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I See that More Students Want to Become Jewellers and the Field of the Author's Jewellery Has Been Increasing Continuously. Interview with Orsolya Kecskés by Klimt02

Interview
Published: 22.02.2021
Orsolya Kecskés Orsolya Kecskés
Author:
Klimt02
Edited by:
Klimt02
Edited at:
Barcelona
Edited on:
2021
Orsolya Kecskés. Necklace: Cold drops, 2016. Copper, enamel, hematite.. Photo by: Mária Pecsics. Orsolya Kecskés
Necklace: Cold drops, 2016
Copper, enamel, hematite.
Photo by: Mária Pecsics
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.

Intro
As for me, it runs in the family. Since my parents are a ceramic artist and a sculptor and my sister studied glass design, I was quite sure to do some creative things too, but certainly not any of these professions. […] It turned out that I really like working with metals and have never changed my mind to be a jeweler!
Tell us about your background. What were your first influences to be creative and become an artist and what has drawn you to contemporary jewellery?
As for me, it runs in the family. Since my parents are a ceramic artist and a sculptor and my sister studied glass design, I was quite sure to do some creative things too, but certainly not any of these professions. I was interested in leather design, jewellery, photography, and also film making. I didn’t know which one could be better for me but, all of a sudden, I had to fill out the application form for the Secondary School. This time my sister studied already there and I learned from her that the only balcony in the old and huge building belonged to the jewellery workshop. That was enough information to apply there... Fortunately, it turned out that I really like working with metals and have never changed my mind to be a jeweller!


How important is networking for you in your professional practice and what are your preferred tools for this?
I find it interesting, that we already had the tools to meet online before the pandemic, but we did not really take advantage of this opportunity. The online presence is such a valuable thing that allows us to meet and share our thoughts directly. It is particularly important to the community of jewellery artists living in remote parts of the world.


What are your general thoughts on the contemporary jewellery world, (education, market, development...), where do you see chances and where are dead ends?
In the field of contemporary jewellery, people - even gallery owners - have been talking about the death of the galleries for more than ten years, but I think galleries still have a very important role. Since the lockdown, we have learned how important personal contact can be among artists, buyers, collectors, gallerists. Online sales can not substitute the real venues of art. Maybe some galleries will close but not all of them and those who survive may operate differently.

As a teacher, I see that more and more students want to become jewellery designers and the field of the author's jewellery has been increasing continuously. I can not predict where this process will lead to but it will likely change a lot.


Thinking about your career, what role do technology and the digital play in your artistic development & communication?
I use mostly traditional techniques, but digital technology plays an important role mainly in my communication. I really enjoy the speed of reactions that a post can trigger.


How has your work changed over the past few years and what are you excited about these days?
Last year I won a state scholarship so, as a result, while I keep making jewels I also started to work on a new field: small enameled objects, mainly vessels. I have already bought a kiln for it. The shapes are developed from my former pieces but of course, I need to progress in raising and enameling.
 
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