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CHAINreaction, Handshakes at the Refinery

Exhibition  /  26 Mar 2021  -  17 Apr 2021
Published: 18.03.2021
CHAINreaction, Handshakes at the Refinery.
Refinery ArtSpace
Management:
Lloyd Harwood
.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.

Intro
CHAINreaction celebrates 10 years of the HANDSHAKE project. 49 artists who have been directly and indirectly associated with the project have all made a HANDSHAKE by contributing to a continuous necklace.

Artist list

Macarena Bernal, Renee Bevan, Becky Bliss, becky Bliss, Vernon Bowden, Antonia Boyle, Nadene Carr, Aphra Cheesman, Octavia Cook, Kristin D'Agostino, Andrea Daly, Judy Darragh, Peter Deckers, Gillian Deery, Sharon Fitness, Mandy Flood, Warwick Freeman, Karl Fritsch, Regan Gentry, Jack Hadley, Nick Hanton, Lisa Higgins, Sam Kelly, Jen Laracy, Fran Leitch, Gina Matchitt, Kelly McDonald, Neke Moa, Brendon Monson, Katie Pascoe, Ben Pearce, Nikki Perry, Alan Preston, Lynsay Raine, Sarah Read, Amelia Rothwell, Sandra Schmid, Kylie Sinkovich, Nadine Smith, Mia Straka, Simon Swale, Caroline Thomas, Susan Videler, Lisa Walker, Raewyn Walsh, Kim Whalen, Michelle Wilkinson, Jess Winchcombe, Kathryn Yeats, Nina van Duijnhoven
HANDSHAKE is a mentoring and exhibition project with a continuing progressive programme that over the years has benefited a great number of NZ emerging jewellery artists. It gave these artists extended creative energies and network opportunities. 
HANDSHAKE can be described as an experimental bridge that connects emerging artists with professional practice. Mentors came out from all over the world with a helping hand for those asking for it. The HANDSHAKE exhibitions were at national and international locations; with a couple at highly respected spaces. Its success can be described through its collective contribution and sharing nature. HANDSHAKE project is funded by Creative New Zealand and managed by MAKERS 101. ​


Opening: Saturday, 27 March 2021, 5:30 pm.
Artist Talk: Sunday, 28 March 1:30 – 2:30 pm.
Gallery Hours: Monday - Friday 10 am - 5 pm, Saturday 10 am.

>> Complete artist pieces and statements
 
Becky Bliss. Chain: Colour of change, 2021. Mild steel, paint.. 
. This work looks at the temperature change in the Pacific since 1900. Each meter of the necklace represents a meter of increase in sea level.. Becky Bliss
Chain: Colour of change, 2021
Mild steel, paint.

This work looks at the temperature change in the Pacific since 1900. Each meter of the necklace represents a meter of increase in sea level.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Aphra Cheesman. Chain: Chairs, 2021. Mild steel, furniture paint.. On Body
. 
. Like jewellery, chairs are made for the body and exist in close proximity to it. Chairs can act as a stand-in for people – an empty chair can hold the presence of a person who once occupied it. When chairs sit in a group there is a suggestion of multiple people together; conversations, collaborations, community. As artists and jewellers, we often spend time sitting and making in our workshops. For this project, I was interested to get to know the workshop chairs of my fellow HS6ers. I considered how our workshop chairs could offer an insight into every day and perhaps overlooked aspect of each maker’s practice. Each section of this neckpiece is made in response to an individual maker’s chair from HANDSHAKE 6. The final two sections, at each end of the necklace, respond to the chair of the artist whose work it is then connected to in CHAINreaction.  . Aphra Cheesman
Chain: Chairs, 2021
Mild steel, furniture paint.
On Body

Like jewellery, chairs are made for the body and exist in close proximity to it. Chairs can act as a stand-in for people – an empty chair can hold the presence of a person who once occupied it. When chairs sit in a group there is a suggestion of multiple people together; conversations, collaborations, community. As artists and jewellers, we often spend time sitting and making in our workshops. For this project, I was interested to get to know the workshop chairs of my fellow HS6ers. I considered how our workshop chairs could offer an insight into every day and perhaps overlooked aspect of each maker’s practice. Each section of this neckpiece is made in response to an individual maker’s chair from HANDSHAKE 6. The final two sections, at each end of the necklace, respond to the chair of the artist whose work it is then connected to in CHAINreaction. 

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Karl Fritsch. Chain: Untitled, 2021. Kelp, copper.. Karl Fritsch in front of his studioOn Body
. 
. Die Kette stink manchmal , smelly chain, smelly chain.. Karl Fritsch
Chain: Untitled, 2021
Kelp, copper.

Karl Fritsch in front of his studio
On Body

Die Kette stink manchmal , smelly chain, smelly chain.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Nik Hanton. Chain: Kin is Kween, 2021. Textile, PLA.. 360 cm Long. On Body
. 
. As individuals we're often focussed on our separateness. There is, however, a great value in acknowledging our interconnection with our kin. Those who walk with us and those that have gone before us.. Nik Hanton
Chain: Kin is Kween, 2021
Textile, PLA.
360 cm Long
On Body

As individuals we're often focussed on our separateness. There is, however, a great value in acknowledging our interconnection with our kin. Those who walk with us and those that have gone before us.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Nikki Perry. Chain: Manifest, 2021. Plastic, sterling silver.. 
. Manifest: not subject to misinterpretation, plain to see.
. This chain was born of rescued, discarded material that I found when walking in my neighbourhood. I obsessively dragged it home, determined to find ways to recycle, reinterpret, and wear.
. The responsibility of bringing it into this realm is heavy  and questionable. I am not trying to disguise it – intuitively
. working with it so it can be ‘seen’ in all the complexity of its contemporary existence.
. I am working/linking with nature as I find it but not using it’s perceived original materials. This creates a difficult dialogue and leads to a merry-go-round of unanswered questions.
. So – patiently allowing colour to dominate my reasoning and trusting the absurdity of this relationship, Manifest may lead to some answers and in the process, precious joy.. Nikki Perry
Chain: Manifest, 2021
Plastic, sterling silver.

Manifest: not subject to misinterpretation, plain to see.
This chain was born of rescued, discarded material that I found when walking in my neighbourhood. I obsessively dragged it home, determined to find ways to recycle, reinterpret, and wear.
The responsibility of bringing it into this realm is heavy  and questionable. I am not trying to disguise it – intuitively
working with it so it can be ‘seen’ in all the complexity of its contemporary existence.
I am working/linking with nature as I find it but not using it’s perceived original materials. This creates a difficult dialogue and leads to a merry-go-round of unanswered questions.
So – patiently allowing colour to dominate my reasoning and trusting the absurdity of this relationship, Manifest may lead to some answers and in the process, precious joy.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Caroline Thomas. Chain: Isambard, 2021. Polymer clay, oxidised copper wire, 18ct gold wedding ring.. 
. This chain is inspired by the historic tradition of Victorian mourning jewellery, specifically that made from Whitby jet which was highly prized in the second half of the nineteenth century in England. Ornate and heavy chains, brooches and earrings were complemented by heavy black dresses, shoes, umbrellas, bonnets and veils. 
. Taking the jet jewellery as inspiration I played with scale, decoration and the abstract notion of mourning and its heavy emotional weight.  My chain is on a large and impractical scale that can be worn but you would never forget you had it on, rather as the memory of a deceased loved one can never be erased from your life.
. One end of the chain is connected to its neighbour by means of a wedding ring which, until she died just over six months ago, was worn by my mother for nearly sixty years.. Caroline Thomas
Chain: Isambard, 2021
Polymer clay, oxidised copper wire, 18ct gold wedding ring.

This chain is inspired by the historic tradition of Victorian mourning jewellery, specifically that made from Whitby jet which was highly prized in the second half of the nineteenth century in England. Ornate and heavy chains, brooches and earrings were complemented by heavy black dresses, shoes, umbrellas, bonnets and veils. 
Taking the jet jewellery as inspiration I played with scale, decoration and the abstract notion of mourning and its heavy emotional weight.  My chain is on a large and impractical scale that can be worn but you would never forget you had it on, rather as the memory of a deceased loved one can never be erased from your life.
One end of the chain is connected to its neighbour by means of a wedding ring which, until she died just over six months ago, was worn by my mother for nearly sixty years.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
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