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Ede Kurrel: Butterfly Catcher

Exhibition  /  30 May 2009  -  30 Aug 2009
Published: 03.06.2009
Estonian Museum of Applied Art and Design
Management:
Merike Alber
Ede Kurrel. Brooch: Bloom of Happiness, 1975. Silver, gold, turquoises. Ede Kurrel
Brooch: Bloom of Happiness, 1975
Silver, gold, turquoises
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.

Intro
(...) Few artists have the privilege to create traditions, and Ede Kurrel (1909-1991) was one such artist. Her work is an aperture through which we can view the evolution of Estonian jewellery art over many decades. (...)

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Ede Kurrel
Few artists have the privilege to create traditions, and Ede Kurrel (1909-1991) was one such artist.
Her work is an aperture through which we can view the evolution of Estonian jewellery art over many decades. Kurrel was among the first generation of Estonian artists, and was in fact one of the first professionals in this field to receive her art education in Estonia.
Her career started in 1930, when Kurrel, while only a student in State School of Arts and Crafts was a participant in the first applied art exhibition, and continued without hiatus for more than fifty years. Her work received recognition at home and abroad.
Her jewellery is characterized by its eternal femininity and elegance. She subscribed to the credo that an ornament must be an ornament, and adorn the person wearing it. This is the reason Kurrel’s work seems so timelessly modern. Precious stones play an important role in Kurrel’s work; indeed she is considered Estonia’s greatest artist in terms of use of precious stones. There is probably no gemstone the artist could not work or make shine. Her fingers transformed even humble field stone into worthy gemstones.
Kurrel’s tour de force can be considered the necklace entitled “Mustad liblikad / Black Butterflies”; (silver, gold, niello, 1978) – this fine piece of jewellery, done in freehand, is undoubtedly part of the vanguard of Estonian jewellery art. Although Kurrel always stayed aware of the times and the fashion – capricious and quickly changing phenomena that they are – she also remained true to her own principles. Kurrel’s miniature, delicate dishes and bowls are very close to her jewellery. She started creating them on a more consistent basis in the 1960s, but there are a few examples from earlier on. She achieved her most painterly and evocative expression using an electro-erosion technique, which she used to coax forth a power that was outright lyrical. Knowing that there are no readymade formulas in art, she always strove to try new materials and experiment with new techniques in her unending quest for new creative challenges.

Merike Alber
Ede Kurrel. Pendant: Black Butterflies, 1978. Silver, gold, niello. Ede Kurrel
Pendant: Black Butterflies, 1978
Silver, gold, niello
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Ede Kurrel. Bracelet: Untitled, 1945. Silver, filigree. Ede Kurrel
Bracelet: Untitled, 1945
Silver, filigree
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Ede Kurrel. Bracelet: Bracelet with malachites, 1947. Oxidised silver, wire braid, embossing. Ede Kurrel
Bracelet: Bracelet with malachites, 1947
Oxidised silver, wire braid, embossing
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Ede Kurrel. Vase: Green Bloom, 1984. Copper, enamel. Ede Kurrel
Vase: Green Bloom, 1984
Copper, enamel
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Ede Kurrel. Necklace: Wreath, 1977. Silver, gold, enamel. Ede Kurrel
Necklace: Wreath, 1977
Silver, gold, enamel
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
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