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The World Needs Greater Solidarity Than Ever. Yukiko Kakimoto interviewed by Klimt02

Interview
Published: 15.07.2020
Yukiko Kakimoto Yukiko Kakimoto
Author:
Klimt02
Edited at:
Barcelona
Edited on:
2020
Yukiko Kakimoto. Brooch: Planet #01, #02, 2019. Potter's clay, glaze, Urushi (Japanese lacquer), Sumi (Japanese black ink), pure gold powder (right), pure silver powder (left). Pin: sterling silver, nickel silver.. Left: 6 x 0.7 x 6 cm; Right: 6 x 0.8 x 6 cm. Photo by: Yukiko Kakimoto. From series: Sumi. Yukiko Kakimoto
Brooch: Planet #01, #02, 2019
Potter's clay, glaze, Urushi (Japanese lacquer), Sumi (Japanese black ink), pure gold powder (right), pure silver powder (left). Pin: sterling silver, nickel silver.
Left: 6 x 0.7 x 6 cm; Right: 6 x 0.8 x 6 cm
Photo by: Yukiko Kakimoto
From series: Sumi
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.

Intro
Technology and digital play an important role as tools to advertise my artworks. Among others, it became easier to connect with people around the world who are interested in my works. And I am very pleased that the means of presenting works have expanded.
Tell us about your background. What were your first influences to be creative and become an artist and what has drawn you to contemporary jewellery?
The origin of my creation is in my childhood. I was a girl who was keen on drawing pictures, making stories, and creating something formative with a free mind. So it was very natural for me to be an artist. My artistic approach was intuitive and needed techniques from various genres, without being limited by any stereotypes, to give shape to an image I had in my head. I understand that the process of developing skills through repeated trial and error was inevitable in making contemporary art jewelry works. I'm interested in the vague human heart that can't be actually seen or touched. The attraction of contemporary jewelry would be that it is an art that you can put on your body. And how does something more profound than just beauty as an ornament affect our hearts? I would like to explore the infinite possibilities of art.
 
 
How important is networking for you in your professional practice and what are your preferred tools for this?
Not only for professional practice but also in life the connection between people is very important. I feel that the world needs greater solidarity than ever. I think it is important to help each other regardless of country, nationality, or gender. Now that various social media have made it possible and communication has become easier, the world is certainly expanding.
I especially welcome and appreciate the personal network developed in real life at group exhibitions and art fairs. I think it is also an important role for artists to participate in charity activities.
 
 
What are your general thoughts on the contemporary jewelry world, (education, market, development...), where do you see chances and where are dead ends?
I think that the number of creators of contemporary jewelry is increasing year by year, but its concept seems to be ambiguous. I think educating the general public is important to expand demand.


Brooch: Grasp, 2019, Potter's clay, glaze, Urushi (Japanese lacquer), Sumi (Japanese black ink), pure gold powder. Pin: sterling silver, nickel silver, 6.9 x 2 x 3.7 cm. From series: Sumi. Photo by: Yukiko Kakimoto.


Thinking about your career, what role do technology and the digital play in your artistic development & communication?
Technology and digital play an important role as tools to advertise my artworks. Among others, it became easier to connect with people around the world who are interested in my works. And I am very pleased that the means of presenting works have expanded.
 
 
How has your work changed over the past few years and what are you excited about these days?
My work goes through many processes until completion: empty my mind, play with soil (forming), let it go once, and entrust to the God of Fire (baking in a kiln). Then, once it comes back in my hand, I color it with the technique of Kintsugi, and lastly produce brooch pin, attach and done.
Using my body and mind, and the tool called technique, I create it. With God's hands there, I am always excited and grateful for work that cannot be done by myself. My work is the result of a long dialogue with the blessings of nature and will eventually return to earth just like us. In recent years, I have been selected as a participating artist at art fairs and exhibitions in Europe, and I actively enjoy the opportunity to exhibit.
 
Appreciate APPRECIATE