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You Have to be Aware Not to Lose Your Unique Signature as a Designer. Interview with Duo Wonder by Klimt02

Interview  /  Artists
Published: 01.07.2021
Duo Wonder  Duo Wonder 
Author:
Klimt02
Edited by:
Klimt02
Edited at:
Barcelona
Edited on:
2021
duo Wonder. Brooch: Cyclographics, 2021. Polyamide, polyester embroidery on recycled surface, magnet.. 7.5 x 7.5 x 0.7 cm. Photo by: duo Wonder. From series: Cyclographics. Unique piece. duo Wonder
Brooch: Cyclographics, 2021
Polyamide, polyester embroidery on recycled surface, magnet.
7.5 x 7.5 x 0.7 cm
Photo by: duo Wonder
From series: Cyclographics
Unique piece
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.

Intro
Contemporary jewellery interestingly has no limitations regarding the use of materials. Also, it’s a very diverse landscape where traditional crafts and new techniques can be combined. This tension between low-tech and high-tech has resulted in an evolving visual language.
Tell us about your background. What were your first influences to be creative and become an artist and what has drawn you to contemporary jewellery?
Our collaboration started in the autumn of 2018 during IndoCult 2.0, a European project on Industrial Culture and the transition to a creative and/or knowledge-driven manufacturing industry. The project promoted the development of new designs inspired by the industrial character of the Limburg region. At the manufacturing lab of the former Fashion Incubator Hasselt, we experimented with an embroidery machine and laser cutter and felt a shared fascination with patterns. Our first joint series soon emerged: Cyclographics.
Inspired by the erratic lines of the Limburg cycle network, we created a set of patterns. These in turn resulted in brooches and necklaces with embroidered patterns and rotations on recycled materials.


How important is networking for you in your professional practice and what are your preferred tools for this?
Networking, physical and virtual, is essential if you want to spread your work. At first, we attended many events, which resulted in less time to actually create. Now, we’ve become more selective and we only go to events that we know will be fun. These are primarily openings, lectures, and design fairs. Unfortunately, Covid has put a stop to this. Online, our main tool is Instagram and we also follow webinars on design and sustainability.
 

What are your general thoughts on the contemporary jewellery world, (education, market, development...), where do you see chances and where are dead ends?
Contemporary jewelry interestingly has no limitations regarding the use of materials. Also, it’s a very diverse landscape where traditional crafts and new techniques can be combined. This tension between low-tech and high-tech has resulted in an evolving visual language. Certain technologies, such as design software, embroidery machines, or 3D printers, allow us to optimize our designs and have more control over the execution and reproducibility. You do have to be aware not to become superficial and lose your unique signature as a designer.


Thinking about your career, what role do technology and the digital play in your artistic development & communication?
We mainly use 2D and 3D design software and mechanical reproduction techniques such as 3D printing and embroidery. We deliberately seek out the territory between the digital, the mechanical, and the manual. The surface on which we embroider consists of recycled resources, which results in unique pieces and limited editions.


How has your work changed over the past few years and what are you excited about these days?
Our collaboration is still relatively new, but we’ve received a cultural grant from the Flemish Government to do research on the development of new patterns in a process that combines low- and high-tech. For us, this represents a unique opportunity to learn more about visual coding and parametric design. This only fuelled our obsession with the construction of patterns from grids and grid-related techniques. As true grid addicts, we work towards surfaces, forms, and patterns that we want to merge into a new series of designs.
 
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