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The Boundaries Between Different Genres are Becoming More and More Diffuse. Philipp Spillmann interviewed by Klimt02

Interview  /  Artists
Published: 30.07.2020
Author:
Klimt02
Edited by:
Klimt02
Edited at:
Barcelona
Edited on:
2020
Philipp Spillmann. Brooch: Backsides, 2017. Hi-macs, 925 silver, steel needle.. 6.2 x 5.3 x 1.4 cm; 6.5 x 5.7 x 1.4 cm; 6.1 x 5.1 x 1.4 cm. Photo by: Aliona Pazdniakova. Back view. . Philipp Spillmann
Brooch: Backsides, 2017
Hi-macs, 925 silver, steel needle.
6.2 x 5.3 x 1.4 cm; 6.5 x 5.7 x 1.4 cm; 6.1 x 5.1 x 1.4 cm
Photo by: Aliona Pazdniakova

Back view.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.

Intro
I consider contemporary jewellery having, like other craft disciplines, a potential to be the counterpole of modern high-speed production and fast consumption. The creative processes, repetitive motions and time perspectives of crafting might cultivate valuable qualities otherwise soon to be overshadowed by the increase of lifestyle diseases and environmental damage.
Tell us about your background. What were your first influences to be creative and become an artist and what has drawn you to contemporary jewellery?
I had a classic goldsmith apprenticeship in Switzerland in the 90s. I was mainly interested in learning a traditional craft and didn't get much in touch with contemporary jewellery back then even though art and creativity have always been central in my life. The urge to experiment and to express has grown stronger over the years and I naturally applied it to my craftsmanship. It grew into art jewellery, objects and sculptures. There are many influences. A very early and lasting fascination is comics, especially the ligne claire (clear line) pioneered by Hergé who was the Belgian creator of The Adventures of Tintin, has left a vivid impression. Music has also been an important source. I could name Frank Zappa among many other great musicians as a grand inspiration.


How important is networking for you in your professional practice and what are your preferred tools for this?
Creative processes can be lonely and the field of contemporary jewellery and craft is relatively small. It is important to have platforms to exchange experiences and to work towards common interests and goals. Norway has a well-organized network of art associations and there are a lot of interactions between different art disciplines. It helps me a lot.


What are your general thoughts on the contemporary jewellery world, (education, market, development...), where do you see chances and where are dead ends?
I consider contemporary jewellery having, like other craft disciplines, a potential to be the counterpole of modern high-speed production and fast consumption. The creative processes, repetitive motions and time perspectives of crafting might cultivate valuable qualities otherwise soon to be overshadowed by the increase of lifestyle diseases and environmental damage. In this regard, the following trends and fashion might lead to a dead end. I also believe in a proper craft education; a solid foundation of mastering tools and technics can be crucial to achieving creative freedom.

Philipp Spillmann. Pendant: Svineri III, 2019. Plastic pig, ebony, hi-macs, butchers twine. 4.6 x 1.9 x 1.9 cm. Photo by: Aliona Pazdniakova. Pendant with object.


Thinking about your career, what role do technology and digital play in your artistic development & communication?
I have been creating my works in a rather rural part of the world. Technology has given me the chance to present my work and reach out to the world no matter where I am located. Everything has its two sides though; technology can free us as well as it can limit us. In terms of the working process, it is the craft that drives me; the direct connection between mind and hands. Technology becomes often a necessary distress for me.


How has your work changed over the past few years and what are you excited about these days?
It is constantly flowing and extending. I am excited about many things. But I am frustrated and sad about many things too. It all gets mashed together somewhere and something comes back out. The creative process is very exciting! I have recently been working somewhere between jewellery, objects, sculptures and installations. Right now, I am working with art in public buildings. The boundaries between different genres are becoming more and more diffuse.
 
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