Back

Green Enigma by Marianne Schliwinski

Exhibition  /  10 Oct 2014  -  16 Nov 2014
Published: 20.10.2014
Oratorio di San Rocco
Place
Via S. Lucia
35139 -  Padova
ITALY
Mail:
schmuckE-mailgalerie-spektrum.de
serviziomostreE-mailcomune.padova.it
Phone:
+39 049 820 4527
.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.

Intro
A solo exhibition by Marianne Schliwinsk presenting an overview of her work along 50 years. Since the sixties that the artist expresses herself through jewellery and the changes along her career are notable. Living nowadays in Munich the artist found an endless source of inspiration in the Garda Lake.

Artist list

Marianne Schliwinski
Green Enigma
Marianne Schliwinski’s colourful stories

Marianne Schliwinski chose jewellery as the privileged medium to express her creativity since the Sixties. Jewels are intended as means to give birth to an interaction of emotions, memories and thoughts, through the study, apparently more intuitive than rational, of the relationships between materials and colours, always with a focus on the body as a special space to bring her work to life and make it interact with the users. The need to recount the individuals, society, past and present alike, nature, beauty, in a sort of romantic melancholy, discretely emerges from several of her works, extending then to photography, rich of suggestions and often engaged in a dialogue with jewels, and also in her several installations interacting with the surrounding space, with their warm colours, materials and shapes.

Thanks to the teachings of Hadfried Rinke, who encouraged young Marianne to approach jewellery in 1964, the artist developed a true passion for the jewellery world, realising that handcraftsmanship cannot be detached from the creative process and artistic research, but it should actually valorised by it. Her early works are characterised by the use of precious materials: golden necklaces with linear threads are enriched by pearls and rhodolite; silver bracelets and rings, with their smooth and rounded surface, feature parallel lines or transversal bands highlighted by the use of copper and gold, in a variety of chromatic patterns aimed at emphasizing form and the reflection of light (1966, 67, 68, 74, 78, 79).

Schliwinski uses silver also to create objects, bowls and glasses, boxes and cups characterised by clean, sharp and essential shapes, with a particular focus on the light vibrations on their surface, always bearing a touch of colour achieved through the addition of discrete and elegant gold and copper inserts. Geometrical shapes are clearly evoked by her works of ’78, ’79, ’81, such as Winkel, Tasche, Kleiner kimono, Kleiner fluegrl, Kimono II, Konkav, Himmel uber Wien, made in copper and silver, where the different chromatic patterns of the metals emphasize their structural textures, the triangle being the basic and most prominent element therein. The artist is equally fascinated by the so-called “objets trouvès”, in an attempt to fix their history and memories, using them as a tool to recount emotions and feelings on one side and, on the other one, as elements to trace the path of a new identity, bound towards new findings and discoveries, imbued with an unprecedented power given by the fact of being discarded objects, thrown away and, therefore, useless, coming at the end of the function they were designed for.

The curious eye of the artist looks backwards then, to a fascinating past which re-emerges in fragments of discarded gilded frames, mirrors, porcelains, glasses, coral, fragments of portraits. Schliwinski shows a savvy use of this material, and here lies the true value of her work, by exploiting their nostalgic aura and capturing the viewers in a re-created atmosphere of times long gone, harmoniously rendered through a language whose contemporaneity is evident from the design solutions adopted by the artist as well as from the use of modern materials.  

Collecting and preserving are the pre-conditions to give shape to ideas, to materialise inspirations and translate memories and feelings into precious artefacts. Starting in the 80’s, Marianne began to design and create her works by using a variety of fragments and materials, a true challenge for the artist, whose work follows a number of themes that allow her creativity to experiment different solutions on the same objects, finding similar or sometimes completely different solutions. Here, we would like to mention the installation …how finally I have lost my heart (1984-1987), the series Crosses (1984-1986), Grandmother’s and grandfather’s bed (1985-1998), Stones (1986-2014), Flowers (1993-1996),  Bestiarium (2004), 20th century icons (2007)… Glass, wood, paper, porcelain as well as lacquer, rubber and gold leaf are skilfully combined with iron, aluminium, steel, mirror, silver, gold and various stones, originally arranged in compositions that abound with colour and poetry, aptly designed to interact with the human body and enter into synergy with users. Glass deserves a special mention, as Marianne considers it extremely relevant in her production. She loves a kind of glass which is broken, discarded, thrown away, worn by the action of weather, collected while strolling around Murano, along the banks or in landfills. The glass rejected by the sea finds new life in her creations by triggering a creative cycle which goes from its finding to rebirth. Due to its degrees of transparency and infinite range of colours, glass allows for an unusual and particular vision of whatever lies beyond, offering viewers a different perspective of reality, often an enchanted one. So, old pictures, printed papers, fragments of painted tin and second-hand clothes are given new appearance by the overlapping glass, which is manipulated, processed and re-created by the artist, leading viewers towards an original and imaginary world, bordering into fantasy, yet, in some way, always sticking to reality.
 
Marianne Schliwinski has the ability to create magic compositions, in which fragments of glass, carefully selected, absorb light and colours, conveying the poetic world that the artist intends to introduce us into. The brooch Enigma Green, for instance, is made with a fragment of glass worn by the action of water, salt, sand and wind, and represents a secret message in a bottle, concealed by the sealing wax, then entirely left to the sea. The artist recounts collective as well as personal and intimate stories, exemplified by each and every of her creations. Who will find the bottle? Who will be able to find the message, read and understand it?

Whereas the series 20th century icons is a clear homage to a number of illustrious characters who are admired by the artist thanks to their contribution to society and history, it is worth mentioning here that her creations never avoid recounting, the need to tell a story, a place, an emotion. The ironic and lively series Heart, also through the titles of different brooches or installations, recount the joy de vivre, love and passions, while in Stones the artist, through the use of cardboard, steel and gold leaf, creates brooches, hand-size objects and boxes, remindful of the rough and undulated surface of rocks as well as the smooth and almost shiny layer of stones, with their gentle and round shapes, as found in riverbeds.

Flowers instead introduces us into a world of secret gardens, where flowers made of colourful glasses are plucked and arranged into a series of microscopic and essential vases, which deliciously group them together as to create an antidote far away from Nature, a protected, silent and safe living space. The contrast between the natural environment and the contemporary urban civilization, characterised by anxiety, confusion, frantic rhythms and dizziness, is another issue profoundly perceived by the artist, who finds in the garden the most natural and immediate shelter to regain a personal balance, both emotional and rational. Love for nature, green and water is a recurrent theme in her work. Marianne spent over twenty years in Kiel, on the Baltic Sea, and now that she lives in Munich, she has found an endless source of inspiration, concentration and calm in the Garda Lake, with its blue waters and lush vegetation. Grandmother’s Bed and Grandfather’s Bed, thanks to the use of fragments of old frames and mouldings in lacquered wood, gold leaf, fine silver, iron chains and fabrics, lead us to a world where personal and recent memories are mixed, where the viewers can recall their memories and, therefore, share them with the artist’s nostalgic .  
 
While the series Bestiarium evokes exotic animals, treasures and stories imported by Christopher Columbus after the discovery of America, the numerous works dedicated to Cities reveal unique atmospheres through their signs, shapes and colours, testifying Schliwinski’s ability to confer her personal interpretation, sensations and memories to each one of them.
The passion for photography, another important medium used by Marianne to express her creativity, allows Schliwinski to fix in time images and fragments of reality, where the photographic medium is purely functional to reveal whatever is strictly necessary to convey the artist’s vision as well as her personal interpretation of what is captured through the lenses. Her pictures thus become truly pictorial expressions, where colours play a prominent role, even when they are soft and subdued, while the form, captured in details, is often magnified or “modified” thanks to a skilful angle view, presenting the public with suspended and estranged visions. The creative process here is not dissimilar from her work on jewellery: start from an object, contaminate it, spray it with melancholy and poetry and retell it to whoever is willing to access the artist’s poetry and share its beauty and emotions with her, always keeping a sincere interest and sensitivity, with an open heart and mind.  

Mirella Cisotto Nalon
Oratorio di San Rocco.
Oratorio di San Rocco

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Marianne Schliwinski: Verde Enigma e Altre Storie
Juergen Eickhoff
2014
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Display of the exhibition.
Display of the exhibition

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Display of the exhibition.
Display of the exhibition

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Display of the exhibition.
Display of the exhibition

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Display of the exhibition.
Display of the exhibition

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Display of the exhibition.
Display of the exhibition

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Display of the exhibition.
Display of the exhibition

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Display of the exhibition.
Display of the exhibition

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Display of the exhibition.
Display of the exhibition

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Display of the exhibition.
Display of the exhibition

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Display of the exhibition.
Display of the exhibition

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Display of the exhibition.
Display of the exhibition

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Display of the exhibition.
Display of the exhibition

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Display of the exhibition.
Display of the exhibition

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Display of the exhibition.
Display of the exhibition

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Display of the exhibition.
Display of the exhibition

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Appreciate APPRECIATE