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Social Sharing and Learning From Others Give Me a Sense of Belonging and Make Me Feel Part of a Wonderful Tribe. Interview with Cristina Celis by Klimt02

Interview
Published: 08.02.2021
Cristina Celis Cristina Celis
Author:
Klimt02
Edited by:
Klimt02
Edited at:
Barcelona
Edited on:
2021
Cristina Celis. Brooch: Afloat, 2019. Pigmented glazed stoneware, sterling pin back.. 8 x 8 x 4 cm. Cristina Celis
Brooch: Afloat, 2019
Pigmented glazed stoneware, sterling pin back.
8 x 8 x 4 cm
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.

Intro
The power of jewelry creating collective conversation, evoking emotional response presented me with a new path. I strongly believe we need better exposure and more encouragement. [...] We need to speak loud and clear so we can educate, inform and show younger generations this field exists as an option when making decisions in their careers!
Tell us about your background. What were your first influences to be creative and become an artist and what has drawn you to contemporary jewellery?
I was born in Mexico and very early on, I knew I wanted to become a maker. I studied Industrial Design where I learned about problem solving, materials, and production. Later on, I was fortunate to be able to complete a Master's Degree at the Royal College of Art in London where I continued on a more creative path that opened my eyes towards developing concepts and generating artistic utilitarian forms.  

Many years later, I discovered the power of contemporary jewellery. I attended Walking the Gray Area in my own town, a wonderful gathering of the most important jewellery artists at that time and I was immediately in love! The power of jewellery creating collective conversation, evoking emotional response presented me with a new path. 


How important is networking for you in your professional practice and what are your preferred tools for this?
I divide my time between the digital world and the physical handwork in my studio and my head is filled with all the fascinating art I see online. 

Social sharing and learning from what other artists and makers are doing is decisive in the development of my work and most importantly, gives me a sense of belonging, makes me feel part of a Tribe. It is a fact that art creates a collective conversation that ends up permeating culture and finally civilization.


What are your general thoughts on the contemporary jewellery world, (education, market, development...), where do you see chances and where are dead ends?
The actual picture of contemporary jewelry, both excites and disheartens me. In many places, including in Mexico, it is still unfamiliar and misunderstood. 

It seems to be lost, constantly having to seek approval in the art world and trying to fit in. It tries to squeeze itself between art, design, and ornamentation, but it is still a tight and uncomfortable fit!  

I strongly believe we need better exposure and more encouragement. We need to speak loud and clear so we can educate, inform and show younger generations this field exists as an option when making decisions in their careers! We must make jewelers feel they have recognition in the art world and most importantly confirm they can make a living from being a contemporary jeweler.


Thinking about your career, what role do technology and the digital play in your artistic development & communication?
My own education in this field has been bumpy and slow. In many parts of the world, we are still in diapers in relationship to other countries. With no formal education available, contemporary jewelers have to rely on learning through workshops, travel, books, and studying the work of other jewelers! 

Contemporary jewelry reflects what is happening in the world. Jewelers are political, social, creative beings that speak and make the user and the viewers reflect, criticize, feel and laugh. I personally don't think the use of new technologies improve the result. In particular, I love the human imprint on my pieces and value the artistry of pursuing perfection through the handmade. I believe in a different level of quality control than what happens on an assembly line because jewels made by hand take on the personality and become an echo of their creator's thought and soul.


How has your work changed over the past few years and what are you excited about these days?
I seem to be moving towards new forms, new aesthetics based on simplicity. I have discovered a personal methodology with a great deal of experimentation, less distraction, and a more linear path. 

Over the years, I have understood that building up the value of my work relies on encompassing profoundness and abstraction on one hand and working towards impeccable workmanship on the other. But more importantly, I strive to achieve the integrity, perfection of the end piece and its permanence through time. If I can come a bit closer to achieving this goal, I will be very happy!
Appreciate APPRECIATE