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My works are always motivated by the love coming from inside me. Yukiko Kakimoto interviewed by Klimt02

Interview  /  Artists
Published: 04.10.2019
Yukiko Kakimoto, photo by Terumasa Honda.​ Yukiko Kakimoto, photo by Terumasa Honda.​
Author:
Klimt02
Edited by:
Klimt02
Edited at:
Barcelona
Yukiko Kakimoto. Brooch: Skin #02, 2019. Potter's clay, glaze, Urushi (Japanese lacquer), pure gold powder, sterling silver, nickel silver.. 8.2 x 0.3 x 2.3 cm. Photo by: Yukiko Kakimoto. From series: Veins. Yukiko Kakimoto
Brooch: Skin #02, 2019
Potter's clay, glaze, Urushi (Japanese lacquer), pure gold powder, sterling silver, nickel silver.
8.2 x 0.3 x 2.3 cm
Photo by: Yukiko Kakimoto
From series: Veins
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.

Intro
Natural lacquer extracted from plants slowly solidifies over time, and by layering it multiple times, it turns into a stronger product. And it's a bit like our life, where we go through bittersweet, destruction and rebirth, sometimes leaving all to God, and eventually grow with love.
What's local and universal in your artistic work?
My work always has a universal theme. It is born from everyday life and always motivated by the love coming from inside me. A variety of materials and techniques, old and new, and the beauty of use without being bound by stereotypes. I think that comes from my view of life and death. Everything has a vibration, and we more or less influence each other every day. I want to be close to people and deliver a message through my work. My brooches are colored with the technique of Kintsugi on the base made with the power of earth and fire. The process until the brooch is made is likened to our life. Kintsugi is a unique culture in Japan that repairs the broken or chipped ceramics. The technique not only repairs the broken teaware with lacquer but also decorates the joints with gold, silver, tin, etc. Kintsugi was born from the delicate aesthetic sense of the Japanese who valued and appreciated even the cracked traces. Natural lacquer extracted from plants slowly solidifies over time, and by layering it multiple times, it turns into a stronger product. And it's a bit like our life, where we go through bittersweet, destruction and rebirth, sometimes leaving all to God, and eventually grow with love. We are living now while repairing our damaged heart and body many times. From there, we learn a lot and can be stronger, have a deeper life, and wear a new beautiful light. I want you to be reminded of that by wearing this brooch.


What do you expect when you show your work to the public (for example, with an exhibition)?
It's a lot of fun to see how people feel something from my work. Every emotion has some kind of connection. It can be positive or negative. I think that touching people's hearts is an important role of my work.


How important is the handmade for you in your development? What role does technics and technology play in your development?
My work doesn't require technology. Of course, it is used in the kiln to burn broach bases and the process of manufacturing materials. However, I think my hands are the most important tool for my work. I believe that a unique identity is given to a piece by making it carefully one by one with my hands.
 

When you start making a new piece what is your process? How much of it is a pre-formulated plan and how much do you let the material spontaneity lead you?
A new piece is made according to the inspiration rising from inside me. While working with my hands, I picture the completed form first in my mind, but I make it while flexibly accepting changes and new discoveries. The material I use is alive. It is delicate and sensitive to the environment such as humidity and temperature. I enjoy working with the material while interacting with it.


Are there any other areas besides the jewels present in your work?
Visual art in general, applied and plastic arts, Kintsugi, etc.
I used to be the director of a gallery before and have been involved with artists of various genres for many years. In particular, I think visual arts have a significant role in society.


How important is wearability in contemporary jewellery? And in your pieces?
My work is based on the beauty of use. It means it should not be something outrageous or just visually beautiful, but actually wearing it should give a happy feeling and joy to the heart. I think that is one of the roles my pieces have.


The last work, book, film, city that moved me was...
Portugal.
It began with meeting important people who gave me a reason to create my jewelry pieces.
They were having difficult times in their lives. Knowing that I can't really do anything, but I couldn't suppress the urge to be close to their hearts and support them.
I made a brooch to put near the heart, praying with all my heart to give them courage and strength to overcome the challenges that occurred in their lives. This is how my jewelry work was born.


What/who is the biggest influence in your career?
All my experiences.


Which piece or work gave you more satisfaction?
I have never been satisfied. It’s because it is no longer necessary to create a piece when you are satisfied.


What is your source to get information?
There is nothing particular.


Considering the experiences you have had over the years - if you could go back and give yourself a piece of advice for the start-up phase, what would that be?
My experiences made me what I am. I think they are all essential, no matter how stupid they were. So I wouldn’t give myself any advice unless I imagine a completely different life.


Can you describe your personality in 3 words, describe your work in 3 words.
My personality: intuitive, passionate, adventurous. 
My work: intuitive, philosophical, love.
Yukiko Kakimoto. Brooch: Skin #03, 2019. Potter's clay, glaze, Urushi (Japanese lacquer), pure gold powder, sterling silver, nickel silver.. 6.5 x 0.4 x 3.2 cm. Photo by: Yukiko Kakimoto. From series: Veins. Yukiko Kakimoto
Brooch: Skin #03, 2019
Potter's clay, glaze, Urushi (Japanese lacquer), pure gold powder, sterling silver, nickel silver.
6.5 x 0.4 x 3.2 cm
Photo by: Yukiko Kakimoto
From series: Veins
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
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