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Works and Days. In dialogue across time and space

Exhibition  /  MunichJewelleryWeek2020   HIGHLIGHTED-MJW2020  /  10 Mar 2020  -  14 Jun 2020
Published: 28.01.2020
Staatliche Antikensammlungen
Curator:
Mette Saabye, Florian Knauß
Helen Clara Hemsley. Ring: Found on the Floor, 2013. Plastic ring, fabric, cotton, cord, pins.. 6,2 × 8 × 4,5 cm. Photo by: Klaus Haag. Helen Clara Hemsley
Ring: Found on the Floor, 2013
Plastic ring, fabric, cotton, cord, pins.
6,2 × 8 × 4,5 cm
Photo by: Klaus Haag
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.

Intro
The exhibition will be presenting jewellery from the Danish State Arts Jewellery collection, and jewellery from invited artists and will be exhibited next to the antique objects from the Antikensammlung. The exhibition brings together works from two collections, two worlds meet. There is a seminar about the exhibition holds at Galerie Handwerk on 14.03.2020.
The catalogue of the exhibition will be available after the 14.06.2020.

Artist list

Nikolaj Appel, Hanne Behrens, Claus Bjerring, Katrine Borup, Margaret Bridgwater, Kim Buck, Christine Bukkehave, Anne C. Manna, Annette Dam, Agnete Dinesen, Jens Eliasen, Karen Fly, Kasia Gasparski, Arje Griegst, Irene Griegst, Louise Grønlykke, Castello Christian Hansen, Janne K Hansen, Torben Hardenberg, Helen Clara Hemsley, Karen Ihle, Ulrik Jungersen, Kaori Juzu, Malene Kastalje, Jytte Kløve, Marie-Louise Kristensen, Anette Kræn, Anne Lahn, Eva Dora Lamm, Jytte Løppenthin, Helle Løvig Espersen, Gerda Monies, Nikolai Monies, Pernille Mouritzen, Peder Musse, Gitte Nygaard, Nanna Obel, Ole Bent Petersen, Karen Pontoppidan, Camilla Prasch, Kamilla Ruberg, Mette Saabye, Josefine R Smith, Birte Stenbak, Per Suntum, Thorkild Thøgersen, Trine Trier, Ingomar Vangsgaard, Ole W. Jacobsen, Hongxia Wang, Josephine Winther, Lene Wolters
The Danish Arts Foundation was founded in 1964, with the purpose to, among other things, support Danish artists and ensure that citizens, from all over the country, had access to high-quality artistic experiences. Since 1974, The Danish Arts Foundation has purchased works from the various artistic disciplines on an ongoing basis, and by lending them out, they become accessible in public spaces.

In 2007, the foundation came upon an idea concerning the wearable art in the collection and established a lending scheme, based on the very concept that jewellery is created to be worn on the body. Danish citizens, who play an active role at an official public event, may borrow jewellery from the collection, now on permanent display at Koldinghus Museum. The 'jewellery borrowers’ become ambassadors of jewellery art and allow for accessibility and dissemination, by actually wearing the jewellery and by creating a dialogue with a greater section of the population. The jewellery collection also acts as a steadily growing study collection that now comprises around 340 pieces. Together, they provide insight into the development of contemporary Danish jewellery art, which is based on a strong tradition of craftsmanship and strict quality requirements. In addition to gaining an understanding of how this field has progressed, we also gain insight into daily life in Denmark, the core values of society and its development over the last 50 years.

When you look at the jewellery in the collection from the 1970s and onwards, you can see how jewellery artists began to challenge the classic notions of materials, design language and the perception that jewellery is only about decorative objects that represent economic value, social status or exist as visible symbols of human interactions and relations. The artistic dimension, humour and the relationship between jewellery and the body, became vital in the production of Danish jewellery art in that period. The jewellery plays with, makes ironic remarks about, and prods at our cultural identity, charms our sense of humour, and our love of simple shapes and functionality. Some jewellery artists start working towards a more narrative approach. The jewellery becomes wearable art and a kind of body graffiti, with a message for society, about personal beliefs and social/cultural affiliation.

Other jewellery artists represented in the collection are more interested in an experimental investigation of the relationship between, and the interaction with the body, movement and the jewellery’s shape, weight and placement, which stimulate bodily and sensory realisations, and allow for reflections about how we are always present and acknowledge the world through our bodies. The jewellery makes us more aware of the movement of the body because we can actually feel it on us, and by so doing we shape jewellery just as much as it shapes us. The jewellery also helps us to sense every day subliminal deeds. We experience them as if in slow motion, fully conscious of our place in the world. They make us more present in the now, in the everyday, in the world.

The objects in the Antikensammlung, just like the jewellery, reflect the world, a culture, another place, but also another time. They offer us a window through which we get little glimpses of what was important to these people 2-3000 years ago – what they believed in, what they felt. Life, death, love and everyday occurrences. A child playing, parting with a loved one who died way too young. Love and celebrations, war and sorrow - we have experienced it first hand, and recognise it in the people portrayed on the antique vessels. We are there and can sense everything around us, even though it was 2-3000 years ago. Daily life, then and now. 

The exhibition "Works & Days" brings together works from two collections, two worlds meet. With the utmost care, we have selected works from both collections and put them together so that they speak to us and to each other. Through what we know, the past becomes tangible and easier to understand, but we also see how the past affects the present. The works speak to us, together and across time and space. The thematic headlines refer to contents of the dialogue and we notice not only the differences but also how alike our lives have played out in Europe, in the past and the present.

The curatorial approach reflects the concept behind the cultural friendship year between Germany and Denmark. We have shared our knowledge and cultural treasures, in a constructive dialogue, and have both ended up with more than we had before. It has been a great pleasure to collaborate with the Antikensammlung and with my co-curator Dr. Florian Knauss. Despite cultural differences, time and place, our cultures have a lot in common and much to give each other.


/ Mette Saabye, Goldsmith and Jewellery artist. Copenhagen, 1 January 2020.


The exhibition includes the sub-themes, there are 101 works exhibit in total:
1. Treasures & Status
2. Traditions & Innovation
3. Gatherings & Manners
4. Form & Function
5. Precious & Alternative Materials
6. Gods & Mythology
7. Body & Movement
8. Women & Daily life
9. Power & Women
10. Love & War
11. Past & Present
12. Symmetry & Rhythm
13. Dionysos & Ecstasy


About the curators:
Dr. Florian Knauß - Leitender Sammlungsdirektor at Staatliche Antikensammlungen und Glyptothek, München, Germany.
Email: knauss@antike-am-koenigsplatz.mwn.de

Mette Saabye - Goldsmith & jewellery artist, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Email: info@saabye.biz

For more info on the Danish State Arts Foundation Jewellery Collection: https://vores.kunst.dk/en/loans/jewelry

Germany effort 2018-2020
The effort in Germany 2018-2020 consists of four sub-projects each with a long array of initiatives. The primary focus of the effort in 2018 is to create solid platforms between Danish and German institutions of cultural heritage.
From 2018-2020 the effort has a parallel focus on creating strong artistic platforms in the German constituent states. These new artistic platforms will complement the already good historical relations that exist between the Danish art scene and the northern regions of Germany in particular.
Cultural tourism will be a focal point in 2019-2020. This will happen through a collaboration between VisitDenmark, Hamburg, Wonderful Copenhagen and Visit Aarhus.
In 2020, the effort culminates with The Danish-German Year of Friendship 2020. The year of friendship was agreed in 2018 and is an integral part of the Danish three-year effort. The projects under The Danish-German Year of Friendship 2020 is coordinated along with projects that celebrate The Centenary of Denmark's Reunion with Southern Jutland.

Read more info about the German and Danish collaboration and connection via:
https://english.slks.dk/work-areas/international-focus/current-projects/germany-effort-2018-2020/
 
Nikolai Appel. Brooch: Pres á mangé, 2018. 18k gold, sapphires.. 8 x 6 x 4 cm. Photo by: Dorte Krogh. Nikolai Appel
Brooch: Pres á mangé, 2018
18k gold, sapphires.
8 x 6 x 4 cm
Photo by: Dorte Krogh
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Anne Lahn. Brooch: Flower Power Girl, 2018. Copper, enamel, steel wire, silver.. 6.8 x 8.4 x 1 cm. Photo by: Dorte Krogh. Anne Lahn
Brooch: Flower Power Girl, 2018
Copper, enamel, steel wire, silver.
6.8 x 8.4 x 1 cm
Photo by: Dorte Krogh
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Mette Saabye. Necklace: Drops of Dew, 1997. Mother of pearl, steel, 925s.. 15 x 45 x 45 cm. Photo by: Klaus Haag. From series: Drops of Dew. Mette Saabye
Necklace: Drops of Dew, 1997
Mother of pearl, steel, 925s.
15 x 45 x 45 cm
Photo by: Klaus Haag
From series: Drops of Dew
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Mette Saabye. Necklace: Drops of Dew, 1997. Mother of pearl, steel, 925s.. 15 x 45 x 45 cm. Photo by: Klaus Haag. From series: Drops of Dew. On body.. Mette Saabye
Necklace: Drops of Dew, 1997
Mother of pearl, steel, 925s.
15 x 45 x 45 cm
Photo by: Klaus Haag
From series: Drops of Dew

On body.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Helen Clara Hemsley. Ring: Found on the Floor, 2013. Plastic ring, fabric, cotton, cord, pins.. 6,2 × 8 × 4,5 cm. Photo by: Klaus Haag. On body.. Helen Clara Hemsley
Ring: Found on the Floor, 2013
Plastic ring, fabric, cotton, cord, pins.
6,2 × 8 × 4,5 cm
Photo by: Klaus Haag

On body.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Malene Kastalje. Ring: No one knew when it would happen #1, 2015. Silicone, mix media.. 6 × 6.5 × 5.5 cm. Archive of the State Arts Foundation.. Malene Kastalje
Ring: No one knew when it would happen #1, 2015
Silicone, mix media.
6 × 6.5 × 5.5 cm
Archive of the State Arts Foundation.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Jytte Kløve. Brooch: Heart Flower with White Dustbags, 2018. 14k gold, 7 diamonds TW VVS.. 4.6 x 5.5 x 2.2 cm. Archive of the State Arts Foundation.. Jytte Kløve
Brooch: Heart Flower with White Dustbags, 2018
14k gold, 7 diamonds TW VVS.
4.6 x 5.5 x 2.2 cm
Archive of the State Arts Foundation.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Kaori Juzu. Brooch: #2, 2013. Enamel, copper, silver.. 3 x 6 x 2.5 cm. From series: Such Utter Silence. Archive of the State Arts Foundation.. Kaori Juzu
Brooch: #2, 2013
Enamel, copper, silver.
3 x 6 x 2.5 cm
From series: Such Utter Silence
Archive of the State Arts Foundation.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Torben Hardenberg. Brooch: Nine Eleven, 2006. Silver, Gold, Platinum, Enamel, Diamond. 1 x 4 x 5.3 cm. Torben Hardenberg
Brooch: Nine Eleven, 2006
Silver, Gold, Platinum, Enamel, Diamond
1 x 4 x 5.3 cm
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Helle Løvig Espersen. Ring: Heartring, 2003. Red granite.. 1.7 x 3.3 x 3.1 cm. Helle Løvig Espersen
Ring: Heartring, 2003
Red granite.
1.7 x 3.3 x 3.1 cm
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Inner page of the catalogue for the exhibition..
Inner page of the catalogue for the exhibition.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Inner page of the catalogue for the exhibition..
Inner page of the catalogue for the exhibition.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Inner page of the catalogue for the exhibition..
Inner page of the catalogue for the exhibition.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Appreciate APPRECIATE