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SNAG Educational Endowment Scholarships 2018 Winners

Award giving  /  Education  /  06 Jul 2018
Published: 23.07.2018
Lindsay Locatelli. Necklace: Gold Cups, 2018. 24 gold leaf, silver lead, polymer clay, wood, rope.. Lindsay Locatelli
Necklace: Gold Cups, 2018
24 gold leaf, silver lead, polymer clay, wood, rope.
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.

Intro
The Society of North American Goldsmiths (SNAG) has announced the winners of this year’s Educational Endowment Scholarships (EES). Begun in 1992, the annual juried scholarships are among SNAG’s most competitive awards. Each year, SNAG awards six total scholarships under the program.

Artist list

Valerie James, Lindsay Locatelli, Jeffrey M. Clancy, Kelly Temple, Demi Thomloudis, Diya Wang
SNAG awards three student scholarships with at least one award given to a student that is currently an undergraduate. These scholarships are for tuition towards the students’ degree-granting programs. The scholarships are as follows: one $2000 award, one $1500 award and one $1000 award; each includes a one-year SNAG membership. 

SNAG also awards three juried scholarships for emerging and mid-career artists to use toward a workshop of their choice in North America. These awards are as follows: one $2000 award, one $1500 award and one $1000 award; each includes a one-year SNAG membership. Emerging and mid-career artists should not have been enrolled in a degree or certificate program in the past 3 years to qualify.

This year’s winners are:

 
  • Diya Wang, a student at the University of Oregon, is originally from China. Her metalsmithing and jewelry work focuses on geometric shapes inspired by architecture, the industrialized lifestyle of modern China, botanical forms as well as the human body.
  • Demi Thomloudis, a student at the University of Georgia. Her work is inspired by the evolving architecture of large-scale, in-progress construction projects and seeks to reintroduce these spaces and their larger language onto the body.
  • Kelly Temple, a student at San Diego State University. Her work transforms materials that relate to surgery and healing (such as medical adhesives and textiles) into jewelry that serves as a social mediator.
  • Jeffrey M. Clancy, an assistant professor in the jewelry area of the Art Department at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His work questions the concepts of preservation, authenticity, originality and the acquisition of craft skill, transforming domestic and utilitarian objects in ways that transcend function while using a familiar language. 
  • Lindsay Locatelli is based in Bloomfield, MN. With a background in graphic and furniture design, Locatelli creates contemporary art jewelry that highlights nature's bold spirit and kinetic presence, existing as mobile bodies of wearable art that invite interaction between the views of both wearer and observer.
  • Valerie James, a student at the Rhode Island School of Design in Providence RI. Her work is inspired by the notion that an object can have an enduring effect on a person, similar to the way a maker’s mark imbues meaning on a work, even though the meaning of the mark is often lost over time.


This year’s jurors were Beth Ann Gerstein (Executive Director of the American Museum of Ceramic Art in Pomona, CA) and Cathleen McCarthy (a journalist and editor specializing in the jewelry arts and creative small business).
 
Diya Wang. Necklace: The Nature Beyond Nature, 2018. Sterling silver.. Diya Wang
Necklace: The Nature Beyond Nature, 2018
Sterling silver.
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Valerie James. Pendant: Portal No.1, 2018. Carved graphite, sterling silver, leather.. Photo by: Valerie James. Valerie James
Pendant: Portal No.1, 2018
Carved graphite, sterling silver, leather.
Photo by: Valerie James
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Kelly Temple. Necklace: Sensed Restriction, 2018. Silver, steel, leather, self-produced microbial cellulose.. Photo by: Kelly Temple. Kelly Temple
Necklace: Sensed Restriction, 2018
Silver, steel, leather, self-produced microbial cellulose.
Photo by: Kelly Temple
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
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