. I think that there is a definite direction of artists pursuing more sustainable options, pushing boundaries with material and approaches which is great to see too. Alongside my practice, I still teach Textile Design to Degree level students and I feel that it is even more imperative to teach future generations the value and impact of innovation, and creativity whilst rising above the government funding cuts here in the UK at the moment.
 

Thinking about your career, what role do technology and digital play in your artistic development & communication?
I’m actually a little bit of a technophobe in terms of my personal artistic process! Whilst I think technological advances are incredible and making great changes to our lives, the environment and healthcare, within my practice I am very much hands-on- everything I make is made my hand, from scratch. I love to hand-cut, pierce, manipulate materials, and to allow my pieces to evolve through a tactile approach. I love the slowness of stitching and filing. Whilst there has been the occasional desire to save time and get my woodcut at the laser cutter, or get my surfaces stitched using CAD- I could never actually do this as I love the entire process too much. I also quite often change my mind midway through making a piece, making a fast intuitive decision to swap say, formica to linoleum, or a hand casted section to found glass; my work is a very organic process and I don’t think using technology would allow that freedom. I do however believe that there is a great big opportunity for artists to continue to sell and connect online, now and in the future, and luckily using the internet is one part of technology that I do love using!


Neckpiece: Pieces Neckpiece 2, 2019, Leather, cork, woodash, plaster, bio-resin, rubber, cotton, internal steel connections, 20 x 1 x 1.1 cm, Photo by: Faye Hall

 
How has your work changed over the past few years and what are you excited about these days?
Even over the past year my work has evolved. I am now allowing myself to really challenge the elements that I want to rather than what I feel I should be doing. I am more confident in my choices; I trust my intuition with materials completely and am being more adventurous with what I can try to manipulate. For example, I spent many months last year working out a way to make forms using propolis, and tree resins. I was mesmerized by their properties and didn’t stop until I could find a way to make the raw form work for me. This curiosity really drives me to find out new visual information and to test my own processes and skills- I’m never bored! I currently feel finally at a place where I have found my artistic voice and what I would like to share, and I am really excited about that to keep on developing. I am particularly excited by challenging a viewer’s perception of material and am working on some intriguing samples at the moment which I can’t wait to pursue! My practice is anchored to making intriguing, harmonious objects through combining contrasting materials- there’s nothing quite like the satisfaction I get from achieving this.
Appreciate APPRECIATE