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Ineke Heerkens.The dynamics in stillness

Interview  /  Artists
Published: 17.02.2015
Ineke Heerkens.The dynamics in stillness.
Author:
Monika Auch
Edited by:
Klimt02
Edited at:
Amsterdam
Edited on:
2015
Ineke Heerkens. Necklace: Ornamental Hey Hey Hey’s, 2013-14. Ceramic, cotton, silk, artificial silk. 280 x 300 x 45 mm. Collection: Shifting Mass
. Technique: hand shaped clay, spraying glaze, hand braided cord
. Photograph by Eddo Hartman. Ineke Heerkens
Necklace: Ornamental Hey Hey Hey’s, 2013-14
Ceramic, cotton, silk, artificial silk
280 x 300 x 45 mm
Collection: Shifting Mass
Technique: hand shaped clay, spraying glaze, hand braided cord
Photograph by Eddo Hartman

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.

Intro
Ineke Heerkens spent a three months residence at Sundaymorning at ekwc immersed in the challenge of making jewellery out of ceramics, resulting in a new collection and the book Shifting Mass.
 
How important is it to return to questions raised at the schuster-nicole-schuster-nicole-beginning-2016-2016 of an artistic research? Is it necessary to give an account? Theoretical explanations are very often boring, leaving scarcely any room for the magic of the process, the quest. However - each serious artist has a question that needs answering and the steps in the quest lead to a multitude of work, an oeuvre.

September 2013, two months after her stay at Sundaymorning@ekwc I talk to Ineke Heerkens about her residency. In her Amsterdam studio surrounded by hundreds of ceramic pieces we talk about the sensory perception of the new collection of jewellery. The rich, softly glowing bounty is displayed on the table, it is an overwhelming amount of material. Next to it are splendid samples of specially twined cords from the Textile lab which will make it into wearable jewellery.


Detail of neckpiece "Ornamental Hey Hey Hey’s"
Photograph by Eddo Hartman


Ineke says: "I have ended up in a new research. How do I combine the elements - beads in the widest meaning of the word - in this last step towards wearable jewellery? The cords have to be subordinate to the ceramic pieces. Yet the cord determines how the elements connect with each other, how they move, if they are fixed in one place or not, even which sound they make when the wearer moves around. The pieces are very different in character: the small hands that evolved out of the 3D scan and 3D printed moulds; the beads turned in classic fashion on a potter’s wheel and the handmade curls and linear shapes. Each element needs a follow-up in order to be wearable. All of them demand an individual solution or answer. That’s why I need so much time to resolve this research."

Did you execute your initial idea about shifting volumes?
I was able to translate the idea directly and quite figuratively and shaped everything by hand by pushing my fingers into the clay and working on the potter’s wheel. All of my collections are about a specific dynamic. I am satisfied about the dynamics of this series. The form of the material evolves out of a movement. The movement is fixed in the clay, frozen, the unbaked clay enters the kiln and thus the direct transmission is imprinted.


Shifting Mass, work in progress at Sundaymorning@ekwc.
Unfired ceramic pieces for "Dynamic Stillness" and "Ornamental Hey Hey Hey’s”
Photograph by artist


The books contain still images of you at work. Your research is about the dynamics of movement, the dislocation of mass by a body - shifting mass. This seems to be a controversy.
My final exam work was about movement, in a conceptual way. There was a horizontal bar where you could do a head-over-heels, turn round and round with your whole body, very fast. In a later project it was about creating “waterholes” by using your whole body. Now I choose a smaller size, the hand, in order to keep the movement small. If I had approached the question in a more physical way by making a movement in clay with my whole body I could have ended up with a very interesting research. But I would still have to make a step to make it applicable. I was not interested in an autonomous form but wanted to find out how to make dynamic ceramic forms which are wearable on the body. As well the advantage of a small size lies in better control of the production process. The challenge was to make jewellery out of ceramics. What I encountered in my research was the fragility of ceramics, the weight, the tactility and - it produces sound.

To return to the former remark about stillness and dynamics: working in ceramics demands a lot of concentration and patience. Producing on a potter’s wheel has a monotonous and addictive character, you want to make each bead better than the last one, push forward! The rules of the material - long drying periods, the firing times and complicated determinations of colour in the glazing process - demand a lot of patience and planning. You end up in another still world of this material. The sensory perceptive dynamics of ceramic jewellery - the weight, the temperature on skin, the reflection of light on the soft colours, the movement, the sound, the friction of elements with each other can only be experienced by wearing it on your body.
 

About the author

Monika Auch is an Amsterdam based artist and editor of Dutch magazine kM, featuring artist’s materials and techniques. With a background in medicine her work and research is about ‘The intelligence of the hand.


 
Ineke Heerkens. Necklace: Dynamic Stillness, 2013-14. Ceramic, cotton. 350 x 140 x 45 mm. Collection: Shifting Mass
. Technique: hand shaped clay, spraying glaze, hand braided cord
. Photograph by Eddo Hartman. Ineke Heerkens
Necklace: Dynamic Stillness, 2013-14
Ceramic, cotton
350 x 140 x 45 mm
Collection: Shifting Mass
Technique: hand shaped clay, spraying glaze, hand braided cord
Photograph by Eddo Hartman

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
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