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Education and Promotion are Keys to Making Contemporary Art Jewellery More Successful. Interview with Simon Day by Klimt02

Interview
Published: 30.10.2020
Simon Day Simon Day
Author:
Klimt02
Edited by:
Klimt02
Edited at:
Barcelona
Edited on:
2020
Simon Day. Sculpture: Expansion, 2020. Silver, steel, gold-plated bronze.. 20 cm Ø. Photo by: Simon Day. Simon Day
Sculpture: Expansion, 2020
Silver, steel, gold-plated bronze.
20 cm Ø
Photo by: Simon Day
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.

Intro
I think the whole world at this moment is wide open to all kinds of possibilities if you can tap into them creatively. People seem to be longing for things hand-made, that communicates something authentic.
Tell us about your background. What were your first influences to be creative and become an artist and what has drawn you to contemporary jewellery?
I grew up in the old City of London where I became fascinated and inspired by mankind’s attempts to explore and understand our place in the Universe, from ancient stone monuments to golden astrolabes.

A love of fine metalwork led me to study jewellery and silversmithing in London’s old jewellery and watchmaking district. My career a professional jeweller for nearly 30 years has provided me with the precise technical skills necessary to represent the images that appear in my imagination as three-dimensional metal sculpture.

My interest in the inner, spiritual world led me to study with a Tibetan Buddhist meditation master for over 20 years with whom I travelled and explored the world. The Buddhist teachings remain central to my life and work.
 

How important is networking for you in your professional practice and what are your preferred tools for this?
Networking is becoming increasingly important as a way to connect with my audience, especially as we become more interconnected virtually. I spent many years working in the remote French countryside and I became completely dependant on the internet to connect with my clients. However, I am generally quite introverted, and having spent the first half of my career pre-internet, it is perhaps more of an effort for me to engage with. I enjoy using Instagram most of all, it's so simple, immediate and direct.
 

What are your general thoughts on the contemporary jewellery world, (education, market, development...), where do you see chances and where are dead ends?
I am amazed and inspired at the quality and variety of creativity of contemporary jewellers. I think there is a gap however, between the craftspeople and the appreciation and understanding by the general public. It seems to exist in a niche in the background of the art market as a whole, and I believe that education and promotion are keys to making contemporary art jewellery more successful.

I think the whole world at this moment is wide open to all kinds of possibilities if you can tap into them creatively. People seem to be longing for things hand-made, that communicates something authentic.
 

Work by Simon Day. Sculpture: Forest, 2020. Bronze, silver, 16 cm Ø. Photo by: Simon Day.


Thinking about your career, what role do technology and the digital play in your artistic development & communication?
My creative and technical process is very analogue and old-school. I like things that have the sense that they have been made by a human being. I used CAD for many years to model and print objects but found that it lacked soul, so I went back to hand modelling.
 

How has your work changed over the past few years and what are you excited about these days?
I spent many years living and working in the remote French countryside, gradually developing my skills both technically and creatively. I feel like I have just come to the point where I am now able to express my creative vision more accurately than ever before.

Due to the increases in the price of precious metal recently, I am currently exploring working with steel to create large sculptural pieces. I am also studying with professional gilder to learn how to gild on glass and metal.
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