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I learned to draw in ink to achieve an intentional decisive line. Interview with Adriana Radulescu by Klimt02

Interview  /  Artists
Published: 20.09.2021
Adriana Radulescu Adriana Radulescu
Author:
Klimt02
Edited by:
Klimt02
Edited at:
Barcelona
Edited on:
2021
Adriana Radulescu. Necklace: They gave me a medal, 2020. Cast white bronze, patina, cast resin, silver wire, linen cord.. 20 x 20 x 20 cm. Photo by: Adriana Radulescu. Adriana Radulescu
Necklace: They gave me a medal, 2020
Cast white bronze, patina, cast resin, silver wire, linen cord.
20 x 20 x 20 cm
Photo by: Adriana Radulescu
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.

Intro
I do not start making something unless I can “see” it, and figure out how it will be connected, how will it look tridimensionality. How it will fit and wear could be sometimes a surprise, materials have their own way, but the design has to anticipate that. Sketching, and sometimes physical mock-ups are my tools in refining the design.
Tell us about your background. What were your first influences to be creative and become an artist and what has drawn you to contemporary jewellery?
My father, who was a structural engineer, always bought art albums. We spent hours looking over paintings and sculptures, going to museums. It teaches one to appreciate forms, composition, and colour from a young age. I loved live theatre and dreamed to be a stage designer. I knew I will never make it into the art college, and as I liked drawing and mathematics, architecture was the next best thing. I learned how to sketch like an architect, and because the admission to the architectural school required, among others, sketching with pencil on a very porous paper, I learned to draw in ink to achieve an intentional decisive line, so I would not have to erase the pencil. I love to sketch in ink, and it is an important tool for me.

Being an architect, an artist is a process, and part of it is that you have to learn how to do and make things. Although I appreciate architecture and art of all eras, I prefer modern art in all forms. There is a joy of the unexpected for me in abstract art, including in music. Many good ideas come to me, especially when attending a live contemporary chamber music concert. Music somehow helps my brain to create forms and compositions. 

When I had the chance to take jewellery and metalworking classes at the Corcoran College of Art+Design in Washington DC, I was very eager and ambivalent at the same time, as I was not sure I could do it. With solid training from great artists-teachers and lots of studio practice, one day I realized I am not holding my breath while soldering. These teachers introduced me to the work of many contemporary jewellery artists, to publications and organizations involved with contemporary jewellery.


How important is networking for you in your professional practice and what are your preferred tools for this?
Very important, because I want to be informed and to see what other artists are doing. I prefer connections within professional affiliations to social media. I value the news and information from Art Jewelry Forum, Klimt02, and the American Craft Council; these organizations and others’ online presence was and is a lifeline during the pandemic, and good use of the internet. 


What are your general thoughts on the contemporary jewellery world, (education, market, development...), where do you see chances, and where are dead ends?
I admire and find it amazing and very refreshing that in the crowded field of contemporary jewellery there are artists doing something new, unique, having their own stories and processes. It is not an easy feat. 


Thinking about your career, what role do technology and the digital play in your artistic development & communication?
Actually, both played a big role, as they enabled my participation in two virtual project exhibitions curated by ZLR Betriebsimperium during a time where the physical presence of participants and the public was impossible. These projects opened the possibility of creating video artwork, something I have never tried, or thought of trying before, and it was hard, but in the end very rewarding. In the process, I learned more about myself and how liberating sharing a story in images can be. I now have even more appreciation and respect for video and performance artists. 
 

Adriana Radulescu, Necklace: Swirls, 2019, Silver, 20 x 20 x 1 cm, Photo by: Adriana Radulescu.


How has your work changed over the past few years and what are you excited about these days? 
I do not start making something unless I can “see” it, and figure out how it will be connected, how will it look tridimensionality. How it will fit and wear could be sometimes a surprise, materials have their own way, but the design has to anticipate that. Sketching, and sometimes physical mock-ups are my tools in refining the design. The process hasn’t changed, and I hope it evolved along with my work. I have started to use more colour, specifically vitreous enamel, which was intimidating, but I decided to brave it and experiment with it. It requires a lot of time and patience, and the interesting times we live in (to allude to the prophetic 2019 Venice Art Biennale’s title) allowed for both. It is also quite enjoyable, and I definitely want to do more enameling work. I am very excited for my first solo exhibition, at Jewelers’ Werk Galerie, in September-October in Washington DC. And, with hope, I am looking forward to traveling again. 
Appreciate APPRECIATE