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PXL-MAD School of Arts. MA Degree Show 2021

Exhibition  /  NewTalentsByKlimt02  /  26 Jul 2021  -  27 Jul 2021
Published: 09.07.2021
Centaine Wekking. Necklace: ‘Onopgemerkte schoonheid NR.1’, 2021. Copper, silver, enamel.. 17 x 54 x 1 cm. Photo by: David Huycke. From series: Onopgemerkte schoonheid Unnoticed beauty. 
. Fungi are strongly present in our environment and nature. Most people aren’t aware of this, so my aim is to bring out the beauty of fungi, which is quickly seen as a dirty thing. Research shows how useful fungi enrich our lives and how some species can brighten up nature. ‘Unnoticed Beauty’ is a research in which the beautiful qualities of fungi and other organisms are translated into jewellery. It is an abstract reinterpretation of a fungus that becomes wearable on the body. The aim is not to literally copy a fungus, but to make the wearer admire the characteristics of fungi such as color, texture and form.. Centaine Wekking
Necklace: ‘Onopgemerkte schoonheid NR.1’, 2021
Copper, silver, enamel.
17 x 54 x 1 cm
Photo by: David Huycke
From series: Onopgemerkte schoonheid Unnoticed beauty

Fungi are strongly present in our environment and nature. Most people aren’t aware of this, so my aim is to bring out the beauty of fungi, which is quickly seen as a dirty thing. Research shows how useful fungi enrich our lives and how some species can brighten up nature. ‘Unnoticed Beauty’ is a research in which the beautiful qualities of fungi and other organisms are translated into jewellery. It is an abstract reinterpretation of a fungus that becomes wearable on the body. The aim is not to literally copy a fungus, but to make the wearer admire the characteristics of fungi such as color, texture and form.
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.

Intro
The themes of the exhibition which the students have been exploring the past year are very diverse, from post-pandemic jewellery to vases with flowers, from jewels for architectural spaces to fungi in nature. The graduation exhibition showcasing the work of the master students Object & Jewellery in The energy building of C-mine, a historical mining site in the city of Genk, Belgium.

Artist list

Lisa Berden, Renee Ramaekers, Loranne Theunissen, Olha Timkova, Centaine Wekking, Yang Xu
The graduation exhibition of the Object & Jewellery department from PXL-MAD School of Arts, Hasselt (BE) took place in the energy building of C-mine, a historical mining site in the city of Genk, Belgium. Surrounded by old and rusty ruins that seem to still vibrate in the haze of coal and the blast of machines, the modern design of the students’ work traverses a different timeline yet somehow echoes a dazzling harmony under the high ceiling that has witnessed the passage of time.

In this intriguing environment, the show manifested itself as a true melting pot. The themes, which the students have been exploring the past year, are very diverse, from post-pandemic jewellery to vases with flowers, from jewels for architectural spaces to fungi in nature. Everyone imposed their own concept while mastering certain techniques. Yang Xu explores hair as the raw material and through imagining new techniques unearth its vibrant enchantment. Olha Timkova creates illusions and distorted perceptions through her glass pieces. Lisa Berden approaches architectural spaces as bodies that carry her objects, inducing reflections as jewellery. Centaine Wekking concentrated on craft processes, working with metal and experimenting with enameling were paramount during her research. Loranne Theunissen developed her own design methodologies while translating vases, as existing, everyday, objects to the proportions of the body. Renée Ramaekers explored faces and expressions through a wide range of materials, from pearls to textiles and metal, with the aim to offer a positive response to current difficult times. From these engaged thematics, the material choices, the philosophical concepts, to the setups of the presentation, all six graduates managed to bloom in their own universe and exert a rhythmic dynamism as a whole. 

Currently, the works are on show in gallery Multiple, Hasselt (till the 17th of July). 

Teachers international MA program:
Prof. Dr. David Huycke (coordinator International Master in Object & Jewellery), Nedda El-Asmar (coordinator Object & Jewellery department), Audi Pauwels, Dr. Karen Wuytens, Drs. Liesbet Bussche, Prof. Dr. Bert Willems.

Full staff of the Object & Jewellery department:
Prof. Dr. David Huycke, Nedda El-Asmar, Audi Pauwels, Dr. Karen Wuytens, Kitty Spaenjers, Dr. Anneleen Swillen, Prof. Dr. Bert Willems, Dr. Lore Langendries, An Jonckers, Ing. Jonas Goiris.

Current PhD researchers: 
Drs. Patricia Domingues, Drs. Liesbet Bussche, Drs. Joani Groenewald, Drs. Charlotte Vanhoubroeck.

More info for the Master Program  PXL-MAD School of Arts
 
Lisa Berden. Object: Like a brillance worn by space, 2021. Plexiglass, metal.. 45 x 45 x 20 cm. Photo by: David Huycke. From series: Like a brillance worn by space. 
. A shining piece of jewellery draws a lot of attention to the body. I want to pull this quality away from the human body and use it to adorn the space instead. This research topic originated from the fusion between my previous study ‘Interior Design’ and my current study ‘Object & Jewellery’. I read the space in advance based on its visual qualities and architectural impact. This includes physical aspects such as angles, materials and scale, but also intangible elements such as light and atmosphere.. Lisa Berden
Object: Like a brillance worn by space, 2021
Plexiglass, metal.
45 x 45 x 20 cm
Photo by: David Huycke
From series: Like a brillance worn by space

A shining piece of jewellery draws a lot of attention to the body. I want to pull this quality away from the human body and use it to adorn the space instead. This research topic originated from the fusion between my previous study ‘Interior Design’ and my current study ‘Object & Jewellery’. I read the space in advance based on its visual qualities and architectural impact. This includes physical aspects such as angles, materials and scale, but also intangible elements such as light and atmosphere.
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Renee Ramaekers. Necklace: Bruce, 2021. Steel, gold plated silver, pearls, bubble clay, play-do sand.. 10 x 4 x 2 cm. Photo by: David Huycke. From series: The silly’s. 
. Post pandemic jewellery, With this theme: characters and their personality traits, I have investigated how characters can be translated into jewellery through their distinctive faces. In order to approach this translation as broadly as possible, I’ve been researching various themes such as pareidolia, masks, cartoons etc. that could support but also enrich my project both theoretically and practically. Meanwhile, in my practical research, the boundary of recognisability of these characters is constantly explored in a playful and intuitive manner. The jewellery pieces emerge from minimal elements and remind me of certain characters that I already determined beforehand or only discovered after the making process.. Renee Ramaekers
Necklace: Bruce, 2021
Steel, gold plated silver, pearls, bubble clay, play-do sand.
10 x 4 x 2 cm
Photo by: David Huycke
From series: The silly’s

Post pandemic jewellery, With this theme: characters and their personality traits, I have investigated how characters can be translated into jewellery through their distinctive faces. In order to approach this translation as broadly as possible, I’ve been researching various themes such as pareidolia, masks, cartoons etc. that could support but also enrich my project both theoretically and practically. Meanwhile, in my practical research, the boundary of recognisability of these characters is constantly explored in a playful and intuitive manner. The jewellery pieces emerge from minimal elements and remind me of certain characters that I already determined beforehand or only discovered after the making process.
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Loranne Theunissen. Ring: Blooms, 2021. Gold plated Brass.. 6 x 7 x 0.5 cm. Photo by: David Huycke. From series: Bouquet rings. 
. A fascination for the role that utensils play in daily life has led to research into designing jewellery according to my own design method. The utensils that we are confronted with on a daily basis no longer surprise us, we hardly notice them anymore. We are used to their shape and their seemingly flawless functioning. We assume that this is how they should look and forget to see why they are designed like they are. Ironically, this unawareness is the result of their perfect functioning and efficient design. The functioning is disabled by translating the utensils into jewellery. The vase, which is a jewel for the interior, suddenly becomes a jewel for the body.. Loranne Theunissen
Ring: Blooms, 2021
Gold plated Brass.
6 x 7 x 0.5 cm
Photo by: David Huycke
From series: Bouquet rings

A fascination for the role that utensils play in daily life has led to research into designing jewellery according to my own design method. The utensils that we are confronted with on a daily basis no longer surprise us, we hardly notice them anymore. We are used to their shape and their seemingly flawless functioning. We assume that this is how they should look and forget to see why they are designed like they are. Ironically, this unawareness is the result of their perfect functioning and efficient design. The functioning is disabled by translating the utensils into jewellery. The vase, which is a jewel for the interior, suddenly becomes a jewel for the body.
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Olha Timkova. Brooch: Perception3., 2021. Glass, goldplated brass, steel.. 7 x 3.5 x 2.5 cm. Photo by: David Huycke. From series: Perception & reality. 
. My graduation project is about the perception of reality and investigates methods of how optical illusions can distort our observations. In my jewelry, I try to show that not everything we see is real. To achieve this, I mainly work with glass, an intriguing material with many optical qualities. Initially, I made a virtual collection of commonly used illusions in daily life and in art, all emerging from different use of glass. . Olha Timkova
Brooch: Perception3., 2021
Glass, goldplated brass, steel.
7 x 3.5 x 2.5 cm
Photo by: David Huycke
From series: Perception & reality

My graduation project is about the perception of reality and investigates methods of how optical illusions can distort our observations. In my jewelry, I try to show that not everything we see is real. To achieve this, I mainly work with glass, an intriguing material with many optical qualities. Initially, I made a virtual collection of commonly used illusions in daily life and in art, all emerging from different use of glass. 
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Yang Xu. Brooch: Untitled, 2021. The artist’s hair, gum arabic, borosilicate glass, silver 925, obsidian stone.. 4.3 x 2.1 cm. Photo by: Yang Xu. From series: hairy enchantment. 
. Hairy Enchantment reimagines hair as a material exerting enchanting vibrancy. In an attempt to shatter its persisting human centric identity, the hairy raw material is pulverized and reassembled, burned and carbonized, knotted and entangled. The banality of the matter is multilaterally challenged and the result is a collection of decorative enigmas.. Yang Xu
Brooch: Untitled, 2021
The artist’s hair, gum arabic, borosilicate glass, silver 925, obsidian stone.
4.3 x 2.1 cm
Photo by: Yang Xu
From series: hairy enchantment

Hairy Enchantment reimagines hair as a material exerting enchanting vibrancy. In an attempt to shatter its persisting human centric identity, the hairy raw material is pulverized and reassembled, burned and carbonized, knotted and entangled. The banality of the matter is multilaterally challenged and the result is a collection of decorative enigmas.
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
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