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Plastic is Forever

Exhibition  /  06 May 2016  -  05 Jun 2016
Published: 29.04.2016
What Lies Under, Ferdi Rizkiyanto, 2011.
What Lies Under, Ferdi Rizkiyanto, 2011

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Intro
When our bodies feel uncomfortable, we go to the Doctor, but when the Earth is unwell, we must reimagine a home where humanity and nature blend in harmony.
 

Artist list

Farrah Al-Dujaili, Jivan Astfalck, Laura Bradshaw-Heap, Laura Brannon, Hannah May Chapman, Lana Crabb, Rachel Darbourne, Nanna Grønborg, Harriet Laurence, Jillian Moore, Zoe Robertson, Louise Thilly, Eva Van Kempen
What lies beneath the ocean?
What is the most dangerous to us in the ocean?
Exactly, how much plastic is there in our oceans?
What goes into the ocean? What goes into you?
Are we doing enough to control our waste?
Can we be part of the solutions?


Plastic is Forever would enable the restaurant SILO to become a repository to remind the awareness about the concepts of plastic pollution in the ocean during Brighton Fringe 2016. The Plastic is Forever will be an incubator on display and open to everyone. Plastic is Forever aims to create a platform where new jewellery movement will be introduced and jewellery made from unwanted materials will be exhibited, but at the same time, publicly tested. 

Modern makers explore materials with a different point of view than before. Swedish born Louise Thilly graduated from Design & Craft (BA Hons) at Brighton University. She specialises in wood and plastic, stemming from a desire to utilize sustainable as well as waste materials prominent in society, highlighting various ideas of sustainability in her work. Fascinated by ancient and traditional craft techniques, she often explores how modern design and materials can be complemented by ancient skill and wisdom.
 
Through recycling waste plastics, she is able to explore many design possibilities far beyond the disposable functions they were often intended for, and through this aims to challenge throw-away culture, by highlighting the beauty and strengths of this undervalued material. Exploring opportunities in materials has always been an underpinning theme in her work, and is a continuing process and journey.

Harriet Laurence, an MA student of Sustainable Design, specialising in jewellery, at Brighton University, seeks where is the gold? 

JUNK: Rubbish to Gold, is a playful exploration of community economies, which put on display the process of creating the work of art. It aims to foster and develop multilayered networks, challenging and extending jewellery as a medium to communicate with the public and and deepen our understanding of the impact of the arts. This project partnered with charities, who supplied JUNK jewellery. During a public performance of thirty-one jewellers gifted their skills, reconstructing pieces selected from a mountain of JUNK creating reimagined artworks for the exhibitions. The performance was live-streamed on screens in the mac Birmingham and the Museum of the Jewellery Quarter and across the world.
(See streaming: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U--__TLQc_c)

Eva van Kempen is a Dutch goldsmith - designer, whose earlier work consists of merely traditional goldsmithing techniques, such as filigree, wax carving and embossing. Nature, indigenous jewellery and Art Nouveau still influence her design as well as used to. Her recent work and source of inspiration, however, is anything but traditional. The content finds its origin in a chemotherapy she had to undergo. That was when she discovered the immense value and beauty of medical tools such as hypodermic needles and intravenous lines.
She started experimenting with safe hospital waste, like out of date systems or materials otherwise no longer suitable for patients. By adding classical materials such as fresh water pearls, precious stones and metals, valuable jewels appeared.

New Jewellery Movement
From early humans and the rise of civilisation to the modern history of Renaissance to the contemporary Industrial revolutions and the digital age, humankind is evolving, this is also true of jewellery. People who have not followed developments in jewellery may be surprised at the variety of design and materials now in use. The boundaries of jewellery have been constantly reformed since 1960s. From materials, techniques, ornaments and functions, to the relationship between the wearer and the object. This relationship has always been an interesting topic since jewellery developed into a wearable art form. It does not overturn the traditional value of the object itself, but expands the meaning of jewellery beyond body adornment. These new meanings focus more on concepts deriving from the jewellery objects.

UK Craft Council: The New Jewellery movement of the 1970s saw jewellers using non-precious materials and experimental design to highlight contemporary social and political issues. This shifted our idea of what jewellery could be and had a profound impact on future making both in the UK and beyond. 

SILO , UK's pioneer zero-waste restaurant, was conceived from a desire to innovate the food industry whilst demonstrating respect: respect for the environment, respect for the way our food is generated and respect for the nourishment given to our bodies. This means that we create everything from its whole form cutting out food miles and over-processing whilst preserving nutrients and the integrity of the ingridents in the process.

Hours

Sunday, Monday 10 - 17h
Tuesday - Saturday 10 - 22h

Closing Party 
5th June at 6pm
 
Plastic is Forever
Miss Moski
2016
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Louise Thilly. Harriet Laurence. Neckpiece: Plastic is forever, 2016. Plastic, silver.. From series: Plastic is Forever. Louise Thilly
Harriet Laurence
Neckpiece: Plastic is forever, 2016
Plastic, silver.
From series: Plastic is Forever
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Louise Thilly. Harriet Laurence. Bangle: Like Diamonds, 2016. Plastic, metal alloy.. From series: Plastic is forever. Louise Thilly
Harriet Laurence
Bangle: Like Diamonds, 2016
Plastic, metal alloy.
From series: Plastic is forever
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Louise Thilly. Harriet Laurence. Necklace: Untitled, 2016. Plastic, silver.. From series: Plastic is forever. Louise Thilly
Harriet Laurence
Necklace: Untitled, 2016
Plastic, silver.
From series: Plastic is forever
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Louise Thilly. Miss Moski. Choker: Untitled, 2016. Plastic, brass.. From series: Plastic is forever. Louise Thilly
Miss Moski
Choker: Untitled, 2016
Plastic, brass.
From series: Plastic is forever
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Laura Brannon. Necklace: No.31 Laura Brannon, 2015. Found orange plastic form, found plastic beads, found cord and glue.. 14 x 12 x 52cm. Photo by: Rod Gonzalez. From series: Junk: Rubbish to Gold. Laura Brannon
Necklace: No.31 Laura Brannon, 2015
Found orange plastic form, found plastic beads, found cord and glue.
14 x 12 x 52cm
Photo by: Rod Gonzalez
From series: Junk: Rubbish to Gold
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Zoe Robertson. Necklace: No.114 Zoe Robertson, 2015. Found plastic beads, plastic.. 12 x 9 x 72cm. Photo by: Rod Gonzalez. From series: Junk: Rubbish to Gold. Zoe Robertson
Necklace: No.114 Zoe Robertson, 2015
Found plastic beads, plastic.
12 x 9 x 72cm
Photo by: Rod Gonzalez
From series: Junk: Rubbish to Gold
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Rachel Darbourne. Necklace: No.221 Rachel Darbourne, 2015. Found plastic beads, string and latex.. 10 x 3 x 33cm. Photo by: Rod Gonzalez. From series: Junk: Rubbish to Gold. Rachel Darbourne
Necklace: No.221 Rachel Darbourne, 2015
Found plastic beads, string and latex.
10 x 3 x 33cm
Photo by: Rod Gonzalez
From series: Junk: Rubbish to Gold
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Hannah May Chapman. Necklace: No.88 Hannah May Chapman, 2015. Found plastic bracelet, seed beads and wire.. 69cm long. Photo by: Rod Gonzalez. From series: Junk: Rubbish to Gold. Hannah May Chapman
Necklace: No.88 Hannah May Chapman, 2015
Found plastic bracelet, seed beads and wire.
69cm long
Photo by: Rod Gonzalez
From series: Junk: Rubbish to Gold
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Nanna Grønborg. Necklace: No.90 Nanna Grønborg, 2015. Found plastic beaded necklaces, found plastic and metal components, glue and wire.. 60cm long. Photo by: Rod Gonzalez. From series: Junk: Rubbish to Gold. Nanna Grønborg
Necklace: No.90 Nanna Grønborg, 2015
Found plastic beaded necklaces, found plastic and metal components, glue and wire.
60cm long
Photo by: Rod Gonzalez
From series: Junk: Rubbish to Gold
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Lana Crabb. Necklace: No.102 Lana Crabb, 2015. Found plastic beads, found plastic bracelet, found plastic components, glue and thread.. 10 x 3 x 37cm. Photo by: Rod Gonzalez. From series: Junk: Rubbish to Gold. Lana Crabb
Necklace: No.102 Lana Crabb, 2015
Found plastic beads, found plastic bracelet, found plastic components, glue and thread.
10 x 3 x 37cm
Photo by: Rod Gonzalez
From series: Junk: Rubbish to Gold
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Jillian Moore. Necklace: No.140 Jillian Moore, 2015. Found plastic beads, found plastic components, found textile, plastic cord, nylon thread and glue.. 7.5 x 4 x 64cm. Photo by: Rod Gonzalez. From series: Junk: Rubbish to Gold. Jillian Moore
Necklace: No.140 Jillian Moore, 2015
Found plastic beads, found plastic components, found textile, plastic cord, nylon thread and glue.
7.5 x 4 x 64cm
Photo by: Rod Gonzalez
From series: Junk: Rubbish to Gold
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Eva Van Kempen. Piece: Open/close clamp, 2015. Intravenous line, imitation blood coral, fresh water pearls, polyurethane, silver. Photo by: Hugo Rompa. From series: LifeLines. Necklace, shoulder and back jewel, cast silver cap engraved with Eva's patient number and barcode. Eva Van Kempen
Piece: Open/close clamp, 2015
Intravenous line, imitation blood coral, fresh water pearls, polyurethane, silver
Photo by: Hugo Rompa
From series: LifeLines
Necklace, shoulder and back jewel, cast silver cap engraved with Eva's patient number and barcode
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Eva Van Kempen. Piece: Combination of lines, 2015. Intravenous line, drain line, oxygen line, fresh water pearls. Photo by: Hugo Rompa. From series: LifeLines. Necklace and shoulder jewel. Eva Van Kempen
Piece: Combination of lines, 2015
Intravenous line, drain line, oxygen line, fresh water pearls
Photo by: Hugo Rompa
From series: LifeLines
Necklace and shoulder jewel
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Eva Van Kempen. Piece: Open/close clamp, 2015. Intravenous line, imitation blood coral, fresh water pearls, polyurethane, silver. Photo by: Hugo Rompa. From series: LifeLines. Necklace, shoulder and back jewel, cast silver cap engraved with Eva's patient number and barcode. Eva Van Kempen
Piece: Open/close clamp, 2015
Intravenous line, imitation blood coral, fresh water pearls, polyurethane, silver
Photo by: Hugo Rompa
From series: LifeLines
Necklace, shoulder and back jewel, cast silver cap engraved with Eva's patient number and barcode
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Eva Van Kempen. Bracelet: String of pearls, 2015. Intravenous line, moving fresh water pearls, magnets. Photo by: Barbara Boots. From series: LifeLines. Connecting 4 or more pieces makes a necklace. Eva Van Kempen
Bracelet: String of pearls, 2015
Intravenous line, moving fresh water pearls, magnets
Photo by: Barbara Boots
From series: LifeLines
Connecting 4 or more pieces makes a necklace
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Eva Van Kempen. Piece: CO + O2, 2015. Oxygen line, loose diamonds,magnets. Photo by: Hugo Rompa. From series: LifeLines. Necklace combined with 3 bracelets. Eva Van Kempen
Piece: CO + O2, 2015
Oxygen line, loose diamonds,magnets
Photo by: Hugo Rompa
From series: LifeLines
Necklace combined with 3 bracelets
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
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