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Talking Face to Face. Review of the Jewellery Week in Munich 2020. Part 1/2

Published: 30.03.2020
Carolin Denter Carolin Denter
Author:
Carolin Denter
Edited by:
Klimt02
Edited at:
Barcelona
Edited on:
2020
.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.

Intro
Due to COVID-19, the Jewellery Week in Munich was this year reduced to its core: it felt like the beginnings of Schmuck some years ago said many. From about 63 exhibitions still on, I visited 13 to analyze the mood, see some good works and talk with the artists.

This is the first out of two parts of my review in which I talk about 6 of these exhibitions.
I spent two intensive days in Munich, where I put together a tight program of almost 63 exhibitions and events. Originally I have been planning to visit the fair and some exhibitions in Munich, spread over 4 days. But due to the cancellation of many events, I had to change plans day by day and leave Munich earlier as expected: In total, I visited 13 exhibitions and had some intensive discussions. In the following, I would like to share some personal impressions. 


Please touch all my pieces. And then wash your hands. 
The first exhibition on my list was the show Oval by Johee Han. The exhibition room was a quiet, beautiful and bright atelier space with an open fireplace. The Presentation was simple on styrofoam tables, with enough space to evaluate all pieces. While my visit, few people have been there. As Johee said, it was very quiet and little public traffic, but therefore she had time to talk with the people extensively. She said she didn't expect many people, but it's important for herself, to show what she made and to reward herself for the hard work she put in the development of her new collection.


Exhibition view of Oval by Johee Han.


Exhibition view of Oval by Johee Han.


Exhibition view of Oval by Johee Han.


In her series Oval, the Munich based artist shows pieces made of eggshells and silicone. The title of her work refers to the natural form of the egg, which she breaks up and reassembles. Her pieces surprised me:

When you first see them, you think of materials like cork or even plastic. Thanks to Johee's exuberant invitation to touch, play with and wear her pieces, the objects quickly became something completely different. Flexible, soft silicone bodies and shapes that shimmer in the light, surprisingly changing their shape on the human body and completely losing the geometry they had on the tables that serve as presentation surfaces. Straight lines no longer exist. 


Exhibition view of Oval by Johee Han.


Exhibition view of Oval by Johee Han.


Johee Han wearing some of her flexible brooches to demonstrate how they change their shape.


For her, the most important reason to exhibit at this year's Jewellery week, was to receive feedback and gain inspiration for her new series, on which she starts working now.


Aluminium Galore and Other Disasters...
The second exhibition that Friday was titled Aluminium Galore and other Disasters by Peter Vermandere.
Celebrating his 10th anniversary of exhibitions at the Jewellery Week Munich, he presented experimental and playful objects, sculptures and jewellery.


Exhibition view of Aluminium Galore and Other Disasters by Peter Vermandere.


The rooms of Gierke-Berr's studio are located in a quiet backyard and house the exhibits like a treasure trove. 
The exhibition layout is cosy and inviting, with many oriental carpets, a seating area with guitar, pleasant music, fresh flowers, and indirect light. Peter invited me to examine his pieces first, an explanation follows after the first impressions. The artist seems visibly relaxed, although, as he says, he has only a few visitors these days. Nevertheless, he is happy, he has developed a new series and casting methods, has many plans for future series and workshops. He uses the time productively and takes a lot of time to talk to his visitors. There was even a sale made. 

He was surprised to find out together with the owner of the rooms, that he has been exhibiting in Munich for 10 years now, for him Munich is something special, but he is now ready to try something new. 


Exhibition view of Aluminium Galore and Other Disasters by Peter Vermandere.


Exhibition view of Aluminium Galore and Other Disasters by Peter Vermandere.


My own mood is already rising noticeably with this second exhibition. The confidence, the good mood of the artists, the good works I see, and the courage to face the same circumstances motivate me to continue my program, although I have to change program points again and again because every hour new updates on health safety in Munich are issued and more and more exhibitions and museums close early.


Relaxing place at Aluminium Galore and other Disasters, for the artist and visitors.


I say goodbye to Peter, who assures me that this jewellery week was good for him, he is proud to show his work and every guest counts.


Three exhibitions in two galleries
The next stop on my way is a well-known address for all jewellery lovers in Munich, Galerie Bíro. Kinga and Olga Zobel organized, as in the last years, different shows: one in the rooms of Galerie Bíro, and one next door at Galerie Jordanow. 


Exhibition view of Bussi Buhs and Petra Zimmermann at Galerie Bíro.


Exhibition view of Bussi Buhs and Petra Zimmermann at Galerie Bíro.


I begin in the original rooms of Galerie Biro, to see the exhibition of Bussi Bühs and Petra Zimmermann, both known for their use of Plastic. I am lucky, just minutes before me Ruudt Peters and his Partner enter the Gallery, and Kinga is in the best mood to explain to us everything about the show and the works. 

While she is giving us a detailed tour through the gallery, she invites us to admire, touch and see the pieces. Entering the rooms, i was not sure about my general interest in the works. But here it shows, that Kinga Zobel knows how to do her job. As she is talking passionately about the pieces, points out highlights and lets us explore her favorites, I feel more and more excited about them. 


Exhibition view of Bussi Buhs and Petra Zimmermann at Galerie Bíro with a bracelet by Bussi Buhs.


Exhibition view of Bussi Buhs and Petra Zimmermann at Galerie Bíro.


Bussi Bühs is an impressing artist: After studying painting at the Staatliche Akademie der Bildenden Künste in Karlsruhe, she undertook her first experiments with plastics while studying chemistry. 1971-2005 she took over the establishment and management of the plastics workshop at the State Academy of Fine Arts in Munich where she lives. 


Exhibition view of Bussi Buhs and Petra Zimmermann at Galerie Bíro with a brooch by Bussi Buhs.


On the other hand, Petra Zimmermann occupies a unique position among the emerging contemporary jewellery artists: she shares their exciting approach to the subject of jewellery and the quotable adoption of the (Pop) culture label for defining the auteur jewellery concept; in which she succeeds, this time through historical reference. The artist draws on past encounters with costume jewellery from the previous century for her rings, bracelets and brooches. Comprised of bright, colourful synthetic forms these objects receive a framework, in which their artificial appearance contrasts with the dusty splendour of the historic costume jewellery. 
In her latest series of works, the artist uses mass media images of models, floral motifs, architecture and design objects, which broaden her scope of cultural and social interpretations. 


Exhibition view of Bussi Buhs and Petra Zimmermann at Galerie Bíro with objects from Petra Zimmermann.


Exhibition view of Bussi Buhs and Petra Zimmermann at Galerie Bíro with objects from Petra Zimmermann.


Leaving Kinga and Galerie Bïro, I entered Galerie Jordanow, to meet Artist Niklas Link and Olga Zobel to see Characters by Niklas Link and The Highly Honoured.  

The premises are less crowded than in the neighboring rooms, but the exhibition titles were promising. Niklas Links works, all of them various self-portraits, made of silver, lacquer and various synthetic stones, looking towards you, impaled on grey styrofoam plates and heads. The circular arrangement has something ritualistic about it. The works are technically perfectly worked out and especially his foldable, two-dimensional rings, which unfold when worn, are funny contemporaries. I also see some red dots, so it seems that one or the other is sold. All in all, I like the simplicity and clarity of the pieces and even if the presentation is not completely convincing for me I am happy about Olga Zobel's explanations and a lively discussion that develops afterward. 


Exhibition view of Characters by Niklas Link.


Exhibition view of Characters by Niklas Link.


Exhibition view of Characters by Niklas Link.


In the adjoining room, we find the exhibition The Highly Honoured with works by Robert Baines, Kadri Mälk and Lisa Walker. The works feel familiar to me, it seems I looked at them many times already during my studies, or maybe the works just live up to the title and the highly honoured are on "everyone's lips".


Exhibition view of The Highly Honoured at Galerie Jordanow.


Exhibition view of The Highly Honoured at Galerie Jordanow with a Necklace by Lisa Walker.


Exhibition view of The Highly Honoured at Galerie Jordanow with a necklace of Robert Baines.


Exhibition view of The Highly Honoured at Galerie Jordanow with works of Kadri Mälk.


Nordic Coolness and Heavy Metal
After a long walk through the gardens of Munich, I finally get to see the Sharing is Caring Exhibition in the old Orangerie, situated in the English garden. Four university programs in metal art, show their yearlong cooperation. This collaboration has born exchange opportunities for students and teachers, as they are only a few schools worldwide who teach blacksmithing and metalworks in relation with jewellery. The pieces on show were made from Karl Hallberg, Prof. Heiner Zimmermann, Tobias Birgersson from the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, Prof. Rick Smith from Southern Illinois University, USA, Urmas Lüüs, Eve Margus-Villems, Piret Hirv and Nils Hint from the Estonian Academy of Arts and finally the Hereford College of Arts, GB: Dr. John Grayson, Ambrose Burne. 

The heavy metalworkd, the contrast of heavy material and floating forms, small jewellery, big objects, the black material, and the white room. Big Portraits on the wall, painful to watch. The first impression was stunning, and the works really bold. 


Exhibition view of Sharing is Caring.


Exhibition view of Sharing is Caring.


Exhibition view of Sharing is Caring.


Exhibition view of Sharing is Caring.


Exhibition view of Sharing is Caring.



This was the first part of a two parts review of the Jewellery Week in Munich 2020. 
 

About the author

Carolin Denter completed her training as Goldsmith at Master School for Craftsmen in Kaiserslautern in 2013. From 2015 to 2016 she made an Internship as Content Manager at Klimt02 in Barcelona. In 2017 she graduated as Bachelor of Fine Arts in Gemstone and Jewellery at the University of Applied Science Trier, Campus Idar-Oberstein. After her graduation, she worked as Assistance at Campus Idar-Oberstein in the Gemstone and Jewellery Departement till the end of 2019. Since 2020 she is Digital Account Manager at Klimt02. 
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