Back
Cranbrook.
RISD.
Goldmuseum Taipei - Metal Crafts Competition 2018.

Sheffield Institute of Arts. Degree Show 2017

Exhibition  /  Schools Degree Show 2017  /  10 Jun 2017  -  23 Jun 2017
Published: 24.05.2017
.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.

Intro
Sheffield Institute presents their students creative outcome of the studies in Arts Degree Show.
 

Artist list

Eden Andres, Lirong Cai, Mingzi Chen, Amy Gotheridge, Hayley Grafflin, Yi Hong, Lanjun Li, Jiayi Lin, Xiaoran Ma, Megan Martin, Rebecca McDonnell, James Neal, Caroline Prieto, Qingyang Shen, Shuo Wang, Jingxuan Yuan, Siyi Zeng, Ping Zhu

The BA Jewellery and Metalwork Degree at Sheffield Hallam University is designed to give students a tailored education in Jewellery and Metalwork Design and Creative Practice. The aim of the programme is to give students a hands-on interaction with materials and processes, where they can identify and solve design problems through the production of carefully resolved objects.
 
Situated within Sheffield Institute of Arts; the course benefits from sitting within and alongside specialist workshops and practice studios from a range of art and design disciplines.
 
Students respond in their own personal way. Each student brings their individual cultural experiences into their work and the result is a fascinating selection of viewpoints and perspectives on making.
 
We are excited to share their outcomes with you and hope you enjoy the results of their hard work as much as we have enjoyed supporting their journeys.

Guiding Lecturers: Jenny Hutton, Alison Counsell, Chris Knight, Jeff Durber, Grace Horne, Linda Brothwell.

The students will be exhibiting from 28 June- 1 July 2017 at New Designers at Business Design Centre 52 Upper Street London N1 0QH.
 

Hours

Saturday, 10 am - 5 pm
Wednesdays, 10 am - 7 pm
Head Post Office, Fitzalan Square, Sheffield, S1 2AY


 
Eden Andres. Ring: Untitled, 2017. Silver, glass.. 7 x 2 x 5 cm. Photo by: Eden Andres. 
. My work derives from Anxiety and Reassurance, which I have expressed through glass and metal. I have explored this contrast by focusing upon the interrelationship and individual properties of these two materials. Each material has been worked to create a varied range of related pieces. The glass has been formed in a fluid, natural manner to complement its properties, whereas I have controlled the metal: manipulating it into specific shapes that then encapsulate or expose the glass to enhance its fragility.
. The metal forms encapsulating the delicate tails of the glass droplets, informs the wearer of its vulnerability, yet reinforce the protective element. This creates both tension and reassurance. When using the glass, en masse, to create a more robust structure, the metal serves as a connector to hold the pieces together, as they symbiotically relate to one another. The sound of glass against glass, in certain pieces, reminds the wearer of the delicacy and fragility of the material; the structure, however, in contrast, remains solid and secure.
.  . Eden Andres
Ring: Untitled, 2017
Silver, glass.
7 x 2 x 5 cm
Photo by: Eden Andres

My work derives from Anxiety and Reassurance, which I have expressed through glass and metal. I have explored this contrast by focusing upon the interrelationship and individual properties of these two materials. Each material has been worked to create a varied range of related pieces. The glass has been formed in a fluid, natural manner to complement its properties, whereas I have controlled the metal: manipulating it into specific shapes that then encapsulate or expose the glass to enhance its fragility.
The metal forms encapsulating the delicate tails of the glass droplets, informs the wearer of its vulnerability, yet reinforce the protective element. This creates both tension and reassurance. When using the glass, en masse, to create a more robust structure, the metal serves as a connector to hold the pieces together, as they symbiotically relate to one another. The sound of glass against glass, in certain pieces, reminds the wearer of the delicacy and fragility of the material; the structure, however, in contrast, remains solid and secure.

 
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Lirong Cai. Neckpiece: Untitled, 2017. Plastic, rubber, brass, paint.. 20 x 30 x 3 cm. Photo by: Lirong Cai. 
. My work is inspired by “retro-futurism”. I like to collect old things.  I find objects in vintage stores and street markets that satisfy me. I like to listen to my parents talk about their lives, and the life and environment of the past makes me curious. The technology and the factory, the ‘future’ as seen in the 1950s’ and 1960s’ was my inspiration.
. Geometry and spray painting are the important elements of my work. I like to use simple shapes and lines to give a sense of futurism. Spray paints produce retro colours, and gives visual impact.
. I hope that these pieces offer the wearer optimism for the future. They represent a positive notion that anything is possible.
.  . Lirong Cai
Neckpiece: Untitled, 2017
Plastic, rubber, brass, paint.
20 x 30 x 3 cm
Photo by: Lirong Cai

My work is inspired by “retro-futurism”. I like to collect old things.  I find objects in vintage stores and street markets that satisfy me. I like to listen to my parents talk about their lives, and the life and environment of the past makes me curious. The technology and the factory, the ‘future’ as seen in the 1950s’ and 1960s’ was my inspiration.
Geometry and spray painting are the important elements of my work. I like to use simple shapes and lines to give a sense of futurism. Spray paints produce retro colours, and gives visual impact.
I hope that these pieces offer the wearer optimism for the future. They represent a positive notion that anything is possible.

 
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Mingzi Chen. Neckpiece: Untitled, 2017. Copper, silver, paint.. 30 x 1 x 60 cm. Photo by: Mingzi Chen. 
. Origami and folding have been explored throughout the history of jewellery making. My work explores the use of origami folding and the relationship between the object and the wearer. The results are jewellery that is bouncy, interactive, playful, light and ethereal. During the making processes, I discovered that thin sheet metal can be fold into strong intricate forms not achievable in paper that paper. Jewellery with a life of it’s own.
.  . Mingzi Chen
Neckpiece: Untitled, 2017
Copper, silver, paint.
30 x 1 x 60 cm
Photo by: Mingzi Chen

Origami and folding have been explored throughout the history of jewellery making. My work explores the use of origami folding and the relationship between the object and the wearer. The results are jewellery that is bouncy, interactive, playful, light and ethereal. During the making processes, I discovered that thin sheet metal can be fold into strong intricate forms not achievable in paper that paper. Jewellery with a life of it’s own.
 
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Amy Gotheridge. Neckpiece: Untitled, 2017. Steel, jesmonite, mother of pearl.. 20 x 30 x 4 cm. Photo by: Amy Gotheridge. 
. The Rural and urban surroundings of Sheffield has inspired my collection. The emotional connection we make to the materials and structures we see in our everyday life can subconsciously evoke a sense of preciousness and can be turned into something we value. Taking inspiration from brutalist architecture I have used Jesmonite to imitate concrete structures, by using industrial materials like steel alongside organic materials such as leather and mother of pearl, I am challenging preconceptions of beauty and scale.
. Buildings are constructed and demolished, the internal framework is hidden and revealed, fragilities are exposed and examined. My pieces aim to encourage people to question the things they see every day and normally look straight past. Placing these on the body allows us to reflect on our own place within our environment.. Amy Gotheridge
Neckpiece: Untitled, 2017
Steel, jesmonite, mother of pearl.
20 x 30 x 4 cm
Photo by: Amy Gotheridge

The Rural and urban surroundings of Sheffield has inspired my collection. The emotional connection we make to the materials and structures we see in our everyday life can subconsciously evoke a sense of preciousness and can be turned into something we value. Taking inspiration from brutalist architecture I have used Jesmonite to imitate concrete structures, by using industrial materials like steel alongside organic materials such as leather and mother of pearl, I am challenging preconceptions of beauty and scale.
Buildings are constructed and demolished, the internal framework is hidden and revealed, fragilities are exposed and examined. My pieces aim to encourage people to question the things they see every day and normally look straight past. Placing these on the body allows us to reflect on our own place within our environment.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Hayley Grafflin. Neckpiece: Untitled, 2017. Steel, re-claimed wood, brass, paper, paint.. 20 x 36 x 2 cm. Photo by: Hayley Grafflin.  
. I am intrinsically drawn to hidden beauty and gritty details; eroded layers of paint revealing rust in every shade of orange imaginable, the soot covered pipes of the London underground that seem so vibrant and yet are entirely black. My desire is to communicate this beauty through moments and gestures which entice curiosity and evoke emotions.
. Using traditional jewellery techniques to frame, pin and suspend, I seek to control these moments; when is a piece finished? How much control is necessary? By working intuitively with my materials, I answer these questions in a natural and meaningful way, creating highly tactile work which aims to take the wearer on a journey of the world through my eyes and through my touch.. Hayley Grafflin
Neckpiece: Untitled, 2017
Steel, re-claimed wood, brass, paper, paint.
20 x 36 x 2 cm
Photo by: Hayley Grafflin
 
I am intrinsically drawn to hidden beauty and gritty details; eroded layers of paint revealing rust in every shade of orange imaginable, the soot covered pipes of the London underground that seem so vibrant and yet are entirely black. My desire is to communicate this beauty through moments and gestures which entice curiosity and evoke emotions.
Using traditional jewellery techniques to frame, pin and suspend, I seek to control these moments; when is a piece finished? How much control is necessary? By working intuitively with my materials, I answer these questions in a natural and meaningful way, creating highly tactile work which aims to take the wearer on a journey of the world through my eyes and through my touch.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Yi Hong. Vessel: Untitled, 2017. Silver.. 5 x 5 x 7 cm. Photo by: Yi Hong.  
. Affordance an exploration of the relationship between object and user; habitual gestures create pattern and evidence on everyday objects, familiarity provides comfort.
. Each of the five vessels have their own unique finger indents, creating an individual experience for the user through exploration and play; what feels comfortable to one user may be uncomfortable for another.
. The designs and process are deliberately reduced and simple, allowing the material to respond like a clean sheet of paper, retaining the crispness of the sheet material and allowing user to focus on ways of holding.
. These vessels aim to create a refined and personalised drinking experience.. Yi Hong
Vessel: Untitled, 2017
Silver.
5 x 5 x 7 cm
Photo by: Yi Hong
 
Affordance an exploration of the relationship between object and user; habitual gestures create pattern and evidence on everyday objects, familiarity provides comfort.
Each of the five vessels have their own unique finger indents, creating an individual experience for the user through exploration and play; what feels comfortable to one user may be uncomfortable for another.
The designs and process are deliberately reduced and simple, allowing the material to respond like a clean sheet of paper, retaining the crispness of the sheet material and allowing user to focus on ways of holding.
These vessels aim to create a refined and personalised drinking experience.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Megan Martin. Neckpiece: Untitled, 2017. Steel, porcelain.. 20 x 20 x 5 cm. Photo by: Megan Martin.  
. I have taken inspiration from urban plant life and the environments they grow in - pushing their way through cracks in the pavement, hanging out from walls, and so on. These plants are often overlooked and unwanted, but I find their appearance fascinating, particularly the fact that they look alien alongside these unnatural, man-made surroundings. Form and shape are key factors within my work, and as a way of highlighting this, I have subtracted the colours where possible in order to make more of a statement with the shape of my jewellery against the body. This is something that I observed in the plant life that I took inspiration from, with the bold green standing out against the artificial grey of the environment it grows in. I have worked with a combination of porcelain and metal in order to try and replicate the stark contrast between plant life and artificial structures.. Megan Martin
Neckpiece: Untitled, 2017
Steel, porcelain.
20 x 20 x 5 cm
Photo by: Megan Martin
 
I have taken inspiration from urban plant life and the environments they grow in - pushing their way through cracks in the pavement, hanging out from walls, and so on. These plants are often overlooked and unwanted, but I find their appearance fascinating, particularly the fact that they look alien alongside these unnatural, man-made surroundings. Form and shape are key factors within my work, and as a way of highlighting this, I have subtracted the colours where possible in order to make more of a statement with the shape of my jewellery against the body. This is something that I observed in the plant life that I took inspiration from, with the bold green standing out against the artificial grey of the environment it grows in. I have worked with a combination of porcelain and metal in order to try and replicate the stark contrast between plant life and artificial structures.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Rebecca McDonnell. Head Piece: Untitled, 2017. Copper, glass, steel.. 15 x 13 x 5 cm. Photo by: Rebecca McDonnell. 
. I am intrigued by how eyewear can be used to frame the face. With a jeweller’s aesthetic sensitivity and attention to details, my inspiration comes from a wide range of sources and inspired by the crossing of disciplines. 

My collection travels through traditional eyewear forms to more challenging conceptual pieces; drawing on Deconstructionism and how it is used within other disciplines such as interiors and architecture. Industrial fixing solutions are reduced and turned into tiny details of beauty within the structures; assemblage is used to add to the aesthetics and construction of the pieces. Using these construction techniques allowed me to use a variety of different metal for their qualities; creating a palette of options, colour and weight add division and depth within the pieces. As the collection evolved, ways of wearing were explored to create non-conventional approaches to eyewear; decorating, enhancing, framing the face.
.  . Rebecca McDonnell
Head Piece: Untitled, 2017
Copper, glass, steel.
15 x 13 x 5 cm
Photo by: Rebecca McDonnell

I am intrigued by how eyewear can be used to frame the face. With a jeweller’s aesthetic sensitivity and attention to details, my inspiration comes from a wide range of sources and inspired by the crossing of disciplines. 

My collection travels through traditional eyewear forms to more challenging conceptual pieces; drawing on Deconstructionism and how it is used within other disciplines such as interiors and architecture. Industrial fixing solutions are reduced and turned into tiny details of beauty within the structures; assemblage is used to add to the aesthetics and construction of the pieces. Using these construction techniques allowed me to use a variety of different metal for their qualities; creating a palette of options, colour and weight add division and depth within the pieces. As the collection evolved, ways of wearing were explored to create non-conventional approaches to eyewear; decorating, enhancing, framing the face.
 

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Qingyang Shen. Vessel: Untitled, 2017. Silver, copper.. 6 x 6 x 10 cm. Photo by: Qingyang Shen. 
. My work is a conversation between myself and the people that encounter my pieces.  This communication begins in the workshop, with a hammer in my hand at the forge. This progresses into the hands of someone I don’t yet know, holding and using the vessel I've created.  This future connection is always in my mind when I'm creating, and I am constantly striving for perfection in the perfect marriage of form and function.  The cues and markers that I leave continue my conversation with the user.
.  . Qingyang Shen
Vessel: Untitled, 2017
Silver, copper.
6 x 6 x 10 cm
Photo by: Qingyang Shen

My work is a conversation between myself and the people that encounter my pieces.  This communication begins in the workshop, with a hammer in my hand at the forge. This progresses into the hands of someone I don’t yet know, holding and using the vessel I've created.  This future connection is always in my mind when I'm creating, and I am constantly striving for perfection in the perfect marriage of form and function.  The cues and markers that I leave continue my conversation with the user.
 

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Jingxuan Yuan. Hand Piece: Untitled, 2017. White metal, paper.. 15 x 15 x 10 cm. Photo by: Jingxuan Yuan. 
. Disposable Jewellery
.  
. Jewellery is a form of expressing love.
. It is a gift.
. I sent it to my love.
. We are wearing it when we are holding hands.
. And we create it together.
. Enjoy the moment.
.  
. It is a work of love.
. It is fragile
. However,
. It contains the wishes of the designer and the experience of the wearers.
. In memory it is a kind of companion
. It is short but eternal.
. It is meaningless but meaningful.. Jingxuan Yuan
Hand Piece: Untitled, 2017
White metal, paper.
15 x 15 x 10 cm
Photo by: Jingxuan Yuan

Disposable Jewellery
 
Jewellery is a form of expressing love.
It is a gift.
I sent it to my love.
We are wearing it when we are holding hands.
And we create it together.
Enjoy the moment.
 
It is a work of love.
It is fragile
However,
It contains the wishes of the designer and the experience of the wearers.
In memory it is a kind of companion
It is short but eternal.
It is meaningless but meaningful.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Appreciate APPRECIATE