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My latest work involves ironing, which is funny because I rarely if ever iron clothes. Louise Perrone interviewed by Klimt02

Interview  /  Artists
Published: 20.11.2018
My latest work involves ironing, which is funny because I rarely if ever iron clothes. Louise Perrone interviewed by Klimt02.
Author:
Klimt02
Edited by:
Klimt02
Edited at:
Barcelona
Edited on:
2018
Louise Perrone. Brooch: Body Mapping Brooches, 2015. Flag fabric, styrene, magnets.. 7 x 7 x 3 cm. From series: Flagged. Louise Perrone
Brooch: Body Mapping Brooches, 2015
Flag fabric, styrene, magnets.
7 x 7 x 3 cm
From series: Flagged
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.

Intro
These days I would prefer to show my work on the body, either as a photograph or in person, because It makes more sense visually, and the viewer’s understanding of the piece is clearer. 
Do you think that jewellery is being standardized? What is there of local and universal in your artistic work?
I immigrated to Canada from England when I was 27 and I’ve lived here for twenty years now.
I attended Art Schools in both countries, so my approach to making jewellery comes from both North American and European perspectives. I think the internet tends to homogenize ideas, but this has created an even greater desire for individuality and authenticity (look at the way parents choose names for their children now - no child can have the same first name!). I think many jewellery artists are attempting to work in ways that deliberately defy categorization. I love that.


What do you expect when exposing your work to the public (for example with an exhibition)?
I think it depends on the context of the venue. These days I would prefer to show my work on the body, either as a photograph or in person, because It makes more sense visually, and the viewer’s understanding of the piece is clearer. Wearing my jewellery in public is a performance that I do enjoy on occasion, and feels more authentic than a gallery show. That being said, it's been a long time since I have had a solo exhibition, so I am working towards that!


Are other areas besides the jewellery, present in your work?
I have worked almost exclusively with textiles since my children were small. I developed a way of creating jewellery based on the quilt making technique known in North America as English Paper Piecing. This was primarily out of necessity - I needed a way of working that would be safe around small children, that I could pick up, put down and bring with me to the playground. My latest work involves ironing, which is funny because I rarely if ever iron clothes.


The last work, book, film, a city that has moved me was…
I found the Magritte exhibition I recently saw in San Francisco surprisingly relevant to these uncertain times. Perhaps Instagram should be renamed The Treachery of Images


A place, space, country whose creativity surprises me…
I am surprised that I have developed such a strong connection to Brasil, through my children, who have been taking Capoeira classes since they were very young. My family now has close ties with the Brasilian community in Vancouver and last year we travelled to Brasil on a Capoeira tour. Visiting families in the favelas was a very humbling experience. Despite, or perhaps because of, the often precarious, dangerous living conditions, Brazilians seem to be more present in the moment and celebrate their bodies as they are, unselfconsciously.


Is there any designer, jeweller, artist, you appreciate a lot?
One of my favourite artists is Grayson Perry, not only for his use of Craft as a commentary on British society and gender issues but also his fantastic documentaries. He is such a great communicator.


What piece of work has given you the most satisfaction?
I was recently commissioned to make something for a collector, and although the process was painful for me at times (impostor syndrome/fear of failure) knowing precisely who would own and wear the piece as I worked on it enabled a level of personalization that made design decisions almost automatic.


Do you read Jewellery Magazines? What is your source to get information?
I get Metalsmith Magazine with my SNAG membership and I just started listening to Perceived Value and Citizens of Craft. Metalaid is an excellent online platform that promotes Canadian art jewellery.


Do you discuss your work with other jewellery artists or any other person?
Yes - through the Vancouver Metal Arts Association I have met lots of local jewellers. I am fortunate to be able to share technical and critical advice with several artist friends including Bridget Catchpole, Jan Smith, Lexie Owen, and ZULA. I've also made jewellery friends from all over the world through the SNAG conferences.


What is your first thought when you hear the word Future?, What do you expect?
Regarding my work, FREEDOM. My children are aged 12 and 14 and becoming more independent every day, giving me more time to focus on making. I have recently set up a metalworking studio for myself, so I am waiting to see how my work will develop as I re-explore this medium. Exciting! 
 
Louise Perrone. Necklace: Dissection In Chartreuse, 2018. Satin, cashmere suiting, pearls, magnets. . 16 x 13 x 5 cm. From series: Dissected. On the body.. Louise Perrone
Necklace: Dissection In Chartreuse, 2018
Satin, cashmere suiting, pearls, magnets. 
16 x 13 x 5 cm
From series: Dissected

On the body.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
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