Back
HDK_OpenCall_PositionforProfessor.

Japan Retur

Exhibition  /  05 Oct 2018  -  28 Feb 2019
Published: 19.10.2018
Exhibition venue..
Exhibition venue.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.

Intro
A hammers dance on silver. The sound of a planer, slowly and precisely, pulling the longest wood shaving from a huge plank of wood. Concentration and repetition. Practise and lots of patience. New ideas and old traditions.
Professional wanderlust, the search for Japanese design aesthetics and strong crafts traditions are the focal point of the forthcoming exhibition Japan Retur at A. Petersen on Kløvermarksvej. Here you’ll find 43 projects created by more than 60 Danish and Japanese craftsmen and designers, for whom the curiosity and the desire for cooperation have been a major driver.
The projects show fertile meetings between Danish and Japanese ceramists, textile designers, photographers, cabinetmakers, silversmiths and design companies. Among the projects you will also find a Japanese wallpaper master, a bamboo wicker worker and a bookbinder. The exhibition includes stories about Mid Jutland socks, about the Japanese fascination of the Danish iconic Irma girl, about the long lasting and close ties between a Danish and a Japanese ceramist. Just to mention a few.

The 43 projects have all been part of a special focus on the meeting between Danish and Japanese crafts and design in 2017, initiated by the Danish Arts Foundation. Anne Blond, chairman of The Danish Arts Foundation’s Committee for Craft and Design Project Funding:
-­‐ With the Japan Retur-­‐exhibition, we get a rare opportunity to understand what the craftsmen and designers who took part in the project, have gained from the cultural exchange. The exhibition demonstrates how important and fruitful it is to facilitate the option for artisans within all fields to seek inspiration and get the opportunity to upgrade and learn new skills, to bring arts and crafts to new levels.


Stories about Japan
Conservator Anne Simonsen participates in the exhibition with the story of an old Japanese wallpaper, hidden in a building in Copenhagen. Anne Simonsen tells:
To identify just the right Japanese craft expertise and be able to invite him to Denmark and show him one of the world's best-­‐preserved Japanese wallpapers, has been absolutely outstanding.
During the visit of the Japanese wallpaper-­‐master, we hosted a workshop, in which everybody with an interest could join and get an insight into the delicate craftsmanship.
A craft technique demanding precision and carefulness to a degree, I have never experienced elsewhere.
At the 
exhibition it will be possible to experience a print of the wallpaper, as well as join Anne Simonsen on a tour to Brønnums Hus to watch the original restored wallpaper.
 
Designer Louise Campbell has travelled several times in Japan and noted the time as an important concept in Japanese culture. Campbell translated this to a work, installed at the 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art in Kanazawa, Japan. The wave-­‐work was her interpretation of the theme of time:
This wave, this landscape, is made by my hands during a long, dark winter. My wave has dictated its own pace and developed between my hands through many hours of work. This is my reaction towards the accelerating pace of time. It contains the slowness of it, Louise Campbell says about the wave, which is now being re-­‐installed for the exhibition Japan Retur and, like part of the work.

The Repetive Clean by designer Henrik Vibskov, is exhibited for the first time in Denmark since Kanazawa.


The flip side of aesthetics
Japan is known for the aesthetic purity and beauty, and not for the ugly and messy. We most often get the image of a country appreciating skilled craftsmanship to a degree where people mastering traditional craftsmanship are appointed as National treasures.
However, the Japan Retur-­‐exhibition also shows what can be denoted as the flip side of the traditional Japanese culture. The raw and unfinished are presented side by side with the refined and distinguished. The clothes-­‐ and textile designers Siff Pristed and Emilie Carlsen, have photographed Japanese fashion models at the harbour of Tokyo among scrap, rattle and old Japanese harbour-­‐workers without teeth.
Glass designer Maria Koshenkova has studied the Japanese bondage technique Shibari and reproduced it in her glassworks. Designer Øivind Slaatto, registered a wide range of ugly and scrabby aspects also part of Japanese culture -­‐ and learned that the Japanese adore Danish culture and welfare at the same level as we in Denmark admire Japanese design.


An experience richer -- please be informed
The exhibition is accompanied by a dissemination program with guided tours, design talks, lectures and workshops. In November, the audience can attend and participate in the creation of an on-­‐site work in the project R / LOOM by architect Johna Hansen and the weaver Yuko Yokota. And in January, we invite you to another weaving workshop by Rosa Tolnov Clausen, holding the Weaving Kiosk -­‐ an open invitation to weave together with others.
In October, graphic designer and design manager Marie d'Origny Lübecker will tell about her meeting with the Japanese designer Kenya Hara, founder of the Muji department stores. Hara has taught his theory of Ex-­‐formation at the University of Tokyo, thus influencing the upcoming generation of Japanese designers.


Background
In 2017, Denmark and Japan celebrated the 150th anniversary of diplomatic relations between the two countries. In this context, the Danish Arts Foundation, Committee for Crafts and Design Project Funding, launched two initiatives: an exhibition in Kanazawa, Japan showing Danish and Japanese design, curated by Danish designer Cecilie Manz, as well as funds for artisans and designers with the desire to exchange knowledge and collaborate with Japanese professionals.
The results, experiences and ideas that have emerged in the wake of this effort are displayed at the Japan Retur-­‐exhibition.


Artist, designer and architecture list:
Aggebo & Henriksen & Yasuko Uozumi, Akiko Kuwahata, Anders Lunderskov, Finn Kilbuck Johansen, Jacob Ulrich, John Bøge, Ken Winther Christensen, Rasmus Fenhann, Søren Risvang Sørensen & Teis Dich Abrahamsen, Anne Black & Akira Minagawa, Anne Fabricius Møller, Anne Mette Hjortshøj & Iwami Shinsuke, Anne Jonstrup Simonsen, Anne Tophøj, Anni Vestergaard & Louise Hold Sidenius, Birgitte Christens, Charlotte Hjorth-Rohde, Ned Cantrell, Emil Borregaard, Emilie Carlsen – FLOCK, Siff Pristed Nielsen – FLOCK, Foreningen Butik for Borddækning, Ibata Katsue & Igata Nobuyuki, Foreningen Butik for Borddækning & Momoo Omuro, Gregory Hamilton Miller, Gurli Elbækgaard, Henrik Vibskov, Ida Wieth, Jakob Ingemansson & Mika Katarina Friis, Jan Machenhauer, Janne K. Hansen & Helen Clara Hemsley, Johanne Jahncke & Rick Gerner, Johna Hansen & Yuko Yokota, Kaori Juzu & Per Suntum, Liv Caroline og Louise Jacobsen, Laura Locher, Line Depping & Jakob Jørgensen, Louise Campbell, Maria Hagerup, Maria Koshenkova, Marie d’Origny Lübecker, Marie Frøhlich, Peter Hiort-Lorenzen, Johannes Foersom, Ane Lykke, Rosa Tolnov Clausen, Sky Lucy Young, Øivind Slaatto, Pernille Snedker Hansen, Tine Wessel, Tora Urup og Yuki Ferdinandsen.

The exhibition is presented in collaboration with the Danish Arts Foundation, which has also supported all the projects in the exhibition.

The short videos are all in Danish and will be subtitled (in English) asap.

Hours

Wednesday - Friday: 12 – 6 pm.
Saturday and Sunday: 10 am – 4 pm.

Opening

Thursday, October 4, 2018 at 5-­‐7pm.
Janne K Hansen. Brooch: Looking Back, Without Seeing .- Nara #3, 2018. Selenite, fairtrade 18ct gold, sterling silver, fine silver.. 4 x 6 x 14 cm. Janne K Hansen
Brooch: Looking Back, Without Seeing .- Nara #3, 2018
Selenite, fairtrade 18ct gold, sterling silver, fine silver.
4 x 6 x 14 cm
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Helen Clara Hemsley. Necklace: A pilgrimage of stitching 1, 2018. Necklace: Kimono scraps, Japanese silk, scrap fabrics, polyester batting, embroidery thread, sewing thread, knitting yarn, horsehair, press-stud.. 46 x 20 x 0.5 cm. Photo by: James Bates. Helen Clara Hemsley
Necklace: A pilgrimage of stitching 1, 2018
Necklace: Kimono scraps, Japanese silk, scrap fabrics, polyester batting, embroidery thread, sewing thread, knitting yarn, horsehair, press-stud.
46 x 20 x 0.5 cm
Photo by: James Bates
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Work by Emil Borregaard..
Work by Emil Borregaard.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Work by Ned Cantrell..
Work by Ned Cantrell.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Work by Birgitte Christens..
Work by Birgitte Christens.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Work by Johannes Foersom..
Work by Johannes Foersom.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Work by Sky Lucy Young..
Work by Sky Lucy Young.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Exhibition venue..
Exhibition venue.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Exhibition venue..
Exhibition venue.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Exhibition venue..
Exhibition venue.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Exhibition venue..
Exhibition venue.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Exhibition venue..
Exhibition venue.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Exhibition venue..
Exhibition venue.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Appreciate APPRECIATE