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I investigate textile techniques and antagonistic materials in a sensorial way. Interview with Patricia Iglesias by Klimt02

Interview  /  Artists
Published: 04.11.2021
Patricia Iglesias Patricia Iglesias
Author:
Klimt02
Edited by:
Klimt02
Edited at:
Barcelona
Edited on:
2021
Patricia Iglesias. Neckpiece: Inheritance, 2021. Nylon, sisal, jute, cotton, plastic, raffia cords, cell phone cord, cotton and jute threads, plastic meshes, molten plastic from bottles.. 30 x 48 x 13 cm. Photo by: Jorge Carcamo. From series: Trial and error. Patricia Iglesias
Neckpiece: Inheritance, 2021
Nylon, sisal, jute, cotton, plastic, raffia cords, cell phone cord, cotton and jute threads, plastic meshes, molten plastic from bottles.
30 x 48 x 13 cm
Photo by: Jorge Carcamo
From series: Trial and error
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.

Intro
It took me a while to realise that my work arises from the subjective connections I make between concepts, questioning and imaginary.
Tell us about your background. What were your first influences to be creative and become an artist and what has drawn you to contemporary jewellery?
As a child I liked drawing and painting, in short, making things with my hands. I also liked to share my grandmothers' spaces; my maternal grandmother was a dressmaker and I was captivated by spending hours in her kitchen-workshop, watching her, imitating her, designing clothes for me and my dolls, she made my clothes and I made my dolls' clothes. My paternal grandmother knitted and embroidered, I loved playing crochet and drawing clothes that she would later knit for me. They passed on to me the love and value of handmade things.
For a long time, I dedicated myself to furniture design, furniture restoration, decorative painting and teaching subjects related to the creation of didactic material for early childhood. At the same time, I was in a permanent search for a means of expression, taking drawing, painting and ceramics classes, until I arrived at the workshop of Marcela Alcaíno, a master goldsmith in my hometown. The possibility of connecting constructed objects with the body made a lot of sense to me. After a short time and after obtaining a grant from the National Fund for the Arts, Culture and Heritage to develop a project in the area of crafts, which I carried out with silver and wood, I discovered that I could connect with contemporary jewellery as a means of expression and reflection. When I joined the Chilean Contemporary Jewellers Association Joya Brava and after some tutorials with the Honorato+Vicencio Studio, I began to experiment with techniques and textile materials; what I had learned from watching my grandmothers began to make sense and contemporary jewellery became the pulse for reflection.
 
 
How important is networking for you in your professional practice and what are your preferred tools for this? 
It is important to counteract the solitude of the craft, in my workshop I work alone, so I take part in workshops and tutorials from time to time to broaden my vision, expand my thinking and allow myself to be seduced by new questions and material experimentation. I have been taking part in the tutorials of Honorato and Vicencio Study for some years now, sharing with other jewellers different visions and topics of interest, which facilitates reflection and exchange beyond the work itself.
I also consider group development and collaborative work necessary, which is why I am involved with some groups of which I am a member, with which I work passionately, such as Joya Brava, Association of Contemporary Chilean Jewellers and La Brújula Arte en Tránsito, a platform and network for collaboration between creators and spaces for the dissemination of art.
 
 
What are your general thoughts on the contemporary jewellery world, (education, market, development...), where do you see chances and where are dead ends?
In general, there are few schools linked to contemporary jewellery in Chile, the preparation is based on workshops and tutorships, either by bringing guest artists to Chile or by travelling abroad. In this sense, the pandemic has opened up the possibility of accessing workshops, tutorships and classes virtually, making it easier for us to get closer to what we are interested in.
The interesting market is still small, we must continue working on the preparation of audiences and Joya Brava, an association of contemporary Chilean jewellers, collaborates in this by preparing its members through tutorships for exhibitions that can be presented both in Chile and abroad. The events organised by the Latin American Biennial of Contemporary Jewellery and the Contemporary Jewellery Week in Brazil also facilitate the preparation of audiences and the visibility of Contemporary Jewellery. On the other hand, from Chile, through La Brújula Arte en Transito, we manage and move exhibitions of Contemporary Jewellery.
 
 
Thinking about your career, what role do technology and the digital play in your artistic development & communication?
Through my work I investigate textile techniques and antagonistic materials in a sensorial way, so I do not apply technology directly, it is through digital media that I use its scope and advantages; to communicate my work, to communicate with my peers, with the public and also to attend lectures and to take and teach distance learning courses.
 
 
How has your work changed over the past few years and what are you excited about these days?
My work, in the beginning, was linked to metals and collected wood, little by little I began to identify with some textile techniques, which I took beyond their original function, dabbling with antagonistic and sensorial materials to produce objects that are linked to the body in a performative way and thus, put our sensibility on alert.
It took me a while to realise that my work arises from the subjective connections I make between concepts, questioning and imaginary, allowing me to explore the possibilities of materials and textile techniques, favouring my enthusiasm for suggesting a constant dialogue in my object work.
I am attracted by the idea of continuing to explore forms resulting from my imagination, associated with the concepts or ideas that concern me and to construct them from hybridisation of techniques, where the protagonists are the textile techniques related to those that are carried out especially in those domestic and family spaces.
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