Back

Jutta Klingebiel interviewed by Karin Roy Andersson

Interview  /  Artists
Published: 07.12.2021
Jutta Klingebiel Jutta Klingebiel
Author:
Karin Roy Andersson
Edited by:
Klimt02
Edited at:
Barcelona
Edited on:
2021
Jutta Klingebiel. Brooch: Sammlung, 2020. Stainless steel, enamel. Photo by: Jutta Klingebiel. Jutta Klingebiel
Brooch: Sammlung, 2020
Stainless steel, enamel
Photo by: Jutta Klingebiel
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.

Intro
I actually find a lot of inspiration in nature and its processes. It's a seemingly endless source. And you always learn something new, the deeper you go. This has always been the case for me, but right now it is so important. But honestly, I find inspiration in my perception of life itself, it can be almost anything. A random observation or maybe even a dream. Yes, dreams are good for me at the moment too.
Can you share one early memory connected to jewellery?
As an early memory, I remember that my grandparents had a small box with a beautiful ring (with two amethysts in an unusual shape) and a small perfume bottle with the elegant inscription "Opera" on it. A gift from my grandfather that he had brought back from a journey to Paris. The fragrance and the gemstones in combination with my imagination of Paris had such a precious effect on me as a child. In this context, I seem to remember that my grandmother did not attach great importance to jewellery, although she never said so.  My grandfather, on the other hand, did. There was a deep connection to the beautiful things of life.
 

What do you like most with jewellery as an artistic expression?
Jewellery as a work of art can be used in different ways. As an object that I look at in a showcase, for example, or as a piece of jewellery that I wear close to my body. It's a very immediate work of art, you can just wear it among people. It doesn't need an exhibition space or a lot of effort. What interested me early on about this form of expression: The wearer makes a connection with the piece and vice versa. Therefore each wearer often also makes a big contribution to the statement of the piece. And, of course, jewellery as a way to communicate nonverbally. A great strength of jewellery.

 
Studio of Jutta Klingebiel. Photo by Wolf Silveri.


Can you describe the working process - what is difficult, what gives you satisfaction?
First, the metal is sawn out and then primed with enamel, then kiln-fired the first time. In the next step, I apply numerous layers of pigment to the ground, much like oil painting on canvas. But each colour is fired at a different temperature and changes as it fires. As you can imagine, this requires a lot of patience, a lot of time and also skills.
The images are created during painting and several firings (some pieces are fired up to 20 times or maybe more). I have chosen an open process without preparatory sketches, etc. because I want to leave room for intuition and happenstance. Otherwise, it seems boring to me in the long run. So it comes to a process whose course I know, but never the result. If it surprises me: that gives me satisfaction. A lot can go wrong in this creative process. To be honest, lately, I have sometimes thought about using simpler techniques…


To me, the motifs in your recent work often have a melancholic and romantic air but I have also seen a picture of a necklace with two sausages. Can you tell a bit about that piece?
Melancholic and romantic in the deeper sense of romanticism as an era with its motifs, I can agree. I painted the sausages because I wanted to make something that men would like...;)  No, actually I am interested in the secret of pictures. People who look for symbolic meanings don't understand the poetry and mystery inherent in pictures, René Magritte once said. I like this sentence very much. I am actually very interested in the moment when perception becomes somewhat irritated and the seemingly familiar becomes strange. That's my path. Besides, the shape is beautiful, isn't it?


A moth that your cat brought into your studio has inspired your "Butterfly pieces" but where else do you go to look for inspiration?
I actually find a lot of inspiration in nature and its processes. It's a seemingly endless source. And you always learn something new, the deeper you go. This has always been the case for me, but right now it is so important. But honestly, I find inspiration in my perception of life itself, it can be almost anything. A random observation or maybe even a dream. Yes, dreams are good for me at the moment too.

 

About the Interviewee

Jutta Klingebiel (born in Freising, Germany), is a jewellery artist based in Rosenheim, Germany. 1995-2001 she studied gold and silversmithing at at the Akademie der Bildenden Künste in Nuremberg and since then she has been exhibiting internationally. Jutta Klingebiel is also represented at Racine Art Museum, Wisconsin, USA.
 

About the author

Karin Roy Andersson is a jewellery artist with a Master of Applied Art from HDK-Valand - Academy of Art and Design, Gothenburg, Sweden 2009. She is one of the founders of jewellery gallery Four in Gothenburg and she has been the artistic leader of the gallery since 2010. 
Karin Roy Andersson exhibits frequently around the world. In 2016 she received the Enjoia't Award - Professional category, 2018 she won the BKV Prize awarded by the Bayerische Kunstgewerbeverein in Munich, and the same year she was one of the five finalists of AJF Artist Award.
Appreciate APPRECIATE