Back

I think Networking is The New Norm. Philip Noakes interviewed by Klimt02

Interview  /  Artists
Published: 12.08.2020
I think Networking is The New Norm. Philip Noakes interviewed by Klimt02.
Author:
Klimt02
Edited by:
Klimt02
Edited at:
Barcelona
Edited on:
2020
Philip Noakes. Object: Pineapple pair of object d’art, 2019. Sterling silver, 18ct gold, Mounted on black granite plinths.. 9 x 9 x 28.5 cm. Photo by: Acorn Photo Robert Frith. Philip Noakes
Object: Pineapple pair of object d’art, 2019
Sterling silver, 18ct gold, Mounted on black granite plinths.
9 x 9 x 28.5 cm
Photo by: Acorn Photo Robert Frith
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.

Intro
In Perth, Australia, the contemporary jewellery world is having a very difficult time with the lack of tertiary institutions teaching jewellery design and construction. Two of the universities have closed their Fine Arts/Design degrees. I established a teaching studio in late 2012 as there were identifiable gaps in courses that taught contemporary jewellery and silversmithing hand skills (construction) at both beginners and advanced levels.
Tell us about your background. What were your first influences to be creative and become an artist and what has drawn you to contemporary jewellery
From the very first copper and brass candlestick I made in high school, I knew I was interested in forming and shaping metal.
I trained as a silversmith and jeweller in the late 1960s and early ‘70s in London and visited galleries to familiarise myself with traditional and Scandinavian metal work of the time, which convinced me of my career choice. This time in London was exciting and enervating with new ways of approaching centuries-old skills and craft.
 
 
How important is networking in your professional practice and what are your preferred tools …
I think networking is the new norm —, especially social media such as Instagram and Facebook — as it increases ones exposure to a wide range of audiences both in Australia and overseas. My following on Instagram increased threefold during COVID-19 isolation because galleries and other venues that display my work were closed. However, general word-of-mouth networking is also important, and shouldn’t be underestimated, as it has resulted in increased sales and offers of future exhibitions.
 
 
What are your general thoughts on the contemporary jewellery world (education, market, development etc.) where do you see chances, and where are the dead ends?
In Perth, Australia, the contemporary jewellery world is having a very difficult time with the lack of tertiary institutions teaching jewellery design and construction. Two of the universities have closed their Fine Arts/Design degrees. I established a teaching studio in late 2012 as there were identifiable gaps in courses that taught contemporary jewellery and silversmithing hand skills (construction) at both beginners and advanced levels. There is also a lack of emphasis on teaching drawing skills/design that cannot be compensated for by CAD design. The market for contemporary work is very small in Perth and there is no gallery exposing the public to new designs.
 
 
Thinking about your career, what role do technology and digital play in your artistic development and communication.
My initial training was based on hand-construction skills, drawing and rendering, which still allow me to follow line and form. In 2016, the Goldsmith’s Centre in London provided an opportunity for Continuous Profession Development to learn new techniques and build a skills base around the use of up-to-date equipment and recent technological innovations. I have now been able to incorporate these skills with my traditional silversmithing practices. 
 
I utilise social media tools to keep abreast of new innovations and technologies as well as the work of other contemporary jewellers and silversmiths. Marketing of my new collections is initially undertaken through social media, my website and other online forums and galleries.
 
 
How has your work changed over the past few years and what are you excited about these days.
When I moved to Australia in the late 1970s I focused on contemporary jewellery and I opened a contemporary jewellery gallery and workshop in Sydney. It was the first of its kind and broke new ground by seeking out and providing exposure for contemporary jewellers in fashion and design magazines, as well as promoting studio jewellery through an exhibition program. My contemporary jewellery won many awards, gained numerous accolades for its quality and design and is held in many public and private collections.
 
In late 2016, I returned to my first passion of silversmithing and my “Sculptural Silver” exhibition was the largest showing of hollowware to be held in Western Australia since the 1970s. My main focus for the next period is hollowware and the technical challenges of design, form, surface textures and finishes on various metals.
 
Appreciate APPRECIATE