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CANCELED / Talente Competition 2021

Award  /  Curating   Collecting   Exhibiting   OnlineOnly  /  10 Mar 2021  -  14 Mar 2021
Published: 22.01.2021
CANCELED / Talente Competition 2021.
Internationale Handwerkmesse Munich
Management:
Wolfgang Lösche, Braesel Michaela
.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.

Intro
The Talente exhibition planned from 10 to 14 March 2021, is canceled due to the continued restrictions in place to contain the coronavirus pandemic.

Talente, a special show organized into the Handwerk & Design exhibition is an annual competition for new talent in the areas of design and technology. Young artists working in the applied arts and technology will have the opportunity to show their work in the international competition TALENTE every year in Munich.
 

This year we received in spite of the difficult situation more than 500 applications from over 50 countries and it was a very difficult task to come to a decision and a selection.

In 2021, “Talente” will present works by 101 young craftsmen, artists, and designers from 31 countries in 13 different material groups. This year there will also be works by participants from Argentina, China, Estonia, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Latvia, Lithuania, Romania, Taiwan, and Ukraine. “Talente” will show innovative, imaginative, extraordinary, and very different works, especially in the areas of glass, ceramics, jewelry, and textiles. The many applications in the field of textiles reflect the huge interest in textiles and fashion, which in recent years has also shown itself in exhibitions, discussions, and studies, particularly concerning the aspect of sustainability and alternative materials.


>> Download the list of selected artists in Talente Competition 2021.


Accordingly, “Talente” will also be presenting a large number of works this year that deal with material investigations and research. This involves reusing existing and processed materials such as leather, textiles, industrial and plastic waste. At the same time, it is about the development of new packaging materials that are biodegradable in order to reduce the amount of plastic waste.
 
In the fields of ceramics and glass, there is a striking mixture of works that try to find new approaches based on existing traditions and those that strive to go their own way and achieve a new effect with the material. For example, “Talente 2021” presents traditional Korean moon vases, which are now made from clay that has been given a new consistency and surface effect using local waste and fruit residues.
 
Among the presented glassworks are sculptural works that allow the material to come into its own, be it by superimposing thin surfaces of different colours or by working with atmospheric, transitory impressions that suggest water and ice through the formation of bubbles and the opposition of opaque and transparent, calmly and dynamic areas. In addition, there are vase objects that achieve a high level of mastery-based on traditional techniques and modern form language, or projects in which glass is blown into woven basket shapes, which help determine shape and surface.
 
A correspondingly broad spectrum can be found in ceramics. Here, too, everyday objects based on traditional patterns are presented alongside sculptural, monumental-looking works of classic design. Furthermore, there are three-dimensional works with strong, dynamic relief, in which various materials can also be incorporated and which address the subject of transience and transformation. Other objects deal with architectural associations, political-biographical reflections or present very differently conceived animal sculptures.
 
The attempt to combine tradition and modernity can also be found in the area of ​​furniture
. In addition to elaborate desks with drawer compartments or sculptural furniture, there are modern stools that combine leather and steel, with a commitment to colour, or furniture that is created using lashing straps.
 
In the field of wood, the breadth ranges from tiny wooden insects, whose decay is indicated in test series, to beach and forest huts. In the field of metal, the works range from classic everyday objects of balanced proportions and elegance to organic shapes and objects with interesting and unusual surfaces.
 
The textile sector is defined by works that deal with aspects of sustainability and multiple uses, protection, and security: warm stoles that are inspired by the structures of leaves, thick sweaters, and headgear, children's hats in the shape of animals, soft blankets, cozy hanging seats, imaginative face masks that are supposed to protect against air pollution. In addition, there are fashion designs in which the basic shapes are changed by embroidery or items of clothing that are cut out of printed fabric strips and are sewn together.
 
The pandemic is a topic that is reflected both in considerations about the design of face masks as well as in reflections on the vulnerability and fragility of the body, which are implemented in motifs and textile structure.
 
This year, a major theme of the fashion exhibits are knitted garments with elaborate, complicated, shaping patterns. The technology is consciously exploited for the contrast of dense areas and loose, transparent areas.
 
Once again, a particularly large number of applications were received in the field of jewellery
. An exciting selection has been made that includes many different positions and a range of materials. Recycled plastics, found objects, wood, silicone, glass beads of various shapes, quartz, various stones, and metals are used, which are elaborately processed with the aim for attractive surface effects and forms of often poetic character. The focus is on a precise perception of material qualities and the beauty of the seemingly irrelevant and worthless.
 
All in all, an interesting and diverse selection has emerged that shows how young artists, craftsmen, and designers are dealing with contemporary, topical issues. The aim is to reflect on various contents, to design functional, aesthetically convincing objects, to update traditions, and to strive for more sustainability and the considered use of materials.

The focus of the competition is on work that shines through its formal and technical originality and technical perfection and is ahead of its time. The competition is being organised by the Munich and Upper Bavarian Chamber of Skilled Trades and jointly sponsored by the Federal Ministry of Economics and Energy and the Bavarian State Ministry for Economics and Media, Energy and Technology. „Talente“ takes place every year as a special exhibition during the Munich International Skilled Trades Fair in March.

A catalogue will be published for the special exhibition: Each artist will be presented with a colour photograph.


Prizes and Awards:
Talente-Prize
  • Eight contributions will be awarded the TALENTE-Prize.
  • Works will be acknowledged at the TALENTE-Catalogue of the following year (including photography and text).
  • Distinguished exhibitors receive a certificate.
Bavarian States Prize
  • Every exhibitor at the International Trade Fair can apply for the Bavarian States Prize.
  • The Bavarian States Prize is awarded 5,000 Euros, a gold medal, and a certificate.
The Awards will be given on the 13th of March at 4:30 pm.


Organisation and Funding:
Promoter: GHM – Gesellschaft für Handwerksmessen mbH.
Administration: Wolfgang Lösche, Handwerkskammer für München und Oberbayern.
Organisation: Michaela Braesel, Handwerkskammer für München und Oberbayern.


We are grateful for the support provided by the Federal Ministry of Commerce and Energy, and the Bavarian State Ministry of Commerce and Media, Energy and Technology. The publication of the catalogue is enabled by funding from the Association of Trades Fairs.
 
Karina Vodovoz. Textile: Fire, 2019. Mohair. 170 x 60 x 2 cm. Photo by: Ariel Medina. Hand knitted. 
. Karina Vodovoz’s works are inspired by the elements to which they refer in their respective colours. They are hand-knitted from mohair and decorated with various relief patterns - a wide variety of braided and ribbed patterns. In these textures, Karina Vodovoz refers to ruins, vegetation, and organic structures that form a story of decay and regrowth. For her, the clothes act as a kind of futuristic archaeological find, a reflection of the future and the past. At the same time, her work also serves as a critique of a society shaped by capitalism and consumption and its value systems and priorities, which allow famine, epidemics, and wars.
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.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Karina Vodovoz
Textile: Fire, 2019
Mohair
170 x 60 x 2 cm
Photo by: Ariel Medina
Hand knitted

Karina Vodovoz’s works are inspired by the elements to which they refer in their respective colours. They are hand-knitted from mohair and decorated with various relief patterns - a wide variety of braided and ribbed patterns. In these textures, Karina Vodovoz refers to ruins, vegetation, and organic structures that form a story of decay and regrowth. For her, the clothes act as a kind of futuristic archaeological find, a reflection of the future and the past. At the same time, her work also serves as a critique of a society shaped by capitalism and consumption and its value systems and priorities, which allow famine, epidemics, and wars.

 
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Enis Akiev. Object: Plastic Stone Tiles, 2018. PP, LDPE.. 9 x 9 cm. Photo by: KISD Fotostudio. 
. The tiles in the “Plastic Stone Tiles – the nature of waste”-project are made from post-consumer plastic waste. The starting point of the project was the question of the nature of waste and the subjective definition of this term, especially in relation to another term – that of resources. For Enis Akiev, waste is initially unused material. Most of the waste ends up in the sea, where under natural influences plastiglomerate is formed – a combination of plastic and natural geological components, ultimately a new type of rock. Based on this, Enis Akiev investigated rock-forming processes and developed methods to give light packaging waste a natural-looking, rock-like structure. Her aim is to change the perception of waste and show its special aesthetics by focusing on post-consumer plastic waste. This increases the value of the single-use packaging waste and transforms it into an aesthetically pleasing, durable material. With her work, she would at the same time like to encourage people to reflect more about the possible uses of waste, especially in view of the decline in natural resources. The result of her project is attractive tiles of great diversity in terms of colour and pattern structure, which allow different types of rock to be associated.
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.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Enis Akiev
Object: Plastic Stone Tiles, 2018
PP, LDPE.
9 x 9 cm
Photo by: KISD Fotostudio

The tiles in the “Plastic Stone Tiles – the nature of waste”-project are made from post-consumer plastic waste. The starting point of the project was the question of the nature of waste and the subjective definition of this term, especially in relation to another term – that of resources. For Enis Akiev, waste is initially unused material. Most of the waste ends up in the sea, where under natural influences plastiglomerate is formed – a combination of plastic and natural geological components, ultimately a new type of rock. Based on this, Enis Akiev investigated rock-forming processes and developed methods to give light packaging waste a natural-looking, rock-like structure. Her aim is to change the perception of waste and show its special aesthetics by focusing on post-consumer plastic waste. This increases the value of the single-use packaging waste and transforms it into an aesthetically pleasing, durable material. With her work, she would at the same time like to encourage people to reflect more about the possible uses of waste, especially in view of the decline in natural resources. The result of her project is attractive tiles of great diversity in terms of colour and pattern structure, which allow different types of rock to be associated.

 
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Sabina Dragusanu. Necklace: Untitled, 2020. Upcycled plastics.. 46 x 20 x 2.8 cm. Crocheted. 
. Sabina Dragusanu understands the works from the series “Neighbourhood Links” as material-based experiments in which she varies and continues her topic of plastic upcycling. Just as the lockdown was decided, she ran out of plastic bags. With the help of her local community website, she started asking the neighbours about plastic bags and was favourably surprised at the many responses. Almost at the same time, she began to be interested in the technique of crocheting and decided to process plastic bags in yarn. From this yarn, she crochets oval links and strands. For her, the motif of connecting different members refers to the idea that people help each other in difficult times, as she experienced in her community in south-west London. The necklace made of large oval links surprises with the irregular surface and distribution of colours - a result of the crocheting technique. The result is lively and subtle chromaticity.
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.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Sabina Dragusanu
Necklace: Untitled, 2020
Upcycled plastics.
46 x 20 x 2.8 cm
Crocheted

Sabina Dragusanu understands the works from the series “Neighbourhood Links” as material-based experiments in which she varies and continues her topic of plastic upcycling. Just as the lockdown was decided, she ran out of plastic bags. With the help of her local community website, she started asking the neighbours about plastic bags and was favourably surprised at the many responses. Almost at the same time, she began to be interested in the technique of crocheting and decided to process plastic bags in yarn. From this yarn, she crochets oval links and strands. For her, the motif of connecting different members refers to the idea that people help each other in difficult times, as she experienced in her community in south-west London. The necklace made of large oval links surprises with the irregular surface and distribution of colours - a result of the crocheting technique. The result is lively and subtle chromaticity.

 
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Louis Rösner. Furniture: Tendo, 2020. Plywood board. 47.5 x 54 x 47 cm. Photo by: Eva Jünger. Material bending based on cuts and tension.. 
. The “Tendo”-stool (lat.: tightening) is a piece of furniture that can be assembled quickly, easily, and neatly. The stool consists of only three elements and no further aids are required for assembling. The stool gains its stability from an integrated tension belt. The belt connects a centrally placed spar with the stool legs and its seat. Only when the belt is tensioned does the piece of furniture bend from a two-dimensional into a three-dimensional shape. This conversion is enabled by carefully thought-out cuts in the wood, which at the same time ensure that the seat surface flexibly adapts to the person sitting. This promotes dynamic sitting, relieves the back when sitting and prevents consequential damage caused by monotonous stress on the spine. The shape presented is the result of an extensive series of tests in which various designs were produced as models with the “Speedy100R” laser cutter from “trotec” and then compared with regard to stability, flexibility, and appearance. The lashing strap is highlighted by the choice of bright colours that are repeated on the two edges of the stool. The aim was to keep the work as straightforward as possible. That is why all wood components should be manufactured with just one machine. Multiplex or plywood was chosen as material. This is stable, has good dimensional stability, and can be easily processed with the laser. The technical drawings were created with Vectorworks and converted into processing files so that the panels could be cut with the MTL laser system from "rofin". In order to minimize waste, the components of a stool were produced from just one sheet.
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.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Louis Rösner
Furniture: Tendo, 2020
Plywood board
47.5 x 54 x 47 cm
Photo by: Eva Jünger
Material bending based on cuts and tension.

The “Tendo”-stool (lat.: tightening) is a piece of furniture that can be assembled quickly, easily, and neatly. The stool consists of only three elements and no further aids are required for assembling. The stool gains its stability from an integrated tension belt. The belt connects a centrally placed spar with the stool legs and its seat. Only when the belt is tensioned does the piece of furniture bend from a two-dimensional into a three-dimensional shape. This conversion is enabled by carefully thought-out cuts in the wood, which at the same time ensure that the seat surface flexibly adapts to the person sitting. This promotes dynamic sitting, relieves the back when sitting and prevents consequential damage caused by monotonous stress on the spine. The shape presented is the result of an extensive series of tests in which various designs were produced as models with the “Speedy100R” laser cutter from “trotec” and then compared with regard to stability, flexibility, and appearance. The lashing strap is highlighted by the choice of bright colours that are repeated on the two edges of the stool. The aim was to keep the work as straightforward as possible. That is why all wood components should be manufactured with just one machine. Multiplex or plywood was chosen as material. This is stable, has good dimensional stability, and can be easily processed with the laser. The technical drawings were created with Vectorworks and converted into processing files so that the panels could be cut with the MTL laser system from "rofin". In order to minimize waste, the components of a stool were produced from just one sheet.

 
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Rose Armstrong. Installation: A Requiem for Insects, 2018. Bamboo plywood, watercolour paint.. 180 x 240 x 10 cm. Photo by: Jack Durr, Sophie Fitch. Laser cut, engraved.. 
. "A Requiem for Insects" reflects the decline in insect populations in Australia and the associated fears about the impending extinction of these species. Insects are important for human health and the closed nature of the ecosystem. All of the species shown in the installation are now on the list of threatened beings. Original-sized insects are created by laser cutting and engraving of wood. The forms are also painted in watercolors to look more natural. Rose Armstrong creates a series of works that documents the dissolving process of each insect in different stages. The individual components of the work are characterized by fragility and detail, which at the same time adequately and emphatically implement the delicacy of these living beings, as well as the threat to their existence. The use of wood also refers to the cutting down of the old forests and the removal of the natural habitat of the insects. The arrangement of the works is reminiscent of scientific collection concepts. In doing so, they not only indicate a museum context, but also the consideration of whether such insects can still find their way into such collections in a few years' time, or whether they are not already extinct by then.
. 
.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Rose Armstrong
Installation: A Requiem for Insects, 2018
Bamboo plywood, watercolour paint.
180 x 240 x 10 cm
Photo by: Jack Durr, Sophie Fitch
Laser cut, engraved.

"A Requiem for Insects" reflects the decline in insect populations in Australia and the associated fears about the impending extinction of these species. Insects are important for human health and the closed nature of the ecosystem. All of the species shown in the installation are now on the list of threatened beings. Original-sized insects are created by laser cutting and engraving of wood. The forms are also painted in watercolors to look more natural. Rose Armstrong creates a series of works that documents the dissolving process of each insect in different stages. The individual components of the work are characterized by fragility and detail, which at the same time adequately and emphatically implement the delicacy of these living beings, as well as the threat to their existence. The use of wood also refers to the cutting down of the old forests and the removal of the natural habitat of the insects. The arrangement of the works is reminiscent of scientific collection concepts. In doing so, they not only indicate a museum context, but also the consideration of whether such insects can still find their way into such collections in a few years' time, or whether they are not already extinct by then.

 
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Emma Baker. Object: Carragh VI, 2020. Glass.. 16 x 23 x 5 cm. Photo by: Emma Baker. Blown glass, kiln worked, cold worked.. 
. Emma Baker's glass objects consist of thin, finely nuanced glass plates arranged one on top of the other. They become larger towards the middle of the object, only to diminish their size towards the top. The various shades of blue, white, and grey and the finely swaying edges of the platelets give the work a liveliness and a momentary impression. For Emma Baker, the fascination of the material and the examination of her own memories are the main stimuli for her work. These memories are captured in the medium of glass and combined with the mastery of the material result in very personal works.
. 
.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Emma Baker
Object: Carragh VI, 2020
Glass.
16 x 23 x 5 cm
Photo by: Emma Baker
Blown glass, kiln worked, cold worked.

Emma Baker's glass objects consist of thin, finely nuanced glass plates arranged one on top of the other. They become larger towards the middle of the object, only to diminish their size towards the top. The various shades of blue, white, and grey and the finely swaying edges of the platelets give the work a liveliness and a momentary impression. For Emma Baker, the fascination of the material and the examination of her own memories are the main stimuli for her work. These memories are captured in the medium of glass and combined with the mastery of the material result in very personal works.

 
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Paloma Vega. Necklace: Alien Avocado, 2020. Fabric, seed beads, crystals, tiger eye, aventurine, bugles, onyx, freshwater pearls, thread.. 43 x 19 x 0.5 cm. Photo by: Gino Battiston. Pearl embroidery. 
. Paloma Vega sees her jewellery as journeys through landscapes with fantastic topography that condense colour, shape and volume. Different threads and beads create different structures. Each area is therefore not only determined by a certain colour and individual shape, but also by texture. Her work is based entirely on the inspiration she receives from the materials, so the result is never certain in advance. The chaos clears up in jewellery and individual forms crystallize out of a wealth of possibilities. Paloma Vega considers bead embroidery to be a perfect technique since all possibilities remain open, and different paths can be taken. The individual parts in her works are closely related. In this, she sees a parallel to human life and the relationships between people. She esteems the work also as the result of playful experiments with Latin American influences.
. 
.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Paloma Vega
Necklace: Alien Avocado, 2020
Fabric, seed beads, crystals, tiger eye, aventurine, bugles, onyx, freshwater pearls, thread.
43 x 19 x 0.5 cm
Photo by: Gino Battiston
Pearl embroidery

Paloma Vega sees her jewellery as journeys through landscapes with fantastic topography that condense colour, shape and volume. Different threads and beads create different structures. Each area is therefore not only determined by a certain colour and individual shape, but also by texture. Her work is based entirely on the inspiration she receives from the materials, so the result is never certain in advance. The chaos clears up in jewellery and individual forms crystallize out of a wealth of possibilities. Paloma Vega considers bead embroidery to be a perfect technique since all possibilities remain open, and different paths can be taken. The individual parts in her works are closely related. In this, she sees a parallel to human life and the relationships between people. She esteems the work also as the result of playful experiments with Latin American influences.

 
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
May Bar Levav. Body piece: Air We Wear | Oil Spill Mexico Mask, 2019. Tencel, Aloe Vera, Pla, wool filters.. 28 x 18 x 16 cm. Photo by: Michael Shvadron. Industrial Knitting and 3D Printing.. 
. May Bar Levav's work was created in response to the increasing air pollution and the corona pandemic, as well as the single-use products produced in this context. She complains that these products are not sustainable and that they are made from environmentally harmful plastic materials. For a long time, the mask was reserved for certain professional groups or was worn for religious reasons, but it has now become a general obligation. May Bar Levav hopes that even after the pandemic, the masks will continue to be worn as a preventive measure. It was her concern to use in her masks natural materials that are sustainably produced, as such materials are healthier for the body and facial skin, which are also protected by the mask. She combines three-dimensional structures for mouth and nose protection with textiles, in which filters can be inserted and renewed. The choice of filters is made according to different protection levels. The filters come from the New Zealand company "LANACO", which produces filters from natural sheep's wool. The textile frames of the masks were machine-knitted with knitting structures that were developed in such a way that no residues remained during production. The filter holders, in turn, were printed with 3D-printers. May Bar Levav is of the opinion that by wearing a mask and the associated large-scale covering of the face, new forms of communication must be found. The unusual, colourful masks represent an extremely individual position, which alone provides an incentive for communication.
. 
.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . May Bar Levav
Body piece: Air We Wear | Oil Spill Mexico Mask, 2019
Tencel, Aloe Vera, Pla, wool filters.
28 x 18 x 16 cm
Photo by: Michael Shvadron
Industrial Knitting and 3D Printing.

May Bar Levav's work was created in response to the increasing air pollution and the corona pandemic, as well as the single-use products produced in this context. She complains that these products are not sustainable and that they are made from environmentally harmful plastic materials. For a long time, the mask was reserved for certain professional groups or was worn for religious reasons, but it has now become a general obligation. May Bar Levav hopes that even after the pandemic, the masks will continue to be worn as a preventive measure. It was her concern to use in her masks natural materials that are sustainably produced, as such materials are healthier for the body and facial skin, which are also protected by the mask. She combines three-dimensional structures for mouth and nose protection with textiles, in which filters can be inserted and renewed. The choice of filters is made according to different protection levels. The filters come from the New Zealand company "LANACO", which produces filters from natural sheep's wool. The textile frames of the masks were machine-knitted with knitting structures that were developed in such a way that no residues remained during production. The filter holders, in turn, were printed with 3D-printers. May Bar Levav is of the opinion that by wearing a mask and the associated large-scale covering of the face, new forms of communication must be found. The unusual, colourful masks represent an extremely individual position, which alone provides an incentive for communication.

 
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Jonas Niedermann. Object: Modular Shapes - Bleu, rose et opaline, 2020. Glass, brass.. 34 x 22 x 10 cm. Photo by: Cæciliie Philipa Vibe Pedersen. Blown, cut, coldworked, hot sculpted, kiln-formed & hot assembled.. 
. Jonas Niedermann is interested in the relationship between tradition and future in the handicrafts concerning glass. In his own work, he is on the one hand obliged to the great role models of the craft side, on the other hand, he is looking for new design possibilities. The objects in his series “Modular Shapes” are extremely elegant and pure with their organic, curved forms and their delicate, subtle colours. If the spectator changes the point of view, they too change their appearance - especially with regard to the colour gradient, the depth effect and the transparency. A particular concern of Jonas Niedermann is the three-dimensional colour grading. The shape of the works and the colour gradient increase the impression of the soft and delicate. The interior of the objects also seems to be in a subtle movement. Jonas Niedermann comments on his concern: "Uniting craft, art and design, I approach a contemporary, translucent and minimalistic sculpture."
. 
.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Jonas Niedermann
Object: Modular Shapes - Bleu, rose et opaline, 2020
Glass, brass.
34 x 22 x 10 cm
Photo by: Cæciliie Philipa Vibe Pedersen
Blown, cut, coldworked, hot sculpted, kiln-formed & hot assembled.

Jonas Niedermann is interested in the relationship between tradition and future in the handicrafts concerning glass. In his own work, he is on the one hand obliged to the great role models of the craft side, on the other hand, he is looking for new design possibilities. The objects in his series “Modular Shapes” are extremely elegant and pure with their organic, curved forms and their delicate, subtle colours. If the spectator changes the point of view, they too change their appearance - especially with regard to the colour gradient, the depth effect and the transparency. A particular concern of Jonas Niedermann is the three-dimensional colour grading. The shape of the works and the colour gradient increase the impression of the soft and delicate. The interior of the objects also seems to be in a subtle movement. Jonas Niedermann comments on his concern: "Uniting craft, art and design, I approach a contemporary, translucent and minimalistic sculpture."

 
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Mikuláš Brukner. Dress: Precarious situation, 2020. Viscose. 70 x 40 x 1 cm. Photo by: Marek Micánek. 3D-knitting. 
. The knitted dresses by Mikuláš Brukner from the series “Precarious Situation” are close-fitting and made of elastic rib knit. They feature exposed curved sections as a common characteristic. Dense areas of knitting alternate with areas in which the thread is loosely continued, creating transparency. The title of the series refers to the social group of the precariat with a very low or irregular income and financial insecurity. Mikuláš Brukner refers to studies by Guy Sanding Flossen, according to which the precariat is determined by negative as well as positive emotions that they experience in everyday life. For him, clothing is also a mediator and trigger of emotions. Holes were created in the knitting structure of the surface of individual items of clothing, through which the tension of precarious life is translated. The lack of rope symbolizes the lack of security. The colours for the collection range from those tones that represent calm to those that are associated with fear and aggression. The clothes thus incorporate the living conditions and emotions of this social group on several levels as inspiration for the designs and translate them into textile structures.
. 
.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Mikuláš Brukner
Dress: Precarious situation, 2020
Viscose
70 x 40 x 1 cm
Photo by: Marek Micánek
3D-knitting

The knitted dresses by Mikuláš Brukner from the series “Precarious Situation” are close-fitting and made of elastic rib knit. They feature exposed curved sections as a common characteristic. Dense areas of knitting alternate with areas in which the thread is loosely continued, creating transparency. The title of the series refers to the social group of the precariat with a very low or irregular income and financial insecurity. Mikuláš Brukner refers to studies by Guy Sanding Flossen, according to which the precariat is determined by negative as well as positive emotions that they experience in everyday life. For him, clothing is also a mediator and trigger of emotions. Holes were created in the knitting structure of the surface of individual items of clothing, through which the tension of precarious life is translated. The lack of rope symbolizes the lack of security. The colours for the collection range from those tones that represent calm to those that are associated with fear and aggression. The clothes thus incorporate the living conditions and emotions of this social group on several levels as inspiration for the designs and translate them into textile structures.

 
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Ruth Elvira Gilmour. Textile: Frayed Bodies: Loose Gatherings - Arm, 2020. Digital print on silk.. 62 x 43 x 0.01 cm. Photo by: Ruth Elvira Gilmour. 
. Ruth Gilmour deals in her work with her own vulnerability, which she addresses through craftsmanship. These are special issues in the current situation with regard to working from home under health considerations. Ruth Gilmour’s textile works question the unified and self-contained self and show the diversity of physical nature and the various concepts of being. Own experiences and memories are implemented in both traditionally crafted and modern digital processes. The starting point for the work is worried about the state of the world and one's own health, which should find a solution in the combination of body and material. Ruth Gilmour, therefore, uses materials such as silk with its transparency, delicacy, and strength to depict skin and bones, to symbolize sensitivity and contrasts. She sees the choice of silk as problematic, as silk on the one hand forms a pleasant, comforting material, but on the other hand, it is obtained by destroying the protective cocoons of other living beings. Her work is based on digital photographs of her own body, which are digitally printed on silk and then processed with a needle, whereby the image is deconstructed and alienated, the material being dissolved to form fringes, which in turn are reminiscent of old communication systems. By dividing, fraying, folding, and knotting, the body is multiplied by innumerable threads coloured by information. Similar to the body itself, the work is constantly changing.
. 
.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Ruth Elvira Gilmour
Textile: Frayed Bodies: Loose Gatherings - Arm, 2020
Digital print on silk.
62 x 43 x 0.01 cm
Photo by: Ruth Elvira Gilmour

Ruth Gilmour deals in her work with her own vulnerability, which she addresses through craftsmanship. These are special issues in the current situation with regard to working from home under health considerations. Ruth Gilmour’s textile works question the unified and self-contained self and show the diversity of physical nature and the various concepts of being. Own experiences and memories are implemented in both traditionally crafted and modern digital processes. The starting point for the work is worried about the state of the world and one's own health, which should find a solution in the combination of body and material. Ruth Gilmour, therefore, uses materials such as silk with its transparency, delicacy, and strength to depict skin and bones, to symbolize sensitivity and contrasts. She sees the choice of silk as problematic, as silk on the one hand forms a pleasant, comforting material, but on the other hand, it is obtained by destroying the protective cocoons of other living beings. Her work is based on digital photographs of her own body, which are digitally printed on silk and then processed with a needle, whereby the image is deconstructed and alienated, the material being dissolved to form fringes, which in turn are reminiscent of old communication systems. By dividing, fraying, folding, and knotting, the body is multiplied by innumerable threads coloured by information. Similar to the body itself, the work is constantly changing.

 
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Maximilian Jüttner. Furniture: Untitled, 2020. Walnut wood. Solid frame-filling construction.. 11 x 760 x 120 cm. Photo by: Wolfgang Pulfer. 
. Maximilian Jüttner's writing desk was created with the aim of presenting the craftsmanship via classic handicraft constructions, realizing a production in solid wood and at the same time conveying a modern character. The desk can be used both while sitting and standing and looks tidy without much effort. You can work standing at the desk when it is folded up. The combination of a narrow visible edge and a two-dimensional effect formed the main idea in the planning. The prism-shaped body made of American walnut rises on a conical frame made of the same wood in tunnel construction. The body of the desk consists of a frame-filling construction. The corner connections are classically planned with a mortise and tenon connection. The writing surface is covered with leather. The unostentatious piece of furniture changes its appearance by folding away two symmetrically constructed case doors. From a restrained standing desk, a writing desk at seat height can be created in two steps. There is also enough storage space due to drawers. A milled lighting (Multi White LED strip) above the work surface allows problem-free work even in the evening hours.
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.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Maximilian Jüttner
Furniture: Untitled, 2020
Walnut wood
Solid frame-filling construction.
11 x 760 x 120 cm
Photo by: Wolfgang Pulfer

Maximilian Jüttner's writing desk was created with the aim of presenting the craftsmanship via classic handicraft constructions, realizing a production in solid wood and at the same time conveying a modern character. The desk can be used both while sitting and standing and looks tidy without much effort. You can work standing at the desk when it is folded up. The combination of a narrow visible edge and a two-dimensional effect formed the main idea in the planning. The prism-shaped body made of American walnut rises on a conical frame made of the same wood in tunnel construction. The body of the desk consists of a frame-filling construction. The corner connections are classically planned with a mortise and tenon connection. The writing surface is covered with leather. The unostentatious piece of furniture changes its appearance by folding away two symmetrically constructed case doors. From a restrained standing desk, a writing desk at seat height can be created in two steps. There is also enough storage space due to drawers. A milled lighting (Multi White LED strip) above the work surface allows problem-free work even in the evening hours.

 
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Paula Repp Álvarez. Bowl: Untitled, 2020. Silver 925, slate.. 5 x 25 x 8 cm. Photo by: Luzia Huber. Raised and assembled.. Paula Repp-Alvarez’s silver objects have a restrained, simple shape and combine functionality and a certain sculptural monumentality. Paula Repp-Alvarez reduces the objects to basic forms and creates unusual but harmonious objects through the carefully considered use of surface structure, displacement, and combination of materials. She works with sheet silver, which she folds, bends, mills, solders, and deforms with a hammer. The striving for monumentality, for just a little too much, is intended. In the case of the bowl, her interest in ovals and the concern for multiple uses becomes obvious. This is implemented in the mixture of tray and bowl elements on the side, whereby the traditional shape of a bowl is lost. The pepper mill was designed with the desire for a sculptural shape and a deviation from the expected. In preparation of the work, paper models or paper cuts are created. In her work, Paula Repp Alvarez deals with her own impatience by conceiving objects that demand a lot of patience from her.
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.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Paula Repp Álvarez
Bowl: Untitled, 2020
Silver 925, slate.
5 x 25 x 8 cm
Photo by: Luzia Huber
Raised and assembled.
Paula Repp-Alvarez’s silver objects have a restrained, simple shape and combine functionality and a certain sculptural monumentality. Paula Repp-Alvarez reduces the objects to basic forms and creates unusual but harmonious objects through the carefully considered use of surface structure, displacement, and combination of materials. She works with sheet silver, which she folds, bends, mills, solders, and deforms with a hammer. The striving for monumentality, for just a little too much, is intended. In the case of the bowl, her interest in ovals and the concern for multiple uses becomes obvious. This is implemented in the mixture of tray and bowl elements on the side, whereby the traditional shape of a bowl is lost. The pepper mill was designed with the desire for a sculptural shape and a deviation from the expected. In preparation of the work, paper models or paper cuts are created. In her work, Paula Repp Alvarez deals with her own impatience by conceiving objects that demand a lot of patience from her.

 
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Thalea Schmalenberg. Vase: Resonance of Raw, 2020. Glass. 20 x 20 x 10 cm. Limited serie: 5/6
. Blown glass.. 
. In her project "The Resonance of Raw", Thalea Schmalenberg deals with the combination of traditional craftsmanship and regional materials on the appearance of products. The visibility of traces on the material due to the manual production method should lead to an awareness of traditional material qualities and manufacturing processes. These should encourage a more conscious consumption of everyday objects. The project is dedicated to the combination of basket weaving and glass. Basket weaving, through which storage and transport vessels were created, offered itself for the investigations as one of the oldest crafts. Handed down early is the combination of clay or glass vessels and wickerwork, with the latter forming a protective cover around the fragile vessel. Theresa Schmalenberg took up this idea and modified it to the extent that the once protective wickerwork cover becomes a form-giving element. Her aim was to try out the shape and process design of serial objects together with the glassmaker Peter Kuchinke. The wickerwork functioned as a molding tool in the manual glass production process. Their experiments testify to the influence of the different types of basketry with regard to structural properties, durability, and aesthetic effect. The glass is blown into the plaited shape and adopts its silhouette and surface texture.
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.  
.  Contact the artist for price  
.  . Thalea Schmalenberg
Vase: Resonance of Raw, 2020
Glass
20 x 20 x 10 cm
Limited serie: 5/6
Blown glass.

In her project "The Resonance of Raw", Thalea Schmalenberg deals with the combination of traditional craftsmanship and regional materials on the appearance of products. The visibility of traces on the material due to the manual production method should lead to an awareness of traditional material qualities and manufacturing processes. These should encourage a more conscious consumption of everyday objects. The project is dedicated to the combination of basket weaving and glass. Basket weaving, through which storage and transport vessels were created, offered itself for the investigations as one of the oldest crafts. Handed down early is the combination of clay or glass vessels and wickerwork, with the latter forming a protective cover around the fragile vessel. Theresa Schmalenberg took up this idea and modified it to the extent that the once protective wickerwork cover becomes a form-giving element. Her aim was to try out the shape and process design of serial objects together with the glassmaker Peter Kuchinke. The wickerwork functioned as a molding tool in the manual glass production process. Their experiments testify to the influence of the different types of basketry with regard to structural properties, durability, and aesthetic effect. The glass is blown into the plaited shape and adopts its silhouette and surface texture.

 
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Kazuhiro Toyama. Object: Nimbus, 2019. Stainless steel, aluminum, brass.. 48 x 78 x 46 cm. Photo by: Shinichi Ichikawa. From series: Biophilia. Welding, thermal spraying.. Kazuhiro Toyama
Object: Nimbus, 2019
Stainless steel, aluminum, brass.
48 x 78 x 46 cm
Photo by: Shinichi Ichikawa
From series: Biophilia
Welding, thermal spraying.
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