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Mathematics Now Influences My Making Process. Ana Margarida Carvalho interviewed by Klimt02

Interview  /  Artists
Published: 17.06.2020
Ana Margarida Carvalho Ana Margarida Carvalho
Author:
Klimt02
Edited by:
Klimt02
Edited at:
Barcelona
Edited on:
2020
Ana Margarida Carvalho. Brooch: Sheep, 2020. Perspex, paint, alcohol ink, epoxy, stainless steel.. 7 x 6.2 x 1.2 cm. Photo by: Ana Margarida Carvalho. From series: Play in Case of Emergency. Ana Margarida Carvalho
Brooch: Sheep, 2020
Perspex, paint, alcohol ink, epoxy, stainless steel.
7 x 6.2 x 1.2 cm
Photo by: Ana Margarida Carvalho
From series: Play in Case of Emergency
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.

Intro
As an artist I never stopped learning and exploring. Contemporary Jewellery allows me to learn and explore techniques in a traditional way but also spin and mix it all together. A bit like a mad scientist in a way. Some told me that all my fields of study are too much. I don’t agree. It helps to grow my world. I don’t always know how or if it will translate into my work, but it’s there and you never know… Another thing that I like is that you define your own limits when creating in your studio. All materials are allowed, all ideas are allowed. It’s very freeing.
Tell us about your background. What were your first influences to be creative and become an artist and what has drawn you to contemporary jewellery?
I grew in a family where almost everyone had some sort of artistic hobbies in crafts, forging, sculpting, painting and music. It was part of everyday life. In my household, my parents took me to all sorts of concerts, shows and museums. We read a lot, had discussions about history, science, current events and travelled abroad.
 
On a more personal level, I have a background in art and science.
I have been drawing since I can remember. Also, I went to a non-traditional school when I was 5, where we were pushed to explore everything from science to arts. I studied piano and arts in high school, even though I was always attracted to sciences and began being interested in sculpture. After being an AFS student in Norway, I also started to have private singing lessons and to sing in choirs. Around that time, I started to see Ar.Co advertising on newspapers and thinking that I wanted to do jewellery. I didn’t know why, I just felt attracted to it. I had pierced my ears at 12. I cherished my jewels, but I wasn’t much of a wearer. I was more of a tomboy.
 
Later I went on to study mathematics in university and having private singing classes. I graduated in Operational Research, a field of mathematics which now influences my making process. After graduating, I worked a few years as a teacher in my field. I kept singing in a choir, but I felt something was missing, so I decided to study jewellery.
 
I enrolled in Ar.Co without really knowing about Art Jewellery, but I felt at home from week one. The school philosophy made the learning process very fulfilling. It was a very busy time, with a demanding professional life and concerts, but I even managed to include extra drawing night classes to the mix. I went on to study for 3 months in Hiko Mizuno College of jewellery. Japanese culture is an attraction of mine and also took me a little bit away from the European Art Jewellery world, but also allowed me to experience another approach to it. It also allowed me to learn some techniques from the masters.
 
As an artist I never stopped learning and exploring.
Contemporary Jewellery allows me to learn and explore techniques in a traditional way but also spin and mix it all together. A bit like a mad scientist in a way. Some told me that all my fields of study are too much. I don’t agree. It helps to grow my world. I don’t always know how or if it will translate into my work, but it’s there and you never know…
Another thing that I like is that you define your own limits when creating in your studio. All materials are allowed, all ideas are allowed. It’s very freeing.


Brooch: Zebra, 2020, Perspex, paint, alcohol ink, epoxy, stainless steel., 8.1 x 5.5 x 1.2 cm, Photo by: Ana Margarida Carvalho


How important is networking for you in your professional practice and what are your preferred tools for this?
Networking is important in my professional practice. I attend openings, visit galleries whenever I am in a new place. Usage of online tools to promote my work comes very easy, although very time consuming to me. Lately, I also have invested in international fairs.
 

What are your general thoughts on the contemporary jewellery world, (education, market, development...), where do you see chances and where are dead ends?
Contemporary Jewellery is still a niche field with a growing potential, even though I think the number of creators grew exponentially since I started studying it. Internet is helping connecting people interested in it, educating the public and promoting this field.
I think more people are curious about it, even in a country like Portugal. Of course, all it’s baby steps here.
 

Brooch: Bee, 2020, Perspex, paint, alcohol ink, epoxy, stainless steel., 5 x 8.8 x 1 cm, Photo by: Ana Margarida Carvalho


Thinking about your career, what role do technology and the digital play in your artistic development & communication?
Technology and digital have played an important part in my artistic development and communication. First, with my background, as I came later in life into the jewellery world, it was a way to upgrade my knowledge of the field when I was still a student. I keep doing it to research. It is also an obvious way to promote my work. On the other hand, I find that technology and digital are another set of tools in my studio. If I have to formalise my ideas, I use it.
 
 
How has your work changed over the past few years and what are you excited about these days?
Formally, I had a strong need to go from 2D to 3D, and now I simply don’t think about it.
I also have become more attentive to the happy accidents.
 
My work has been become lighter in terms of intent. Even though I still keep some control, I am no longer so interested in the message within my work. Funnily, I think it has now a more precise and personal content.

These days, I am eager to learn new things, growing my “tool box”, and let my work flow.
Appreciate APPRECIATE