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Jewellery by Iris Bodemer and Ute Eitzenhöfer

Exhibition  /  01 Jun 2014  -  14 Sep 2014
Published: 21.05.2014
Jewellery by Iris Bodemer and Ute Eitzenhöfer.
CODA Museum
Management:
Drs. Carin E.M. Reinders
.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.

Intro
CODA Museum presents the jewellery of Iris Bodemer and Ute Eitzenhöfer in the exhibition "Jewellery by Iris Bodemer & Ute Eitzenhöfer". Expression, experiment and exploration play an important role in the work of both artists.

Artist list

Iris Bodemer, Ute Eitzenhöfer
From 1 June until 14 September 2014 inclusive, CODA Museum will bring together the jewellery of Iris Bodemer (1970) and Ute Eitzenhöfer (1969) in the exhibition Jewellery: Iris Bodemer & Ute Eitzenhöfer. Both Bodemer en Eitzenhöfer approach the materials they use without discriminating between what is valuable and what is worthless. Expression, experiment and exploration play an important role in the work and development of both artists.

Iris Bodemer
Iris Bodemer’s jewellery can be both sensuous and rough. Patterns and reliefs have been playing an important role in her work for some time. She works with a broad gamut of materials, ranging from gold and gemstones to rubber and string, with no hierarchical relation between the materials she uses to achieve her final form. Over the past few years, the choice of material has gained importance. In order to achieve the right combination of shapes, lines and textures, Bodemer explores the essence of the material and the object as it develops. The recurring use of string and wool goes back to a personal story. At one point, she inherited a ring that had belonged to her great-grandmother. It had been her husband’s wedding ring, which she wanted to wear after his death, as was the custom in those days. However, the ring was much too big for her. Because she did not want to have the ring made smaller by a goldsmith, she wound some wool around it, reducing the diameter, so she could wear the ring. Iris Bodemer considers it a family tradition, which she has applied several times over the course of the years. In 2004, for example, she made a series of rings and wound string around the ring and the stone until they looked like ‘traditional’ rings with a stone. It is not just Iris Bodemer’s jewels that are autonomous art objects. Her method is also one of autonomy, of independence or, as jewellery expert Marjan Unger puts it in an article: “Iris Bodemer does not refer to predecessors or contemporaries. She completely follows her own course. But she does not make autonomous works just so they can be exhibited. Her jewels are essentially made for the human body and, as such, come to life when worn.” Iris Bodemer was awarded with the Herbert Hofmann Prize in March 2014.


Ute Eitzenhöfer
At first glance, Ute Eitzenhöfer’s jewellery appears to have been made to wear and to adorn. Although she claims to be indifferent in discussions about wearability and jewellery as an autonomous art form, her jewels certainly do tell a story. They contemplate and criticise modern society and encourage observers to think about the relationship between people and materialistic things, the meaning of everyday objects and how we treat them. The publication Ute Eitzenhöfer – Schmuck-Jewellery from 2013 does not only give an overview of her work: questions like What habits do people actually have? What is valuable? What is meaningful? What would happen if everyone made things that do not perish but exist forever? How do we influence the world? What will be?, printed in black and white, also indicate her point of departure. Moreover, the questions shed light on her combination of materials. In a number of jewels we see precious metals and gemstones combined with bottle caps, tubes or packaging. These materials symbolise superficial beauty, are mass-produced and discarded just as easily. The combination with other materials in Eitzenhöfer’s jewellery gives them a different ‘value’.
Since the time when she worked as a professor in Idar-Oberstein (2005), Eitzenhöfer has been using more and more gems in her jewellery in order to, as she phrases it, represent the inestimable value of nature. Her jewels provoke thoughts on the subjects addressed by their maker. Eitzenhöfer: “It is not just about the value of objects but chiefly about how we treat them.”

Remarks

CODA director Carin Reinders cordially invites you to attend the opening on 1 June at 14h30 at CODA Museum.

After the opening CODA serves a summer buffet (€ 15,- p.p). Please let us know if you will be attending the opening at 0031 55 5268565 or aanmeldingen@coda-apeldoorn.nl. Please state clearly whether or not you will be making use of the buffet.
Iris Bodemer. Brooch: Untitled, 1997. Gold 900, rubellite, rubber, tape, staples. 8,5 x 12 x 3 cm. Schmuckmuseum Pforzheim
. Photo Julian Kirschler. Iris Bodemer
Brooch: Untitled, 1997
Gold 900, rubellite, rubber, tape, staples
8,5 x 12 x 3 cm
Schmuckmuseum Pforzheim
Photo Julian Kirschler

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Iris Bodemer. Neckpiece: Untitled, 2002. Silver, pearls. 7,5 x 8 x 3,5 cm. Photo Julian Kirschler. Iris Bodemer
Neckpiece: Untitled, 2002
Silver, pearls
7,5 x 8 x 3,5 cm
Photo Julian Kirschler
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Iris Bodemer. Neckpiece: Untitled, 2004. Gold 999, coral, serpentine, sponge, string, textile, rubber. 19x19x3 cm. Photographer: Julian Kirschler. Iris Bodemer
Neckpiece: Untitled, 2004
Gold 999, coral, serpentine, sponge, string, textile, rubber
19x19x3 cm
Photographer: Julian Kirschler
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Iris Bodemer. Brooch: Ingredients, 2008. Coral, brush, wall paint, gold 750, cotton. 18 x 8,5 x 1,5 cm. Foto Julian Kirschler. Iris Bodemer
Brooch: Ingredients, 2008
Coral, brush, wall paint, gold 750, cotton
18 x 8,5 x 1,5 cm
Foto Julian Kirschler
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Iris Bodemer. Neckpiece: Ingredients, 2008. Agate, copper, lemon, reconstructed coral, wool. 25x17x2,5 cm. Photographer: Julian Kirschler. Iris Bodemer
Neckpiece: Ingredients, 2008
Agate, copper, lemon, reconstructed coral, wool
25x17x2,5 cm
Photographer: Julian Kirschler
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Iris Bodemer. Neckpiece: Untitled, 2012. Bronze, sapphire, slate with pyrite, agate, fossil, tourmaline, mounting adhesive. 18 x 33 x 1,5 cm. Photo Julian Kirschler. Iris Bodemer
Neckpiece: Untitled, 2012
Bronze, sapphire, slate with pyrite, agate, fossil, tourmaline, mounting adhesive
18 x 33 x 1,5 cm
Photo Julian Kirschler
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Iris Bodemer. Neckpiece: Untitled, 2012. Silver, tourmaline, rutilated quartz, mounting adhesive. 27x21x5 cm. Photographer: Julian Kirschler. Iris Bodemer
Neckpiece: Untitled, 2012
Silver, tourmaline, rutilated quartz, mounting adhesive
27x21x5 cm
Photographer: Julian Kirschler
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Iris Bodemer. Brooch: Relief I _ 20 Brooches, 2013. Silver. 36,5x26x1 cm. Photographer: Julian Kirschler. Iris Bodemer
Brooch: Relief I _ 20 Brooches, 2013
Silver
36,5x26x1 cm
Photographer: Julian Kirschler
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Ute Eitzenhöfer. Piece: Plombenkette, 1998. 925 silver, string. Necklace and two rings
. © Schmuckmuseum Pforzheim
. Photo Petra Jaschke. Ute Eitzenhöfer
Piece: Plombenkette, 1998
925 silver, string
Necklace and two rings
© Schmuckmuseum Pforzheim
Photo Petra Jaschke

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Ute Eitzenhöfer. Necklace: Eyecontourbalmbeautyflashmoisturelotioncollier, 2002. Cream tubes (PP), thread, 925 silver, agate. Photography: Julian Kirschler. Ute Eitzenhöfer
Necklace: Eyecontourbalmbeautyflashmoisturelotioncollier, 2002
Cream tubes (PP), thread, 925 silver, agate
Photography: Julian Kirschler
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Ute Eitzenhöfer. Brooch: Little shampoo brooches, 2002. Fragments of shampoo caps engraved (PP), rhodolite, 900 gold. Photography: © Schmuckmuseum PforzheimWinfried Reinhardt. Ute Eitzenhöfer
Brooch: Little shampoo brooches, 2002
Fragments of shampoo caps engraved (PP), rhodolite, 900 gold
Photography: © Schmuckmuseum PforzheimWinfried Reinhardt
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Ute Eitzenhöfer. Brooch: Untitled, 2011. Labradorite, Marble, 925 silver, sulphured, stainless steel. Photo Lichtblick Fotodesign, Jürgen und Hiltraud Cullmann. Ute Eitzenhöfer
Brooch: Untitled, 2011
Labradorite, Marble, 925 silver, sulphured, stainless steel
Photo Lichtblick Fotodesign, Jürgen und Hiltraud Cullmann
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Ute Eitzenhöfer. Neckpiece: Behind, 2013. Rock crystal (clear quartz) with agate border, Makrolon®, Keshi pearls, 925 silver, sulphured, plastic (from packaging). Photography: Michael Müller. Ute Eitzenhöfer
Neckpiece: Behind, 2013
Rock crystal (clear quartz) with agate border, Makrolon®, Keshi pearls, 925 silver, sulphured, plastic (from packaging)
Photography: Michael Müller
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Ute Eitzenhöfer. Brooch: Schnörkel (Squiggle), 2013. Plastic (from packaging). Ute, EitzenhöferBrooch: Schnörkel (Squiggle), 2013Plastic (from packaging)Photo by Michael Müller. Ute Eitzenhöfer
Brooch: Schnörkel (Squiggle), 2013
Plastic (from packaging)


Ute, Eitzenhöfer
Brooch: Schnörkel (Squiggle), 2013
Plastic (from packaging)
Photo by Michael Müller
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Ute Eitzenhöfer. Neckpiece: Untitled, 2013. Calcedony rose from Rio Grande do Sul, 925 silver, sulphured. Photo by Michael Müller. Ute Eitzenhöfer
Neckpiece: Untitled, 2013
Calcedony rose from Rio Grande do Sul, 925 silver, sulphured
Photo by Michael Müller
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Ute Eitzenhöfer. Object: Rose gold sheet with handle, 2013. 750 rose gold, fragment of plastic bottle engraved. Photography: Michael Müller. Ute Eitzenhöfer
Object: Rose gold sheet with handle, 2013
750 rose gold, fragment of plastic bottle engraved
Photography: Michael Müller
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
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