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Walk the Talk

Exhibition  /  28 Jun 2014  -  10 Aug 2014
Published: 19.06.2014
Ubi Gallery
Management:
Machtelt Schelling
Alice Bo-wen Chang. Brooch: Untitled, 2013. Silver, gold-plated copper, aluminum. Collection: Body Space/bodyscape and Luminous Windows. Alice Bo-wen Chang
Brooch: Untitled, 2013
Silver, gold-plated copper, aluminum
Collection: Body Space/bodyscape and Luminous Windows
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.

Intro
Ubi Gallery presents a large group exhibition with 15 different lecturers and professors from the metal and jewellery departments from all over China. These leading figures in jewellery education have their own studios and will share their recent work.

Artist list

Alice Bo-wen Chang, Chungang Wang (Steven), Hao Hu, Jun Hu, Kai Ren, Kezhen Wang (Zep), Shannon Guo, Shuyu Wu (Sue), Xiaoli Ning, Xiao Liu, Xian’ou iI (Michelle), Xiaoxin Wang, Xinzi Song (Natalie), Yi Zhao, Zhenghong Wang
Ubi Gallery is happy to present a large group exhibition with 15 different lecturers and professors from the metal and jewellery departments from all over China. These leading figures in jewellery education have their own studios and will share their recent work with you. It might come as no surprise that the variety of the work is great and that they are all role models for the younger generation. Each in their own special way. We see narrative work, more based on a traditional visual language, we see pieces were the wearability was leading, we see installations and more conceptual work. Most of them had followed part of their education abroad or are through their contacts at the university very well aware of the international developments. At the same time everyone developped their own identity and you are invited to look deeper than the surface of cultural variety and experience what these works are about. The leading principle in this exhibition is to share with you the recent work of a selection of the educators in China. For the future generation it is essential to have strong and passionate teachers, who walk the talk by putting in practice what they communicate.

Alice Bo-wen Chang
Course director of Jewellery Design and Architecture Design
Academy of International Visual Arts Shanghai (AIVA)
Alice Bo-wen Chang is a designer who was trained as an architect in Taiwan and in the United States. She also studied jewellery designing in England. Currently Alice is course director of AIVA (Academy of International Visual Arts) in Shanghai. Alice’s work is playful; it’s an experiment with different metals, plastic and techniques and craft skills. Notice the influence of architectural elements in her work. It reminds us of squares, floor plans, structures and patterns in the urban space. She uses the body as a virtual landscape, which she explores like an architect, positioning her jewellery as valuable elements in this lively environment.

Chungang Wang (Steven)
Professor
Fine Arts School of Hangzhou Normal University
Steven Wang has been based in the United States, quite a large part of his professional career. In 2012 he returned to China, to Hangzhou where he is currently teaching. In his works, presented at Ubi Gallery, his fascination for natural motives catches the eye. Steven feels that the underlining rules for beauty, peace and proportion are already there, open for us to discover. He has a tremendous joy in playing with colours, shapes and materials to create his jewellery and sharing his inspiration with others.

Hao Hu
Lecturer of Guangzhou Academy of Fine Arts
Hao Hu is very interested in seeing how the audience influences the art. In her case, to see how the wearer of the jewellery can be involved in the outcome of the final piece. She organises workshops with participants and uses the results in her own collection. She is fascinated by the use of daily materials such as plastic instead of metals and precious stones. She noticed that these materials give her more freedom to play with shapes and colours and the affordability gives the pieces a different platform.

Jun Hu
Lecturer of Beijing Institute of Fashion Technology
Hu Jun is a lecturer at the Beijing Institute of Fashion Technology. He is trained as a silversmith and which evident in his three-dimensional and technical approach of the material.In his recent collection, the human body is point of focus. We see different parts of the body enlarged in metal constructions, with a huge variety of finishing techniques. From shiny gold leaves, silver inlaid pieces to the rougher surface on Japanese lacquer. Hu Jun is able to make sculptural movements on the small surface of a brooch and by doing this he gives the pieces a strong physical energy.Not all bodies are whole; sometimes we see fractures. For Hu Jun those fractures are symbols for the deep division between cultures and the impossibility to overcome differences in thinking.

Kai Ren
Lecturer of jewellery department, Gemmological institute, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan
Ren Kai has been in a teaching position for two years now at the University of Wuhan. It changed him deeply and inspired him to create the Campus Collection. The dance of the the chairs are a tribute to the lively society of the Campus.
The chairs play with the concepts of looking up and looking down, being a teacher or a student,being on a platform, or sitting to learn; or sitting and dreaming away.

Kezhen Wang
Director of metalsmith department, Nanjing University of the Arts

Shannon Guo
Professor of the jewellery design department, Shanghai Univeristy
In all her work ShannonGuo is very connected to her rootsin all her works. She is passionate about the skills of old crafts. She loves the peaceful scenes of traditional Chinese paintings – but at the same time she longs for a more contemporary visual approach. Changes can be made by taking small steps, but in a forward direction. In her work you can read the tribute to landscapes, flowers, plants and stones. Her work is made of silver and pearls, but is not always so comfortable to wear as it seems at first sight. According to Shannon, it is not about the material that makes a piece contemporary or not. The question is in which material can you express yourself best as an artist.

Shuyu Wu (Sue)
Lecturer of jewellery department, Gemmological Institute, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan
Sue returned to China in May 2014, after a three-year stay in the United States. Her recent works reflect on that specific time, where cross-cultural experiences caused her joy, pain, shock, frustration and happiness about understanding and learning. Her work Rubber is the result of her arrival in America, where she suddenly noticed that simple things she had learned could cause misunderstanding and how strong the desire can be to articulate yourself in a language that is not your own.
The two rings in the exhibition are part of the ‘Un-Common Thread’ collection, where Sue was inspired by a traditional Chinese decorative art. She explores the possibility of rejuvenating the old technique of knotting with contemporary aesthetics and creative use of materials.

Xiaoli Ning
Lecturer of the design department, Fine Arts School of Hangzhou Normal University
NingXiaoli studied at the famous China Academy of Fine Arts in Hangzhou. One of the main influences of her work are the floral motives who have their foundation in ancient Chinese jewellery. Every flower has its inner spirit and can metaphor a person’s character. The common ground for flowers are the fragile presence, combined with proudness, beauty and power to withstand all kinds of weather. NingXiaoli tries to catch the moment the beauty of the flower is almost fading away. It gives you even more desire to live.

Xiao Liu
Lecturer of jewellery design department, China Central Academy of Fine Arts, Beijing
The material Liu Xiao uses for his work are dust and grains – very common and unattractive. He questions the status of material by using it. And at the same time he is able to transform this material into something else, by repetitive and ritual movements – which have the appearance of raw crystal stone. The dirty and ephemeral substance changed into something precious and durable. This working process to him is related to the discipline of Zen. By daily practice withrepetitive and ritual movements, you can cultivate yourself as a human being and change into something more precious and durable.

Xian’ou Ni (Michelle)
Lecturer of The China Academy of Fine Arts, Hangzhou
In her new work,Michelle Xian’ou Ni combined traditional Chineselandscape painting with the more abstract approach of her jewellery. She used the old ceramic shards to give them a second life and added a third dimension to the painting of the shard. The continuation between old and new, between 2 and 3 dimensions, between spiritual meaning and factual matters are of the essence and the core of her work.

Xiaoxin Wang
Lecturer of the Department of Art and Crafts at Tsinghua University, Academy of Arts & Design, Beijing
The pieces made by professor Wang are based on Chinese philosophy. It is about endless civilization or the circle of life. Although the differences in lifestyle between civilizations seem to be reducing nowadays, it doesn’t mean conflicts will be eliminated. Maybe all people look the same, but their thoughts and eyes are pointing in different directions. Philosophy only lives through the life of people; they are the carrier of philosophy. By examining what they do and how they live together, you can learn what their heart is about. Life is all about the balance between what brings together and gives variety, about being the same and being different.

Xinzi Song (Natalie)
International Centre Jewellery Program Course Leader, Beijing Institute of Fashion Technology
Natalie Xinzi Song is Chinese and studied at the Beijing Institute of Fashion Technology. She got her master degree in Jewellery in Birmingham (UK). She won several awards with her work and exhibited in Munich, Birmingham, Italy and Japan and is currently working as a teacher at the BIFT.
Natalie works mainly with silicone and tries to learn all about the ins and outs of this material. She is able to create innovative forms and textures with the material. By the repetition of simple elements she turns complex patterns and structures into colourful jewellery, bowls, vases and objects. In her recent works she made a temporarily switch to silverwork. Each ring is a construction of two or three simple rings and curved in a random way. The elegant circles and curves of the ring fit the movement of the fingers and are in a nice contrast with the pure colour and hardness of the silver.

Yi Zhao
Lecturer of Beijing Institute of Fashion technology
Zhao Yi’s recent work is quite personal. Her experiences as a mother and the worries she had when she discovered the heart disease of her young daughter were intense. And we can see the results in her pieces.
The presentation of the heart shape in her work is very literal and direct. The materials are a bit more complex, with a mix of horns, threads and elements of a tree. Beauty, passion and enthusiasm about being a mother are stronger than the worries and the difficult times, the pieces seem to tell. But in her work she expresses at the same time that motherhood is more than pink happy days.

Zhenghong Wang
Professor of the college of Public Art, The China Academy of Art, Hangzhou
The collection ‘wearable sculpture’ rests on the boundaries between jewellery and sculpture. The pieces are not just art works, nor just decoration. The wearer will convey his body language by wearing the local landscape and taking over the position of nature. Professor Wang presents her work on self made large stone hills, where the silver pieces are sacred additions. Most of her pieces have moveable parts and mirrors, to be able to adjust to the right position on the body and to reflect on its surroundings.

Remarks

Opening: June 28th, 16:00-18:00
Several artists will be there to give a small presentation to introduce their work to you. They are happy to meet you so feel free to join them.

Opening hours: 11:30 - 18:30
Zhenghong Wang. Brooch: Bodies Landscape, 2013. Silver. Zhenghong Wang
Brooch: Bodies Landscape, 2013
Silver
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Alice Bo-wen Chang. Brooch: Untitled, 2013. Silver, gold-plated copper, aluminum. Collection: Body Space/bodyscape and Luminous Windows. Alice Bo-wen Chang
Brooch: Untitled, 2013
Silver, gold-plated copper, aluminum
Collection: Body Space/bodyscape and Luminous Windows
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Alice Bo-wen Chang. Brooch: Untitled, 2013. Silver, gold-plated copper, aluminum. Collection: Body Space/bodyscape and Luminous Windows. Alice Bo-wen Chang
Brooch: Untitled, 2013
Silver, gold-plated copper, aluminum
Collection: Body Space/bodyscape and Luminous Windows
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Chungang Wang (Steven). Brooch: Untitled, 2013. Silver, enamel, diamond, yellow sapphire. Chungang Wang (Steven)
Brooch: Untitled, 2013
Silver, enamel, diamond, yellow sapphire
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Chungang Wang (Steven). Ring: Untitled, 2013. Silver, enamel, diamond, yellow sapphire. Chungang Wang (Steven)
Ring: Untitled, 2013
Silver, enamel, diamond, yellow sapphire
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Hao Hu. Necklace: Untitled, 2013. Acrylic, silver. Collection: ‘All things in nature’. Hao Hu
Necklace: Untitled, 2013
Acrylic, silver
Collection: ‘All things in nature’
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Jun Hu. Brooch: Human body, 2013. Bronze, silver, gold leaf, steel wire, Japanese lacquer. Jun Hu
Brooch: Human body, 2013
Bronze, silver, gold leaf, steel wire, Japanese lacquer
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Jun Hu. Brooch: Human body, 2013. Bronze, silver, gold leaf, steel wire, Japanese lacquer. Jun Hu
Brooch: Human body, 2013
Bronze, silver, gold leaf, steel wire, Japanese lacquer
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Jun Hu. Brooch: Human body, 2013. Bronze, silver, gold leaf, steel wire, Japanese lacquer. Jun Hu
Brooch: Human body, 2013
Bronze, silver, gold leaf, steel wire, Japanese lacquer
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Kai Ren. Piece: Untitled, 2013. Campus, titanium and silver. Kai Ren
Piece: Untitled, 2013
Campus, titanium and silver
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Kezhen Wang. Piece: Untitled. Kezhen, WangPiece: Untitled. Kezhen Wang
Piece: Untitled


Kezhen, Wang
Piece: Untitled

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Kezhen Wang. Piece: Untitled. Kezhen, WangPieces: Untitled. Kezhen Wang
Piece: Untitled


Kezhen, Wang
Pieces: Untitled

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Shannon Guo. Brooch: Untitled, 2014. Silver, stone, pearl. Shannon Guo
Brooch: Untitled, 2014
Silver, stone, pearl
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Shannon Guo. Piece: Untitled, 2014. Silver, stone, pearl. Shannon Guo
Piece: Untitled, 2014
Silver, stone, pearl
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Shuyu Wu (Sue). Piece: Blooming, 2013. Nylon strings, sterling silver, dye. Shuyu Wu (Sue)
Piece: Blooming, 2013
Nylon strings, sterling silver, dye
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Shuyu Wu (Sue). Brooch: A rubber, 2013. Eraser, nickel silver. Shuyu Wu (Sue)
Brooch: A rubber, 2013
Eraser, nickel silver
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Shuyu Wu (Sue). Brooch: A rubber, 2013. Eraser, nickel silver. Shuyu Wu (Sue)
Brooch: A rubber, 2013
Eraser, nickel silver
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Xiaoli Ning. Piece: Untitled, 2013. Silver, ceramic. Xiaoli Ning
Piece: Untitled, 2013
Silver, ceramic
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Xiaoli Ning. Piece: Untitled, 2013. Silver, ceramic. Xiaoli Ning
Piece: Untitled, 2013
Silver, ceramic
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Xiao Liu. Brooch: The Rice Stone, 2013. Grain, dust, silver. Xiao Liu
Brooch: The Rice Stone, 2013
Grain, dust, silver
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Xiao Liu. Brooch: The Rice Stone, 2013. Grain, dust, silver. Xiao Liu
Brooch: The Rice Stone, 2013
Grain, dust, silver
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Xiao Liu. Brooch: The Rice Stone, 2013. Grain, dust, silver. Xiao Liu
Brooch: The Rice Stone, 2013
Grain, dust, silver
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Xian’ou Ni (Michelle). Necklace: Untitled, 2013. Ceramic, silver, pearl, resin, coral, shell, paper, crystal, aquamarine, rhodochrosite, lacquer, dioptase, tourmaline, stainless steel. Collection: Empty Cities. Xian’ou Ni (Michelle)
Necklace: Untitled, 2013
Ceramic, silver, pearl, resin, coral, shell, paper, crystal, aquamarine, rhodochrosite, lacquer, dioptase, tourmaline, stainless steel
Collection: Empty Cities
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Xian’ou Ni (Michelle). Necklace: Untitled, 2013. Ceramic, silver, pearl, resin, coral, shell, paper, crystal, aquamarine, rhodochrosite, lacquer, dioptase, tourmaline, stainless steel. Collection: Empty Cities. Xian’ou Ni (Michelle)
Necklace: Untitled, 2013
Ceramic, silver, pearl, resin, coral, shell, paper, crystal, aquamarine, rhodochrosite, lacquer, dioptase, tourmaline, stainless steel
Collection: Empty Cities
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Xian’ou Ni (Michelle). Brooch: Untitled, 2013. Ceramic, silver, pearl, resin, coral, shell, paper, crystal, aquamarine, rhodochrosite, lacquer, dioptase, tourmaline, stainless steel. Collection: Empty Cities. Xian’ou Ni (Michelle)
Brooch: Untitled, 2013
Ceramic, silver, pearl, resin, coral, shell, paper, crystal, aquamarine, rhodochrosite, lacquer, dioptase, tourmaline, stainless steel
Collection: Empty Cities
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Xiaoxin Wang. Brooch: Untitled, 2013. Copper, gold, 3D printing. Xiaoxin Wang
Brooch: Untitled, 2013
Copper, gold, 3D printing
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Xiaoxin Wang. Ring: Untitled, 2013. Copper, gold, 3D printing. Xiaoxin Wang
Ring: Untitled, 2013
Copper, gold, 3D printing
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Xinzi Song (Natalie). Ring: Curved Rings, 2014. Silver. Xinzi Song (Natalie)
Ring: Curved Rings, 2014
Silver
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Yi Zhao. Necklace: Untitled, 2013. Silver, wood, horn thread. Yi Zhao
Necklace: Untitled, 2013
Silver, wood, horn thread
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Zhenghong Wang. Piece: Body as Landscape, 2012-2013. Metal, mirror, stones, 925 sliver.. 8 x 10 x 10 cm. From series: Body as Landscape. Zhenghong Wang
Piece: Body as Landscape, 2012-2013
Metal, mirror, stones, 925 sliver.
8 x 10 x 10 cm
From series: Body as Landscape
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Zhenghong Wang. Piece: Bodies Landscape, 2013. Silver. Zhenghong Wang
Piece: Bodies Landscape, 2013
Silver
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Zhenghong Wang. Piece: Bodies Landscape, 2013. Silver. Zhenghong Wang
Piece: Bodies Landscape, 2013
Silver
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
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