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Pforzheim University School of Design. Degree Show 2019

Exhibition  /  SchoolsDegreeShow2019   EmergingValues  /  11 Jul 2019  -  13 Jul 2019
Published: 24.10.2019
The nice group of our fresh graduate summer 2019, photo by Petra Jaschke.
. From left to right: Liesel Rauschmayer, Theresa Schwaiger, Silvia Bogatzki, Veronika Sola, Nareh Apelian, Lena Hetzel, Kiala Potthast, Jule Meinecke, Janina Au, Sophie Bernauer (without Jesamine Frei, Melanie Janke and Xin Liu)..
The nice group of our fresh graduate summer 2019, photo by Petra Jaschke.
From left to right: Liesel Rauschmayer, Theresa Schwaiger, Silvia Bogatzki, Veronika Sola, Nareh Apelian, Lena Hetzel, Kiala Potthast, Jule Meinecke, Janina Au, Sophie Bernauer (without Jesamine Frei, Melanie Janke and Xin Liu).

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.

Intro
These young designers explore and develop individual positions within the context of jewellery and object, while at the same time expanding our understanding of what these definitions entail.

Artist list

Nareh Apelian, Janina Au, Sophie Bernauer, Silvia Bogatzki, Jesamine Frei, Lena Hetzel, Melanie Janke, Xin Liu, Jule Meinecke, Kiala Potthast, Theresa Schwaiger, Veronika Ana Sola
The works of these twelve graduates sharpen our view of the familiar and the everyday. They question structures which we ourselves promote consciously and subconsciously. They expose relationship which influences our lives, explore the magic of one’s own doing and search for the essence of being human in the tangible as well as the intangible. That which is felt is visualized, materialized. Technical developments seduce us, material and process characteristics reveal the beauty in unexpected moments.
/Prof. Christine Lüdeke


Kompliment by Nareh Apelian:
The event itself is the center of this work. A moment is created, which illustrates the vitality of this event. The compliment itself ist the event. Catching the essence of a compliment guided Nareh Apelian's curiosity and within her research, she discovered that a compliment is not static.
The light installation forces the observer through interaction, to deal with the compliment by himself and finally to understand that it is intangible.

Guiding teacher: Prof. Christine Lüdeke, Prof. Dr Silke Helmerdig.


Der Massenmensch by ​Janina Au and Lena Hetzel:
Man is self-determined and heteronomous.
Man is described as a subject, a being with an inner space that is part of his environment, that influences it and that is influenced. The state of mass reveals the essence of the subject. The formation of the masses illustrates the sovereignty of the masses as collective bodies and the longing of man to experience itself as part of something whole. But it also shows that the I in the physical mass is experienced in a different way, in a sense a short reset takes place. The disintegration of the masses has the potential for one‘s own organization and determination of the self.
Mass is an unsystematic system. The subjects interact with each other, determining instances blur and merge. The feelings of the self fade with the feelings of the self among many. The others become one with the Self, which is nevertheless separated in its parts.
Heteronomy and self-determination are experienced at the same moment.
To what extent is the subject something specific in a system or the community?
Is the subject of the system itself?
Is this precisely where the potential of the self can be found?

In the performance, Der Massenmensch by Lena Hetzel and Janina Au, mass and subject are taken up in a performative and creative way. Through the design of the jewellery, people are formed into systems and through the systematized actions, the relationships between outside influence - and personal potential are being questioned. The spatially separated systems are characterized by different communities. They assume that man and man or man and space are connected with each other. The basic forms, circles and lines, are decisive for the pieces of jewellery and performative movement sequences.
The movement patterns of each system affect other systems despite their alleged separateness.
For themselves, the pieces of jewellery are objects of no use. By wearing the pieces within a performative representation of a community or in the connection within the spatial environment, the pieces are given meaning.

Production for 20 performers.
Duration 45 min.
Guiding teacher: Prof. Christine Lüdeke, Prof. Robert Eikmeyer.


Girl Power by Sophie Bernauer and Theresa Schwaiger:
Design in its form and function is like a picture of current circumstances. Moreover, it is a central part of our everyday life. It has an impact on the perception of society and the public and therefore on gender. We form objects and in turn, we are formed or formulated by the objects surrounding us; the environment shapes us and we shape the environment. In conclusion, the design has the power to make a change, to challenge traditional concepts and the structures of power and to clarify normative thinking without focusing on stimulating consumption. The Bachelor Thesis Girl Power starts at this point: it provides the impetus for socio-economic and political discussions in relation to women in society with the aim of achieving a change in stereotypes. The problems and constraints such as beauty ideals, the role assigned to women by society and gender marketing that women are confronted with are discussed and visualized. In doing so, the detachment and liberation are conceptually included. The design of Girl Power does not follow the principle form follows function but form follows criticism. The work describes the way of liberation by installation and is accompanied by sound as well as by mobile and electrically controlled objects.

Guiding teacher: Prof. Christine Lüdeke, Prof. Dr Silke Helmerdig


Unfassbar - Incomprehensible by Veronika Ana Sola:
It’s about things that already take you in by the mere sight, things that radiate something from within that can’t be described exactly.
These certain things, objects, works, which occupy you in an incomprehensible way.
But what is the essence that makes objects have such an effect on the viewer? Is it the ingredient of manual work, that things created with the hands, with the human body are charged with special energy? For in creation, the whole of the human being is involved, his thoughts, his feelings and his body, which can possibly provide things with an aura.
And doesn’t man long for unique pieces made by hand, for this very reason? Or could it be something completely different?
And the question, if the man is removed from the process of creation, does the aura of things disappear? It is, however, the incomprehensible, which perhaps cannot be defined and which makes the confrontation with this question so exciting.

Guiding teacher: Prof. Christine Lüdeke, Prof. Dr Silke Helmerdig.


Phantasma by Melanie Janke:
A phantasm is a hallucination, a disturbance of perception, a mirage. What we believe to be seen does not necessarily correspond to reality. It can also hide hallucinations, a déjà vu or a mirage behind it. When we look in the mirror, we are sure to always see the truth. However, what we see is always only the outer truth, the appearance. This work poses the question of what a mirror should be in order to reflect our inner self when we look into it.

Guiding teacher: Prof. Christine Lüdeke, Prof. Dr Silke Helmerdig.


Fragment by Jule Meinecke:
How do we perceive fragments?
How can we recognize them?
Does the whole stand in contrast to the fragment and what is their relationship?
The sphere is one of the best-known symbols of humanity and symbolizes wholeness and order of the world. But how do individual fragments behave in this order?
Do fragments arrange themselves in such a way that they form a whole?
Do fragments stand alone and for themselves? Or do they imply a wholeness that is not present?
The fragment can be part of a whole, it can stand independently and it can develop into a new whole.
Working in ceramics and glass with techniques that emphasize the tension between human control and forces of nature, Jule Meinecke pursues these questions, illuminating a natural fragmentation process. An intellectual insight becomes intuitively understood on an emotional and aesthetic level.
Jule Meinecke graduated with a BA in Jewelry from Pforzheim University this year. In exploring jewelry in terms of material and form on the body throughout her studies, her focus and fascination turned more and more to various materials, shapes and processes in different relationships to each other and our interaction with them. Respecting the roots of craft techniques while conscientiously exploiting them is the basis of her joy and exploration. This research-oriented way of working is an important foundation for her jewelry and object design, regardless of whether the research itself is the work or leads to wearable and useable objects.

Guiding teacher: Prof. Christine Lüdeke, Prof. Dr Silke Helmerdig.


ay-yek-kāh by Silvia Bogatzki:
God called to the man and said to him: אֶֽיָכה (’ay-yek-kāh). Where are you he asked the man who ate from the tree of knowledge and thus became an individual? If he looks in the mirror he sees himself; a single being that can be clearly separated from other individuals. Since then man suffers from the pain of separation, which he seeks to heal. Man experiences healing by renouncing any idols and become what he already from the very beginning is. Namely, the image of God. Through the full incarnation, man becomes like God, and thus again One with his reflection.

Guiding teacher: Prof. Christine Lüdeke, Prof. Dr Silke Helmerdig.


Fluss - Flow by Jesamine Frei:
An examination with life and the changes it brings.
Every moment is full of new impressions.
Everything is transitory.
Everything flows.
Fragile objects emerge by applying thin ceramic layers onto inflammable materials.
Yet Jesamine Frei‘s objects still entail remarkable stability.
Their insides show the beauty of transiency in the form of burnt ashes resulting from the supporting materials which originally gave shape to the forms.

Guiding teacher: Prof. Christine Lüdeke, Prof. Isabel Zuber.


Heaven‘s got new stars by Kiala Potthast:
Goddess of the female cycle
We know our ups and downs and the pleasure and pain we go
through during our cycle. A cycle connected to the moon - to mother nature.
Let‘s get back to that. knowing us. embracing us. simply being us.

Goddess of female liberation
What did we learn to be normal? let‘s rethink and question norms
and standards put up by society, religion and social surroundings.
What do you really want?
Unwind your mind and free yourself.

Goddess of female pleasure
The female orgasm has been mystified for long enough.
8000 nerves are ending in our clitoris. that's twice more than in male
genitalia. we have power for pleasure. understand that. try that.
ask for that. And above all, feel yourself.

Guiding teacher: Prof. Christine Lüdeke, Prof. Dr Silke Helmerdig.


3D Hand by Xin Liu:
The five objects are the result of a new, manual design method which combines the additive fabrication process of 3D printers with traditional craftsmanship. Thinking about manual work in the context of our digital age is at the heart of the development process. The manual work mimics the additive process of 3D printing. Using metal, a complicated three-dimensional composition emerges. It makes it possible now to create a perfect structure which cannot be solely made by traditional hand-making techniques nor by 3D printing. The aim is to develop a new design language between manual and digital.
The idea is realized by continuously constructing new soldering layers onto the plaster.
Constructing the form develops while making and is thus under creative control. By using different, interdependent fabrication methods and various small elements, Xin Liu tries to incorporate the tangible and the abstract space into his work in search of imparting depth.

Guiding teacher: Prof. Christine Lüdeke, Prof. Minjie Yu.
 
Nareh Apelian. Installation: Kompliment, 2019. Plastic, light.. Approx. 30 x 30 cm. Photo by: Petra Jaschke. Nareh Apelian
Installation: Kompliment, 2019
Plastic, light.
Approx. 30 x 30 cm
Photo by: Petra Jaschke
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Janina Au. Lena Hetzel. Installation: Der Massenmensch, 2019. Nickel silver.. Ø 40 cm. Photo by: Eva Janson. Performance. Janina Au
Lena Hetzel
Installation: Der Massenmensch, 2019
Nickel silver.

Ø 40 cm
Photo by: Eva Janson
Performance

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Sophie Bernauer. Theresa Schwaiger. Installation: Girl Power, 2019. Styrofoam, building foam, synthetic hair, varnish, art fur, nickel silver (razor blade).. Approx. from 50 - 200 cm. Photo by: Vuk Kokot. Sophie Bernauer
Theresa Schwaiger
Installation: Girl Power, 2019
Styrofoam, building foam, synthetic hair, varnish, art fur, nickel silver (razor blade).
Approx. from 50 - 200 cm
Photo by: Vuk Kokot
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Veronika Ana Sola. Head Piece: Incomprehensible, 2019. Sintered stainless steel.. Ø 25 cm. Photo by: Veronika Ana Sola. Veronika Ana Sola
Head Piece: Incomprehensible, 2019
Sintered stainless steel.
Ø 25 cm
Photo by: Veronika Ana Sola
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Melanie Janke. Installation: Phantasma, 2019. Mirror foil, black lacquer.. Approx. 100 x 50 cm. Photo by: Melanie Janke. Melanie Janke
Installation: Phantasma, 2019
Mirror foil, black lacquer.
Approx. 100 x 50 cm
Photo by: Melanie Janke
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Jule Meinecke. Object: Fragment, 2019. Porcelain, plate glass, kanthal wire.. Various, approx 5 - 40 cm. Photo by: Petra Jaschke. Jule Meinecke
Object: Fragment, 2019
Porcelain, plate glass, kanthal wire.
Various, approx 5 - 40 cm
Photo by: Petra Jaschke
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Silvia Bogatzki. Object: ay-yek-kāh, 2019. Glass silver mirrored, paper.. Ø 15 - 30 cm. Photo by: Petra Jaschke. Silvia Bogatzki
Object: ay-yek-kāh, 2019
Glass silver mirrored, paper.
Ø 15 - 30 cm
Photo by: Petra Jaschke
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Jesamine Frei. Object: Fluss - Flow, 2019. Ceramic. Approx. 6 -10 cm. Photo by: Frederik Bicheler. Jesamine Frei
Object: Fluss - Flow, 2019
Ceramic
Approx. 6 -10 cm
Photo by: Frederik Bicheler
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Kiala Potthast. Installation: Heaven’s got new stars, 2019. Goldplated brass, sweet water pearls, silicon, crystals. rope, different fabrics.. Photo by: Petra Jaschke. Performance with jewellery.. Kiala Potthast
Installation: Heaven’s got new stars, 2019
Goldplated brass, sweet water pearls, silicon, crystals. rope, different fabrics.
Photo by: Petra Jaschke
Performance with jewellery.

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Xin Liu. Object: Untitled, 2019. Chain links in bronze, silver plumb bob.. 14.8 x 16.8 x 25.5 cm. Photo by: Petra Jaschke. Detail view.. Xin Liu
Object: Untitled, 2019
Chain links in bronze, silver plumb bob.
14.8 x 16.8 x 25.5 cm
Photo by: Petra Jaschke

Detail view.

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