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Kontti: Finnish contemporary jewellery exhibition

Exhibition  /  17 Jun 2006  -  09 Jul 2006
Published: 30.06.2006
Lappeenranta market place
Place
Market place
Lappeenranta
FINLAND
Mail:
tarjatuupanenE-mailhotmail.com
Management:
Tarja Tuupanen
.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.

Intro
(...) The container is like a vessel: personal, social, political, nostalgic, recyclable. On the other hand it is like a state of being, a journey. It can be a place to collect to, put away, rediscover or a feeling that always travels with you. (...)

Thoughts of a Container

During one particular spring evening while travelling by train from Helsinki to Lappeenranta, I was pondering on how I could visualize a jewellery exhibit in a shipping container. I had been asked to choose pieces for a much smaller space than the compartment I was presently sitting in. I tried to picture myself in a more confined room without the surrounding windows and people. Eyes closed, I heard occasional voices around me, speaking in Finnish, Russian, Spanish, and English. Someone started to eat chicken and a scent of a strong perfume wafted through the air. Mobile phones began to ring, somebody was expected at home, another was haunted by his job, and someone else was making plans for the weekend. Everyone had bags and packages with them. All of these people were on their way to somewhere and with their different tales they all had room to sit side by side, to even start blending with each other. My colleague, who often travels by train, recently told me how in a railway carriage – among complete strangers – the most interesting art related exchanges of thoughts are brought into existence. In a train people have time and they are open. A container should be able to create a similar emotional state. After all, as a place it is not any more familiar to the artist than it is to the audience. A container would be some kind of an unbiased space for discussion.

The field of jewellery art, for more than several decades, has actively tried to search means for approaching the audience, to find innovative frames for presenting contemporary jewellery, to inspire the crowds, and to make them think. I believe that in the container, a possibility opens for attracting an interest in contemporary jewellery, even in the people who find the refinement and distance of galleries unnerving. The container is like a vessel: personal, social, political, nostalgic, recyclable. On the other hand it is like a state of being, a journey. It can be a place to collect to, put away, rediscover or a feeling that always travels with you. Under this umbrella of free conception, every artist had a chance to introduce the pieces they had started to work on earlier or had presented previously.

It is difficult to speak about a common direction in contemporary jewellery art even inside the borders of one country. Art is a craft for the individual, where everything is permitted and the most definite criterion is the inner compulsion to work, to express one’s self, and the skill to believe in and to interpret the thing that is being created. Also my own criterion for choice was above all subjective. In my selection, I also considered the competent audience of the international jewellery exhibit Jewellery II and I collected a range of jewellery as multifaceted as possible.

Much of the jewellery I saw was filled with deep solemnity, even a melancholy that always reminds me of Finland. Does it originate in the polar night and the cold winters or in the fact that the summers are so short? On the other hand, the jewellery I saw does not have a direct connection to Finnish tradition and nationality. Its inspirations and soul mates are to be found in all varieties of art or in everyday life, they are not chained to the borders of Finland.

Finnish contemporary jewellery has started a daring dialogue with the tendencies and the schools present in other countries. The freedom of form and material unites Finnish jewellery art to the trends of Western Europe, but in the treatment of its subject matter Finnish jewellery is much more restrained.

I understand these works in a poetic-narrative way. Details, professional skills, and their unrestricted utilization are important. A work may be a scarf assembled from the shells of pistachio nuts, created as a result of relaxing meditation or a knotty necklace, like a reminder of fundamental things. Jewellery can be a bottomless hole carved in stone, or a space inside, which appears to be piled from the miniature cylindrical shells used in the building of wells, or it may as well be made of intertwined keepsakes. All around the world, ready-made has become an inseparable part of contemporary jewellery art. The exhibition introduces pieces that are disturbingly titillating in their essence. I’m reminded of a dramatic and grieving black swan or a tied bouquet of bones, a sign of irreversible erosion. And much more.

I am positively surprised to have met artists who share a common desire to showcase modern jewellery art to a Finnish audience. Readiness for co-operation tends to be quite rare at present. I wish all the participants much strength for continuing work as important as this. In excitement, I wait for the summer when I can travel to Lappeenranta again and experience all of these works now already collected in the container.

Ketli Tiitsar

May 2006, Tallinn

Translated from Finnish by Minna Salakari

Remarks


Open daily 8am - 6pm

Helena Lehtinen. Brooch: Untitled, 2006. Fimo, thread, ready made, tape. Helena Lehtinen
Brooch: Untitled, 2006
Fimo, thread, ready made, tape
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Tarja Tuupanen. Brooch: Untitled, 2006. White quarz, silver. Tarja Tuupanen
Brooch: Untitled, 2006
White quarz, silver
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Kaisa Nyberg. Necklace: Miss time IV, 2006. A case of a watch, silver, shells, textile. Kaisa Nyberg
Necklace: Miss time IV, 2006
A case of a watch, silver, shells, textile
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Mervi Kurvinen. Necklace: Benny Hill, 2005. Silver, plastic, hand painted miniature on porcelain. Mervi Kurvinen
Necklace: Benny Hill, 2005
Silver, plastic, hand painted miniature on porcelain
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Nelli Tanner. Brooch: Dinner at six o'clock, 2006. Zinc, silver, textile. Nelli Tanner
Brooch: Dinner at six o'clock, 2006
Zinc, silver, textile
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Maria Nuutinen. Object: Bed time prayers (pin cushion), 2006. Textile, plastic, pins, ironing transfer, filling. Maria Nuutinen
Object: Bed time prayers (pin cushion), 2006
Textile, plastic, pins, ironing transfer, filling
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Stefan Maroschek. Ring: Saint Dionysius, 2004. Silver, gold, bone, meteorite. Stefan Maroschek
Ring: Saint Dionysius, 2004
Silver, gold, bone, meteorite
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Kati Nulpponen. Necklace: In mourning dress, 2006. Cotton thread, pigment, nylon thread, silver. Kati Nulpponen
Necklace: In mourning dress, 2006
Cotton thread, pigment, nylon thread, silver
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