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My Work has Developed into Something More Personal. Interview with Alex Kinsley Vey by Klimt02

Interview
Published: 21.05.2021
Alex Kinsley Vey Alex Kinsley Vey
Author:
Klimt02
Edited by:
Klimt02
Edited at:
Barcelona
Edited on:
2021
Alex Kinsley Vey. Brooch: Industrial Obelisk, 2020. Steel, spray paint, 24k gold, sterling silver.. 8 x 2 x 1 cm. From series: Iron Indentity. Unique piece.. Alex Kinsley Vey
Brooch: Industrial Obelisk, 2020
Steel, spray paint, 24k gold, sterling silver.
8 x 2 x 1 cm
From series: Iron Indentity
Unique piece.
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.

Intro
Networking is important in not just my practice, but I think in most areas of life. Humans are social creatures and for better or worse we thrive on those connections. My preferred tool for this is a cold pint of beer and jovial conversation.
Tell us about your background. What were your first influences to be creative and become an artist and what has drawn you to contemporary jewellery?
I come from a family of goldsmiths, my grandfather, and uncles, as well as my parents were all involved in the trade. My early influences to being creative was building and painting miniature models when I was a teenager, along with reading Heavy Metal Magazine and falling in love with the Sci-Fi & Fantasy illustrations inside. Philippe Druillet, Jean Giraud, & John Blanche being some of my favourites.
 Once that inspiration had built it naturally bubbled out into the dominant form of expression I had been exposed to growing up, jewellery.
 

How important is networking for you in your professional practice and what are your preferred tools for this?
Networking is important in not just my practice, but I think in most areas of life. Humans are social creatures and for better or worse we thrive on those connections. My preferred tool for this is a cold pint of beer and jovial conversation.
 

Thinking about your career, what role do technology and the digital play in your artistic development & communication?
For me, it's more behind the scenes than upfront. I use things with CAD to design or ‘sketch’ out some of my work and I make use of industrial CNC laser cutting for the larger pieces. But I’m still a bit of a traditionalist otherwise, I prefer always to see the work in person. Virtual is better than nothing but, to me, I would still rather present, for example, in person at an exhibition or fair.
 

How has your work changed over the past few years and what are you excited about these days?
My work has developed into something more personal with my Iron Identity series, investigating my place of birth and the feelings growing up there. Recently I have been more interested in the ideas of ‘faded glory’ and just entropy in a more general sense, so I have been looking at a more universal representation of that thread.
 
Appreciate APPRECIATE