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Light as a cloud, deep as light and shade by Mari Ishikawa

Exhibition  /  12 May 2022  -  17 Jun 2022
Published: 11.05.2022
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© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.

Intro
The gallery presents for the first time contemporary signature jewelry pieces with a retrospective of Ishakawa's work, in which long exposure photographs of nature serve as inspiration for the creation of her jewelry.

Artist list

Mari Ishikawa
Mari Ishikawa sees a parallel world through her everyday life and she translates them into jewelry.
“We can't see anything unless we try. Discovery begins with the sense of sight”. Various elements from the natural world as a theme, her jewelry offers tactile sensations by touch which remind us of a physical presence of the ever-changing beauty of our nature.

Galeria ANA SERRATOSA presents Light as a cloud, deep as light and shade, an exhibition by the artist Mari Ishikawa (1964, Kyoto, Japan) at Pascual y Genís 19 gallery.
The gallery presents for the first time contemporary signature jewelry pieces with a retrospective of Ishakawa's work, in which long exposure photographs of nature serve as inspiration for the creation of her jewelry.
In her work, we can appreciate the impact of her cultural heritage, from the meticulousness with which the pieces are elaborated, to the choice of colours used, as well as the constant play of light and shadow that vertebrates each of the collections.
A work where parallel worlds of nature, plants, clouds, light, shadow, and colours are recognised; with materials such as silver, gold, or pearls that create jewels of great delicacy.

The days and times proposed for the visit are as follows:
Thursday, May 12 at 8 pm
Friday, May 13 at 6 pm
Friday, May 13 at 8 pm
Saturday, May 14 at 12 am

If you are interested in attending we kindly ask you to confirm attendance by sending an email at info@anaserratosa.com, calling 963 509 000, or sending a WhatsApp message to 600 022 924, in order to control the capacity.

Opening information:
Monday to Friday
10 am - 14 pm /17 pm - 20 pm


Light as a cloud, deep as light and shade
Forget the way you were looking at the world when you go for a walk with Mari Ishikawa. She will lead you to focus your eyes like a camera travelling through a tunnel, and you will discover a microcosm where nature takes on a new dimension.
Branches of a tree against the sky. Light and shade. How many layers to reach the core? Can you ever arrive? A photograph of rocks, shaped by different shades of grey. Its reflection is a hint on the nearly black, oily surface of the water. Only at a second look do we discover the green of the grass and of the leaves of trees, a different colour within this grey world. Photos of nature taken in the moonlight, showing unsuspected images of our familiar world. Images that we have never seen before: are they illusions or reality? Taken with a long exposure, the photos allow the aspect of time to flow into the picture. Not only nature itself, but also 15-30 minutes of its existence are captured in a single image. Time for meditation and reflection in our fast-moving world. And an image that will help us remember.
"Landscape is the totality of everything encompassing us. Depending on how it is framed, things of all different kinds come into view’", says Mari Ishikawa in her lecture on Parallel Worlds.
Humans try to rule nature, to change it according to their needs, to exploit it for their benefit. The interest of the artist focuses on different cycles of dynamics between nature and the man-made world. Wherever humans destroy nature in order to create a sterile world made of stone, plants disappear only for a short period of time, to be the first to regrow once this world starts to fall apart. Civilisations such as the Maya created cities devoid of trees and plants, with buildings as high as they could raise in order to come closer to the sky and to their gods. But soon after this civilisation collapsed, the jungle took over and covered their cities so completely that they disappeared almost without trace. Human intervention is only temporary. Nature is waiting patiently for its time to come back and recapture what was taken away from her. Even though plants look fragile and delicate, they are strong enough to be the first to re-establish this natural balance.

"The brushwood we gather - stack it together,
it makes a hut,
pull it apart,
a field once more."
(*)

This is the message of a traditional Japanese poem. On one of her journeys, Mari Ishikawa visited an old garden with ruined buildings. As the walls gradually fell down and crumbled to dust, plants started to grow over the ruins and recapture the space that originally belonged to them. This silent revolution inspired her to create her series of works with the theme Landscape as one aspect of her parallel worlds, exploring the relationship between landscape and architecture.
Delicate, curling leaves and flowers embrace the straight, stiff structures of man-made objects in her ‘Landscape’ jewellery. Instinct is stronger than reason. Clouds are light as air, and a red thread of life interweaves them all. Walls are defeated by the soft and uncompromising power of nature.
Of all the things she sees in nature plants are the most fascinating. The cycle of death and rebirth is wonderfully represented through plants: from the black darkness of earth grows a small plant, the first growth and the bud of the flower often red, then it turns green, flowers, bears fruit and seeds, then dies in order to be reborn with the new season. Plants are symbols of the constant and inextinguishable renewal of life. The seed bears the memory of the parent and repeats its basic form and yet it is a unique, individual living being with his own history, and this history is in turn passed on to the seed it produces.

In her jewellery, Mari Ishikawa uses the delicate details of the plant world, the forms of branches, leaves, flowers, and moss. Yet her main focus is not on detail but on the atmosphere created by the whole. Beauty is in the atmosphere and not in the object itself. This atmosphere is created by zones of light and shade, like the filtered light coming through the shōji of traditional Japanese houses clad with white Japanese paper, like in the house of her own grandmother. Shade provides protection whereas in bright light we are helplessly exposed. All colours look different in shade than they do in the light: they are calmer, quieter, deeper, and more subtle. In the words of Japanese writer Jun'ichirō Tanizaki:

“Whenever I see the alcove of a tastefully built Japanese room, I marvel at our comprehension of the secrets of shadows, our sensitive use of shadow and light. The beauty of the alcove is not the work of some clever device. An empty space is marked off with plain wood and plain walls, so that the light is drawn into its forms dim shadows within emptiness. There is nothing more. And yet, when we gaze into the darkness that gathers behind the crossbeam, around the flower vase, beneath the shelves, though we know perfectly well it is a mere shadow, we are overcome with the feeling that in this small corner of the atmosphere there reigns complete and utter silence; that here in the darkness immutable tranquillity holds sway.”  (**)

Plants are material, whereas shade is immaterial. Material things are constant in their substance and bear colour. Red is the colour of life and growth and Mari uses red not only as of thread of life through her garden but also for her objects of ‘memory’, her secret red, on the back of the object. You need to turn the object around, in order to see behind the visible, the surface, in a material and palpable way. No matter from what colour or what object shade is cast, it is always grey. As the shade is immaterial, it constantly changes its shape, depth, and intensity from darker to lighter greys. The interaction between this material and immaterial world creates constantly changing atmospheres in parallel worlds.
Mari Ishikawa often takes her motifs from her own photographic works, where she captures the atmosphere of a timespan in which she opens her lens to let in the moonlight and the colours and shades of trees, flowing water, rocks, and moss, all reduced to the basic Japanese colours of different shades of grey, deep red, blue and green. Her close-up studies of unusual plants provide textures which recreate the effect of light and shade in her jewellery. Looking at her work, we can recognise parallel worlds of nature, architecture, plants, clouds, light, shade, and colour – images of incredible depth, atmosphere, and magic. The story, the secret behind them, and the memory are ours.

/ Gabriella Zaharias-Doff. 26.10.2015


(*)Traditional Japanese poem, Jun'ichirō Tanizaki, In Praise of Shadows, Leete’s Island Books, 1977
(**) Jun'ichirō Tanizaki, In Praise of Shadows, Leete’s Island Books, 1977




 
Mari Ishikawa. Neckpiece: Rebirth, 2021. 925 silver, partly oxidized, black diamond. 48 x 4.5 x 2.5 cm. Mari Ishikawa
Neckpiece: Rebirth, 2021
925 silver, partly oxidized, black diamond
48 x 4.5 x 2.5 cm
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Mari Ishikawa. Brooch: Rebirth, 2019. 925 silver, partly oxidized, moonstone, silk. 9 x 8 x 1.5 cm. Mari Ishikawa
Brooch: Rebirth, 2019
925 silver, partly oxidized, moonstone, silk
9 x 8 x 1.5 cm
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Mari Ishikawa. Neckpiece: Parallel World, 2012. Silver, Pearls. 55 x 8.5 x 5 cm. Mari Ishikawa
Neckpiece: Parallel World, 2012
Silver, Pearls
55 x 8.5 x 5 cm
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Mari Ishikawa. Brooch: Moonlight Shadow, 2010. 925 silver partly oxidized.. 9 x 8 x 4 cm. Mari Ishikawa
Brooch: Moonlight Shadow, 2010
925 silver partly oxidized.
9 x 8 x 4 cm
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Mari Ishikawa. Brooch: Moonlight Shadow, 2010. 925 silver, partly oxidized. 8 x 9.5 x 3 cm. Mari Ishikawa
Brooch: Moonlight Shadow, 2010
925 silver, partly oxidized
8 x 9.5 x 3 cm
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Mari Ishikawa. Brooch: In the Shade of the Tree, 2007. 750 gold, 925 silver goldplated. 7 x 5.5 x 4 cm. Mari Ishikawa
Brooch: In the Shade of the Tree, 2007
750 gold, 925 silver goldplated
7 x 5.5 x 4 cm
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
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