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Exhibition  /  13 Mar 2009  -  16 Mar 2009
Published: 06.03.2009
STUDIO GABI GREEN
Management:
Gabi Green
Christiana Jöckel. Piece: Untitled, 2008m. Mixed media. My perception of freedom of space within architecture and sculpture and my background of Goldsmithing has inspired my interest in spatial objects. 
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. I like to explore space by walking and travelling, by making my way through small alleys and pathways. Similarly I like to discover objects visually when handling them. 
. 
. In both cases motion is part of discovering.
. 
. When I am walking, my surroundings change as I move, but when I am working at my bench I like to send my mind on a journey; following uneven surfaces with changing directions that lead the eye around my objects. Light is sometimes shining through the surface. The eyes are invited to wander through the interior and into a labyrinth of undiscovered passageways.
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. Visualizing descriptions of architecture and transferring these ideas into another medium helps me to verbalize and translate abstract terms of space. I like to develop pure, simple spatial objects which gain their excitement from the interest of the viewer in exploring their different perspectives.. Christiana Jöckel
Piece: Untitled, 2008m
Mixed media
My perception of freedom of space within architecture and sculpture and my background of Goldsmithing has inspired my interest in spatial objects.

I like to explore space by walking and travelling, by making my way through small alleys and pathways. Similarly I like to discover objects visually when handling them.

In both cases motion is part of discovering.

When I am walking, my surroundings change as I move, but when I am working at my bench I like to send my mind on a journey; following uneven surfaces with changing directions that lead the eye around my objects. Light is sometimes shining through the surface. The eyes are invited to wander through the interior and into a labyrinth of undiscovered passageways.

Visualizing descriptions of architecture and transferring these ideas into another medium helps me to verbalize and translate abstract terms of space. I like to develop pure, simple spatial objects which gain their excitement from the interest of the viewer in exploring their different perspectives.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.

Intro
(...) The variety of materials, manufacturing techniques and processes available to an artist or designer in this field is far larger and of much greater potential than is indicated by the term ‘jewellery and silversmithing’ (...)
MA Jewellery, Silversmithing & Related Products
is the overall title of the course. This is however a very limited and traditional description when one considers the wide variety of products that are within the province of the designer who has knowledge and expertise in the area of personal ornaments, body signification and decorative metal objects. The variety of materials, manufacturing techniques and processes available to an artist or designer in this field is far larger and of much greater potential than is indicated by the term ‘jewellery and silversmithing’ and has some affinities with industrial design, fashion design, fine art and sculpture and is often informed by intellectual engagements like general philosophy, conceptualisation or critical theory.

Our course philosophy addresses the existing and potential relationships within this sector, and educates its students to recognize, identify, understand and operate within this diversity. The philosophy of the course is embodied within a structured project programme that requires students to address vocational and academic research in design by applying their developing abilities and interests to a wide range of issues. Design experiences include ideas generation focused through strategies for concept development, the analysis of design problems and reflection on the relationships between personal objectives, cultural values, market identities, prototyping techniques and new technologies, thus enhancing knowledge and understanding, as well as facilitating the formation of professional studio methodologies.

Remarks

Duration: 13.-16.3. 10-18 Hours

Jonathan Olliffe. Piece: In and up, 2008. Mixed media. My current collection explores the notions of ‘tension’ and ‘loss of tension’ within industrial and architectural structures that surround us in our everyday lives. I am influenced by architectural stadium structures, as much as by the complexities of internal spaces within the human body. 
. 
. I aim to challenge the concept of function in contemporary silver, questioning where the boundaries might lay between contemporary silverware and sculpture. 
. 
. Each of my pieces is a study into the formation of ‘tension’ with a strong emphasis on raising techniques that are being used in contemporary fine metalwork. This includes the traditional technique of anticlastic raising, forcing the metal in opposite directions. Other techniques include exposing the structure of the vessel, allowing the solder joints to be seen, and to emphasise the constructed forms by using industrial source material. Each object incorporates a range of non-precious and precious metals. I use fibreglass and a range of colour finishes contrasting and complimenting the precious quality of silver.. Jonathan Olliffe
Piece: In and up, 2008
Mixed media
My current collection explores the notions of ‘tension’ and ‘loss of tension’ within industrial and architectural structures that surround us in our everyday lives. I am influenced by architectural stadium structures, as much as by the complexities of internal spaces within the human body.

I aim to challenge the concept of function in contemporary silver, questioning where the boundaries might lay between contemporary silverware and sculpture.

Each of my pieces is a study into the formation of ‘tension’ with a strong emphasis on raising techniques that are being used in contemporary fine metalwork. This includes the traditional technique of anticlastic raising, forcing the metal in opposite directions. Other techniques include exposing the structure of the vessel, allowing the solder joints to be seen, and to emphasise the constructed forms by using industrial source material. Each object incorporates a range of non-precious and precious metals. I use fibreglass and a range of colour finishes contrasting and complimenting the precious quality of silver.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Sally Collins. Brooch: Giant brooch, 2008. Mixed media. The main focus of my work lies in the exploration of the evolution of form and ornamentation. In my most recent body of work ‘Make Do and Mend’ I have created a range of jewels from second-hand fabric, crochet, lace, heat treated copper and gold- plated elements. I aim to explore a traditionally domestic approach to recycling and sustainability, whilst following the progression of form and decoration through an evolution of scale, density and eccentricity. I create wearable compositions through the layering of pattern, colour and form with an emphasis on excess detailing and frills, taking pleasure in unusual or abundant combinations of fabrics and textures.. Sally Collins
Brooch: Giant brooch, 2008
Mixed media
The main focus of my work lies in the exploration of the evolution of form and ornamentation. In my most recent body of work ‘Make Do and Mend’ I have created a range of jewels from second-hand fabric, crochet, lace, heat treated copper and gold- plated elements. I aim to explore a traditionally domestic approach to recycling and sustainability, whilst following the progression of form and decoration through an evolution of scale, density and eccentricity. I create wearable compositions through the layering of pattern, colour and form with an emphasis on excess detailing and frills, taking pleasure in unusual or abundant combinations of fabrics and textures.
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Susanne Holzinger. Bracelet: Paper bevelled slate, 2008. Mixed media. I have always loved to work with paper. Paper is the most ordinary and multifunctional material of our times and I asked myself: can paper be jewellery?
. 
. Jewellery for me is sculptural art within the limits of wearability, volume and stability. By creating solid wood-like blocks of layered paper I designed a material that is suitable to fulfil these criteria. I want to stimulate the sense of touch as well as the eye. You can only suggest an aesthetic pleasure with the eye, but touch offers physical experience of the tactility of the pieces. Their surface is warm, dry and smooth and the organic shapes have a tactile sensual quality. When carving these paper blocks I draw the layered lines of coloured grain into organic forms. With every cut I control the lines in a desired direction. I refer to carving these paper blocks as drawing with the knife. During the carving process I feel the form with my fingertips and developed my sensitivity for the form in dialogue with exploring the material, which allows me to intuitively expose its essential qualities. My design process is based on my tactile sense of aesthetics and my physical perceptions. In this way, every piece is unique and can not ever be exactly duplicated.. Susanne Holzinger
Bracelet: Paper bevelled slate, 2008
Mixed media
I have always loved to work with paper. Paper is the most ordinary and multifunctional material of our times and I asked myself: can paper be jewellery?

Jewellery for me is sculptural art within the limits of wearability, volume and stability. By creating solid wood-like blocks of layered paper I designed a material that is suitable to fulfil these criteria. I want to stimulate the sense of touch as well as the eye. You can only suggest an aesthetic pleasure with the eye, but touch offers physical experience of the tactility of the pieces. Their surface is warm, dry and smooth and the organic shapes have a tactile sensual quality. When carving these paper blocks I draw the layered lines of coloured grain into organic forms. With every cut I control the lines in a desired direction. I refer to carving these paper blocks as drawing with the knife. During the carving process I feel the form with my fingertips and developed my sensitivity for the form in dialogue with exploring the material, which allows me to intuitively expose its essential qualities. My design process is based on my tactile sense of aesthetics and my physical perceptions. In this way, every piece is unique and can not ever be exactly duplicated.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Thayuta Trichaiyaporn. Piece: Untitled, 2008. Mixed media. I believe that people live and learn from experiences and move forward to their dreams and wishes. From my experience, my ‘time machine’ often takes me back to the amazing diary in my brain which is full of thoughts, dreams, reason and emotions, some good to keep and some hard to forget. Something deeply personal in me can recall a story which has occurred in the past and once happened this memory can last for a lifetime - I use this as my inspiration.
. 
. Human memory can broadly be defined as a function of the brain that gives us our ability to store and retrieve information. First there is memory that is full of imagination and from which daydreams are created, where the mind is drifting and is making up stories from past stories. The second is a complicated aspect, it is confusing and full of questions when I try to discover reasons, answers or conclusions. The third has all the information I have learnt since I was born, this is about my learning experience. 
. 
. I created jewellery pieces that explore these definitions by using combinations of colorful Acrylic and different types of metal, connecting each element together to tell a story.. Thayuta Trichaiyaporn
Piece: Untitled, 2008
Mixed media
I believe that people live and learn from experiences and move forward to their dreams and wishes. From my experience, my ‘time machine’ often takes me back to the amazing diary in my brain which is full of thoughts, dreams, reason and emotions, some good to keep and some hard to forget. Something deeply personal in me can recall a story which has occurred in the past and once happened this memory can last for a lifetime - I use this as my inspiration.

Human memory can broadly be defined as a function of the brain that gives us our ability to store and retrieve information. First there is memory that is full of imagination and from which daydreams are created, where the mind is drifting and is making up stories from past stories. The second is a complicated aspect, it is confusing and full of questions when I try to discover reasons, answers or conclusions. The third has all the information I have learnt since I was born, this is about my learning experience.

I created jewellery pieces that explore these definitions by using combinations of colorful Acrylic and different types of metal, connecting each element together to tell a story.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
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