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Helen Carnac: Marking Place…Antwerp

Workshop  /  03 Mar 2011  -  04 Mar 2011
Published: 17.06.2011
Helen Carnac: Marking Place…Antwerp.
Sint Lucas Antwerpen
Management:
Hilde De Decker
DEADLINE: 25/02/2011
.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.

Intro
Update of the report & images of the results of the workshop: It was obvious from the start, that every student had a different approach to documenting the walk. Some had been collecting found objects since childhood, while others were new to the phenomenon. Some preferred to take pictures, while others knew exactly what to pick up and what not. It was interesting how some students instinctively pointed out ‘collectables’ for others.
From the start, Helen Carnac made clear that she did not know her way around Antwerp. A map was laid out, and students could express how much of Antwerp they knew. Some had been living here all their lives, and others had just moved here to study. This reflected in the routes they would take, daily or occasionally. In a calm and relaxed atmosphere, all participants had input to the route that was mapped out. It turned out to be a tour, going out from the centre of Antwerp towards the harbor, and coming back in again at the ‘Linkeroever’ (Left-bank in Flemish). Helen Carnac touched on the subject of individual collecting: picking up things or taking photographs. Both can focus on marks left by man, familiar or unfamiliar, as a documentation of time. Armed with cameras and collecting bags the students set out on their walk.

It was obvious from the start, that every student had a different approach to documenting the walk. Some had been collecting found objects since childhood, while others were new to the phenomenon. Some preferred to take pictures, while others knew exactly what to pick up and what not. It was interesting how some students instinctively pointed out ‘collectables’ for others.

Back in the atelier, all the collections were laid out individually, and photographs were uploaded onto the computer, in order to get a complete view of what went on during the walk. In the end, the tour was done in two days and part of the route had been altered which was quickly mapped out. Helen Carnac discussed with the participants how they could bring a system into their finds. How would they document their own route as an individual (even though it is the same route as everyone else’s)? The participants were asked, to go back to the spot, where a mark of interest was found or photographed. How could understanding of it be developed? How can marks be translated into making a piece or pieces? With these (remarks and) questions the workshop postponed for one week, leaving the participants to work on their own.

The workshop restarted, after the participants had spent time thinking and working individually, on the previous findings. Every student had a moment to show which system they had found to document and translate their collection and photographs into work. Some literally took outlines of their finds to base their work on. Others worked with their entire collection of found objects. Overall, everyone managed to create a system and use it.

With these interesting and very different outcomes, it was time to think of a way to present them. How can these different collections represent the single route they are coming from? Under Helen Carnacs’ gentle curative guidance, an exhibition started to take shape. Since the photographs really helped recreating a visual memory, they were used as a chronological guide of the communal walk. To mimic a timeline, a long piece of horizontal string was pinned to the wall to hold the photographs. At relevant places on the string, vertical strings were attached to lead to the individual systemized collections, photographs and work. Occasionally words were added, marking the intimacy of the walk in Antwerp.

- Broes van Itterson - 


"What you see displayed here is a visual and written document of our original walks. The objects displayed in this circle are some that were found on the walks, there is a map detailing our journeys, images remembered by the group in words remembered 11 days after the walks were taken and a selection of all our images in a line on the wall, beginning at this end where we began on Sint-Jozefstraat. The students have connected their individual projects to an image on the line of the place that they chose to go back to and reflect on. This project is a formative part of the jewellery students’ studies, whilst it does not explicitly connect with what we may think of as jewellery, it is intended to encourage thinking around ideas such as collecting data, research, mark-making, the identity of a place, individuals and place and how we experience place by being in it, on our feet". 

- Helen Carnac -
-2016-2016

Dates and price

Dates: 3rd and 4th March, 15th and 16th March 2011 from 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.
Duration: 32 hours
Price: EUR 200 (not incl. Materials)
during the workshop .
during the workshop

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during the workshop .
during the workshop

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presentation of the workshop.
presentation of the workshop

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street jewellery by Saskia Van der Gucht.
street jewellery by Saskia Van der Gucht

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experiments for a brooch by Cleo Loos.
experiments for a brooch by Cleo Loos

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presentation of the workshop.
presentation of the workshop

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detail of the presentation.
detail of the presentation

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detail of the presentation.
detail of the presentation

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